Tomato Schooling

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by uriah1, Oct 9, 2019.

  1. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    What did I do wrong. Some of my tomatoes are still on the vine, yellow
    or slightly darker. Only a few red ones have poped. It gets sun.,
    we almost had our first frost up North Ohio.

    Basic beefsteak.

    Any ideas?

    My Cherry tomatoes did not get red until early Sep.

    I planted mid June.

    Maybe next year I will put in buckets with purchased high quality soil.
     
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  2. teleMc

    teleMc TDPRI Member

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    They say you should rotate your tomatoes through different spots in the garden ... and plant something that put nitrogen back in the soil in between.
    Pick them and put them in the window. See if they ripen there. Nothing to loose?
     
  3. Tommy Biggs

    Tommy Biggs Friend of Leo's

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    You might consider having your soil tested by the Local Ag school Extension. They will tell you if you are low on nutrients, and how much of what fertilizers/supplements to apply. (you have to tell them its for Vegetables).

    Doing it now would give you time to prep the soil for next season.

    I've done buckets the past 3 years, and didn't have the best luck. so was thinking about going 'in the ground'.

    I'm with @teleMc , pick 'em before it frosts.
     
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  4. ElJay370

    ElJay370 Tele-Holic

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    I've heard you can ripen tomatoes by closing them up in a paper bag with a ripe apple for a day or two.
     
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  5. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    mid june might have been a little late to get started. When you're up north like that, a lot of people start the plants indoors to get a head start.

    Plus tomatoes needs lots of sun light, like 6 to 8 hours a day, if possible. Here's a good reference, research, yeah?:

    https://www.almanac.com/plant/tomatoes#

    They may ripen in a window, but again, as much sun light as you can get on them.
     
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  6. Speedy454

    Speedy454 Tele-Holic

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    A couple things to consider...
    Here around St. Louis, we have a little longer growing season than you. We get ours in around the first of May, and start picking most varieties of tomatoes around mid August, except the Early Girls that start in mid July. That's a solid 4 months before harvest for most varieties.
    Maybe pick an Early Girl or two next year with your shorter growing season.
    Weather here was kind of strange. We had a long wet cool spring/early summer then it suddenly turned hot and dry, then cool and wet again, then hot and dry. We had a decent crop of stuff, but not nearly what we normally get. My wife only got enough for the table and one batch of canned 'maters. Usually she is canning every other day through August and September.
    We have been doing this for 25 plus years and know all the tricks. The one thing we can't control is weather.
     
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  7. 6stringcowboy

    6stringcowboy Tele-Afflicted

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    Planted too late.
     
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  8. MrClint

    MrClint Tele-Meister

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    All gardening is local. Learn to compost. You can start a compost pile in the hole where you want to plant. If you want great tomatoes (or anything else for that matter) you have to trial a number of different varieties. You can ask neighbors what they grow successfully to get a good start. Sounds like you would be happy with an early variety such as "Early Girl", which is a bullet proof sure fire winner here in my locale. Alternatively, look into growing tomatoes in EarthBoxes. Super easy. Good luck!
     
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  9. unixfish

    unixfish Poster Extraordinaire

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    We planted tomatoes a few years ago. We felt confident, as tomatoes are typically poisonous to wildlife and are not bothered. They had just started to bloom, and wham. We came out the next day, and the plants were eaten down to the stalk by the deer. They are not supposed to like tomatoes, but I guess if you get hungry enough, you will eat anything.

    We cannot plant anything in our yard. Even the landscaping gets eaten down to the stalk. Everything we planted was chosen as it was labeled "highly deer resistant". The only thing those fish poops don't eat is the Russian Sage and tall grasses we planted. Very few people in our neighborhood have landscaping, because those [long string of expletives] deer eat everything.

    We've tried all the remedies to get them to leave our stuff alone. Dryer sheets? Clean smelling meal. Bags of Irish Spring? Clean smelling meal. Deer-B-Gone? Salad dressing. Fencing around plants? Just a quick push and destroy to get to their meal. Garbage cans around plants? Hey, they only weigh 40 lbs, deer are 300 - a quick push and destroy to get to their meal. Plant only stuff deer won't eat? Well, once you are hungry enough, you eat anything - and everything.

    I am ready to deploy an industrial grade, automated taser that will shoot at anything that moves during the night. Or a large bore rifle. Or...

    Yeah, we have a problem.

    Back to the original topic...
     
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  10. 68tele

    68tele Friend of Leo's

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    Yup. I am in NY (Long Island) planted my garden in late April...Took weeks for stuff to get going as it was a cooler than normal spring. Tomatoes started producing end of July, and are still going strong.
     
  11. Alamo

    Alamo Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    yeah, make a call :D

    ls1234.jpg col183.jpg
     
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  12. ICTRock

    ICTRock Tele-Afflicted

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    it's too late now but I've seen my neighbor beat her tomato plants with a broom to induce pollination ... it worked, they took off from there.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
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  13. hotpot

    hotpot Tele-Afflicted

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    Maybe planted too late! I had a bumper crop of tomatoes this year, in fact the best ever, I have to use a greenhouse here in northern England as we don't get a lot of sunshine & we have heavy rainfall.

    I started my seeds off at the beginning of March in propagators, I grew three different varieties 'Ailsa Craig' 'Glacier' and a canning variety called 'Roma' which are beautiful cooking tomatoes.

    I use a good tomato feed called 'Tomorite' https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Levingto...hash=item5b506c6422:m:mddnJcvqgnpAyejZwRFmNyA Which has stood me in good stead and is great for bell peppers too.



    [​IMG]
     
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  14. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I was mowing my weeds a few weeks back and nearly mowed this self seeded tomato bush down. I stopped just in time...o_O

    thought I'd nurture it and see how it goes.... I hope I get some fruit before the critters do....:lol:

    and just like that..I'm a gardener now ...:rolleyes::D

    DSCN2420.JPG

    DSCN2421.JPG
     
  15. rangercaster

    rangercaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    My neighbor was a farmer upstate NY in the 60s ... Started plants in a greenhouse ... Grew the best tomatoes I ever tasted ... Farming is hit and miss ... Weather and planting times are variable ... Hope for a late frost ...
     
  16. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've only heard the field supervisors talk (in a corporate setting) but what I got from them was soil temperature, nighttime temperature and a different pH than other vegetables. Never water in bright sunlight.
    Sorry I'm not any help...
     
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