To build or not to build...

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by polymolly, Apr 19, 2009.

  1. polymolly

    polymolly Tele-Meister

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    Well, I guess we all reach that time of our lifes where we say "hell! I'm going to build a guitar!".


    And of course, for the (not worth mentioning) reasons, the choice for most of us is a telecaster.

    Since this is going to be my first build, I've decided I shall not go to fancy on parts.

    To sum it up a little, wilkinson bridge with compensated brass sadles, wilkinson pups and wilkinson vintage kluson tuners, a mighty mite neck.

    The total cost right now is about 250€, adding to that the cost of wood and paint.

    which will make it the price of a classic vibe squier telecaster :(

    so, is it worth it? will the wilkinson hardware be better than squiers? will I be better buying a working guitar and then try to build a body and use the squier parts?

    the horror....
     
  2. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    Asking this bunch if you should "build" a guitar is like asking a junkie if he wants a hit of dope...

    if you know what I mean. :)

    My take on it is this:

    by assembling something yourself you can probably get the exact configuration you are looking for

    by assembling something yourself you are going to learn a great deal and have a good time

    you will probably not save yourself any money

    and there you go...the world according to The Buckocaster!

    :)
     
  3. Jack Wells

    Jack Wells Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I'd say build it. That way you won't have a Squier ......... you'll have a polymolly.
     
  4. 9-Pin-Phoenix

    9-Pin-Phoenix TDPRI Member

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    I second what Buckocaster said.

    Rarely do people get into any hobby to save money.
     
  5. steve gibson

    steve gibson Tele-Holic

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    You won't regret it until you can't stop. I frequently use Wilkinson hardware and think it is of good quality. Make sure you get the compensated saddles.
     
  6. Seal_broken

    Seal_broken TDPRI Member

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    well you save the 4000+ dollar that you would pay fender custom to build a guitar to your specification, so yeah you save money
     
  7. Mark-00255

    Mark-00255 Tele-Holic

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    Go for it! I've used Wilky tuners on two builds and like them. I used the wilky bridge with compensated saddles on one of those as well and I think it's just fine. The only thing I would wonder about is the Wilky pickups - there are lots of other inexpensive choices. But regardless, you'll end up having a great time, learn a lot and you'll have the pride of having built yourself a guitar! It is an extraordinary hobby, IMHO.
     
  8. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    You got mail

    Ron Kirn
     
  9. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    Oh! Maybe you don't ... Delivery Failure notification.... email me

    Ron Kirn
     
  10. Ragtime Dan

    Ragtime Dan Tele-Holic

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    I bought my butterscotch Squire Tele, with the idea of cannibalizing it for the parts. I was going to route a big hole in the body and put a cone in "A La Resocaster", and then put a reverse neck set up for slide on it. But when I got it, I liked the sound of it so much, I decided to leave it alone, and do a build from scratch any ways. So no savings there.:D
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2009
  11. polymolly

    polymolly Tele-Meister

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    Thanks to you all for the input. My idea was more like having a backup. Or like in the culinary tv shows, where they make something, put it in the oven and, voilá, they already have one ready on top the table... If something went wrong, i'd have a tele anyway ;)

    Of course I'd love to have gelndale bridges blah blah bla, I just think it's not worth the investment If it doesn't turn out good. I may even quite before I finish it (although for what I see here on tdpri, that won't be the case...) so spending big $€£ on it, is out of the question. I'm not trying to save money, that's not the case. I'd like to build one, but don't forget guys, it's my first. It could end up like this:

    http://www.weirdthings.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2008/04/big-foot-guitar-sasquatch-rocks-man.jpg
     
  12. Robbied_216

    Robbied_216 Tele-Afflicted

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    Yeah, my wife had an uncle that restored classic Corvettes...he could have gone out and bought a Chrysler (or is it Dodge in the USA) Neon for a lot less money, and there is "nothing" per say wrong with a Neon, but he wouldn't end up with a Corvette....

    I know what you are saying about investing in good quality parts, and you have a point. Most of the parts that you have mentioned though I can't imagine being of any lower quality then what comes on most run of the mill store bought gutiars. The thing is though, you can always buy some nice bridge or pickups, and build a guitar, then maybe learn a lot, and decide for #2 to recycle the bits from the first guitar if it didn't turn out so good...If you have come this far into considering building a guitar, who says you need to stop at one....and you probably wont. Parts are interchangable which is the beauty of the solid body electric guitar...
     
  13. Zmatko

    Zmatko Tele-Meister

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    What most said here, it's fun to build.
    Poly if you feel that there's a special kind of wood you want to build off then the more reason to do so! Trust me, you'll love it.

    If you have a woodworking spade and a telecaster body template then it's easy, the neck pocket is fit and finish with a spade and neck in hand.
     
  14. polymolly

    polymolly Tele-Meister

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    What's a "woodworking spade"? to know someone with good woodworking skills, or does at mean "you if suck at woodworking, dig up a hole and stay there!"?:confused:

    I'm thinking about using norway spruce or a pine spieces used in portuguese guitar building known as "flandres pine".

    Got an email from Ron, I imagine him in an alley calling: "pstt! wanna get adicted to tele?" (no offense, but you got me addicted! THANKS!!!)
     
  15. Zmatko

    Zmatko Tele-Meister

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    That Ron Kirn comment sure made me snigger! :lol:

    no but really, here's spade bits, eventually it's better to use handheld chisels first few builds (i know you want it!), safe and sound.

    http://www.handtools-china.com/images/SpadeBit_7093.jpg
     
  16. polymolly

    polymolly Tele-Meister

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    oh! "THESE" spade bits...:oops:
     
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