TLDR (an English teacher's rant)

tery

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nvilletele

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That falls in the same manners category as playing "grammar police", which is also poor form.

Poor form perhaps, but I find it surprising that no one has yet, in the five pages following your post, had the balls to point out that the comma should have been inside the quotes, i.e., ”. . . as playing “grammar police,” which is also poor form.”
 

teleplayr

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Decades ago in English class our teacher made a comment that people that say "Um" during a conversation have nothing to say.

She hit the nail on the head.
 

Blrfl

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I just don't want someone's TLDR comment directed at some poor grammer to squelch anyone's efforts at developing ther own literacy.

TL;DR started life as a criticism ("you wrote more than I'm willing to read") and evolved to have multiple meanings depending on the context. Sometimes it's criticism, the abstract the original writer left out or someone's way of saying they didn't read the whole thing but felt the need to comment anyway. It can be used for ridicule, but so can a lot of other things: "you're overweight" is just fine between a doctor and patient but not so much between middle schoolers. At any rate, if a TL;DR stunts someone's literacy, they probably have bigger problems.

Just about every scholarly paper I've read starts with a TL;DR, albeit with with different branding (Abstract). Nobody bats an eye over the practice. Whether provided by the original writer or someone else, abstracts and TL;DRs help conserve time, a resource that becomes more-precious as I age.


I know the medium is the message, and the tweetmosphere promotes short messages, but for pity's sake, the longest posts possible on TDPRI are short pieces of writing.

There's nothing wrong with very-short-form writing. If you can make a solid point within the bounds of a tweet, great. That's the epitome of Antoine Saint Exupéry's observation that perfection is reached not when you run out of things to add but when you run out of things to remove.

I am hopeful that, rather than destroying mass literacy as we once knew it, the worldwide web, our new mass medium of information and communication, is able to develop its own mass literacy where complex language (= complex thought) is allowed to do its thing.

Complex language doesn't automatically mean complex thought was behind it. Some people use it to hide a lack of substance, such as those who'd rather communicate with individuals regarding their vehicles instead of talking to people about their cars. Others use it to make their material inaccessible to those who could understand it but aren't willing to wade through the language.

I work in a technical field and spend a lot of my day reading material on technical topics. The best of it is short, sweet and to-the-point. It's also often informally-written.
 

THX1123

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TL;DR started life as a criticism ("you wrote more than I'm willing to read") and evolved to have multiple meanings depending on the context. Sometimes it's criticism, the abstract the original writer left out or someone's way of saying they didn't read the whole thing but felt the need to comment anyway. It can be used for ridicule, but so can a lot of other things: "you're overweight" is just fine between a doctor and patient but not so much between middle schoolers. At any rate, if a TL;DR stunts someone's literacy, they probably have bigger problems.

Just about every scholarly paper I've read starts with a TL;DR, albeit with with different branding (Abstract). Nobody bats an eye over the practice. Whether provided by the original writer or someone else, abstracts and TL;DRs help conserve time, a resource that becomes more-precious as I age.




There's nothing wrong with very-short-form writing. If you can make a solid point within the bounds of a tweet, great. That's the epitome of Antoine Saint Exupéry's observation that perfection is reached not when you run out of things to add but when you run out of things to remove.



Complex language doesn't automatically mean complex thought was behind it. Some people use it to hide a lack of substance, such as those who'd rather communicate with individuals regarding their vehicles instead of talking to people about their cars. Others use it to make their material inaccessible to those who could understand it but aren't willing to wade through the language.

I work in a technical field and spend a lot of my day reading material on technical topics. The best of it is short, sweet and to-the-point. It's also often informally-written.
Suppose I just typed TL;DR because I decided your post above wasn't worth reading because you couldn't make your point in two sentences and because it made me feel cheaply superior to try to annoy you.

That's not exactly the same as a 6-7 sentence Abstract on a paper.
 

Blrfl

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Suppose I just typed TL;DR because I decided your post above wasn't worth reading because you couldn't make your point in two sentences and because it made me feel cheaply superior to try to annoy you.

That's not exactly the same as a 6-7 sentence Abstract on a paper.

That's two different uses.

Whatever your motivation, "TL;DR" alone is criticism: "Too long; didn't read."

"TL;DR: Set the bias between pairs in your amp as closely as possible" is an abstract.
 

THX1123

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TL;DR: Not replying at all is more difficult for the boorish than reading a few hundred words, and critical thinking.

You are right. Those are two different uses.

The difference is that one use is not exclusively a valid criticism. It is frequently intended to show contempt in the laziest manner possible - which I took as central to the OP's meaning.
 

mad dog

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There are many times I don't read a post, or skim lightly. Could be lack of interest, reaction to poor/no writing style, unreadable formats (all caps, no paragraphs, for example.) It's never out of laziness. Were I lazy, I would not brag about it.
 

Silent Otto

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I didn't go through the whole thread, because, you know, too long....

As for myself, I've learned not to correct anyone's grammar, spelling, usage, syntax, malapropism, pronunciation, intonation, diction, omission, contraction or other language deficiencies, unless they are paying customers. 🤓
 

Burlington Dave

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Congrats! I spent a few hours today at a retirement lunch. A former colleague who was in attendance was warning me about the boredom of retirement. I smiled politely, but nope. I yearn for the day when I can sit on my deck with absolutely nothing to do and no worry about the next work crisis.
I am not the type to get bored! I have 2 side hustles, home renos, a music community, travel, and volunteering opportunities, and I’m going to supply (substitute) teach a copy days a week, and I can sit on my patio for a coffee or a drink on my schedule, not someone else’s!
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My last grad ceremony after 32 years of teaching…my graduation to retirement!🙂
 

Spox

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TL;DR started life as a criticism ("you wrote more than I'm willing to read") and evolved to have multiple meanings depending on the context. Sometimes it's criticism, the abstract the original writer left out or someone's way of saying they didn't read the whole thing but felt the need to comment anyway. It can be used for ridicule, but so can a lot of other things: "you're overweight" is just fine between a doctor and patient but not so much between middle schoolers. At any rate, if a TL;DR stunts someone's literacy, they probably have bigger problems.

Just about every scholarly paper I've read starts with a TL;DR, albeit with with different branding (Abstract). Nobody bats an eye over the practice. Whether provided by the original writer or someone else, abstracts and TL;DRs help conserve time, a resource that becomes more-precious as I age.




There's nothing wrong with very-short-form writing. If you can make a solid point within the bounds of a tweet, great. That's the epitome of Antoine Saint Exupéry's observation that perfection is reached not when you run out of things to add but when you run out of things to remove.



Complex language doesn't automatically mean complex thought was behind it. Some people use it to hide a lack of substance, such as those who'd rather communicate with individuals regarding their vehicles instead of talking to people about their cars. Others use it to make their material inaccessible to those who could understand it but aren't willing to wade through the language.

I work in a technical field and spend a lot of my day reading material on technical topics. The best of it is short, sweet and to-the-point. It's also often informally-written.
I'm just finishing my dinner and laughed so hard at your avatar that I nearly choked on a piece of fussili.

I keep two 35mm film tubs full of sticky on eyes in my pocket and use them on things like gig posters when I am out and, imo, the people I stick them onto usually look better for it.
 




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