TLDR (an English teacher's rant)

bottlenecker

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I've seen it used to preface a summary, as a substitute for "cliff's notes".

I've also seen it used as a response to a long, poorly written, self indulgent, unedited spew. I don't believe I've used it in this way, but I've not been bothered by it in these instances. I couldn't use tldr honestly when I read the whole thing, so maybe I need TLRTWA (too long resented the writer afterwards) to be a thing.

I've also seen it after well written, detailed posts, and now I feel glad I'm no one's english teacher. I'm sure it's a frustrating job.
 

teletimetx

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Everything must be reduced to 280 characters to be follower worthy.

“…it can be hard to tell these days when everyone films, photographs, and documents their whole life as if every individual were their own television channel.” *

Interesting to observe your own children beginning to provide the same advice they received once upon a time, but as if they invented on their own.

Even reduced to 140 characters, it’s never really a zero sum game.

*Fredrik Bachman, “Anxious People”, originally published in Swedish as Folk med Angst. Highly recommended.
 

FSRCustomTeleHHGT

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anti intellectualism is as american as hot dogs and apple pie unfortunately. I appreciate anyone who swims against the tide, but realize it is a steep climb to ask people to ease off the reductive, bumper sticker sloganeering that poses as actual thought.

Wil Durant would struggle in the Twitter era.
Anti-intellectualism knows no national borders, unfortunately. And bashing the younger generation for their apparent lack of... you name it, is one of the oldest, and yes most lazy things us older folks have done prolly (yes, I know) since the invention of language. I spent a fair amount of time reading New York-area newspapers from the 1840s to 1860s about a decade ago for a project I was working on, and that same attitude regarding the younger generation prevailed then as now. As we age, we tend to forget what idiots we and our friends were at that age, and we also forget that language evolves over time. We don't speak English as the English did in the 15th Century, and we'd have a hard time understanding what they were saying if we suddenly encountered such people. "Ain't" wasn't "in the dictionary" when I was a kid. It is now. Some like to think that the way they learned English is absolutely correct and any new variation that appears is wrong. But that is not how language works. Most innovations in communications, unfortunately, are opposed by the supposed guardians of grammar. They should be excited about such evolutionary developments if they really love language, but the masses always win such battles in the end. And that's how it should be.

I very much appreciate people who take the time to put a tl;dr summary on their long post, but I appreciate it even more when they lead with that because otherwise I end up reading the entire post and it becomes superfluous. And I HATE things that are superfluous. 🤪
 

colchar

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Bulk-purchase, big bag of nuts to everyone who posts this arrogant, ignorant little snidety on anyone's post about anything.

These are the letters that will go on the flag of the Aliteracy Movement, the organization promoting the interests of people who can read and write, but who choose not to.

You want to belong to that group, fine. You choose then to stunt your own development. But why promote that stunting in others?

It's a rude, snotty comment, and it doesn't reflect well upon you, so please refrain from making it. This public service rant is brought to you on behalf of your English teacher, whoever s/he was.


Get over yourself.

I'm an English professor and it doesn't bother me one bit. In fact, it is often helpful when one does not want to read through an overly long post that might not be of even the remotest interest. In those cases, TLDR and the summary provided are a godsend. Think of them as the abstract for an article.
 

getbent

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Anti-intellectualism knows no national borders, unfortunately. And bashing the younger generation for their apparent lack of... you name it, is one of the oldest, and yes most lazy things us older folks have done prolly (yes, I know) since the invention of language. I spent a fair amount of time reading New York-area newspapers from the 1840s to 1860s about a decade ago for a project I was working on, and that same attitude regarding the younger generation prevailed then as now. As we age, we tend to forget what idiots we and our friends were at that age, and we also forget that language evolves over time. We don't speak English as the English did in the 15th Century, and we'd have a hard time understanding what they were saying if we suddenly encountered such people. "Ain't" wasn't "in the dictionary" when I was a kid. It is now. Some like to think that the way they learned English is absolutely correct and any new variation that appears is wrong. But that is not how language works. Most innovations in communications, unfortunately, are opposed by the supposed guardians of grammar. They should be excited about such evolutionary developments if they really love language, but the masses always win such battles in the end. And that's how it should be.

I very much appreciate people who take the time to put a tl;dr summary on their long post, but I appreciate it even more when they lead with that because otherwise I end up reading the entire post and it becomes superfluous. And I HATE things that are superfluous. 🤪
you misread my very very very short and concise note. YOU (somehow) inferred that I was classifying the young. You'll note, through re-reading, I make no such implication. As to whether or not there are borders to anti intellectualism, again, you make that YOUR takeaway, when it has zero to do with the reality that the US has always been anti intellectual.

As to the rest of your 'points'... they wander and miss the mark.

Good for you on reading old newspapers. That sounds like it wasn't fun, but you did it.
 

FSRCustomTeleHHGT

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you misread my very very very short and concise note. YOU (somehow) inferred that I was classifying the young. You'll note, through re-reading, I make no such implication. As to whether or not there are borders to anti intellectualism, again, you make that YOUR takeaway, when it has zero to do with the reality that the US has always been anti intellectual.

As to the rest of your 'points'... they wander and miss the mark.

Good for you on reading old newspapers. That sounds like it wasn't fun, but you did it.
Sorry! No, I didn't mean that you did. I can see how it reads that way. I was really replying to all that I had read above and not just your post. Again, my apologies sir!

But I have a degree in history, and anti-intellectualism in Europe was a primary cause to the two world wars. It is not an American exclusivity. As an American, I am as troubled by it as you are (and I too read Richard Hofstadter -- I mean it was required). But I know enough about the rest of the world to know that it exists everywhere.

The rest of my points were on point and correct, by the way. It's hilarious to have someone both bringing up anti-intellectualism and questioning those points. Also: "American" should be capitalized, and it's "Will" Durant. I was going to let those go, but...
 

Peegoo

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This post is a personal affront to my beloved fraternity. It runs counter to everything we stand for--which includes the acceptance of using a preposition at the end of a phrase or sentence.

Label me triggered!

peegoos-frat-house-alka-hall.jpg
 

colchar

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But I have a degree in history

Congrats. I have a BA and MA in History, and will complete my PhD within the next 18 months. My specialty is modern British military history so I am more than a little acquainted with the world wars.

And yes, I did mention above that I am an English prof because I am. It is college logic to have the guy with History degrees teaching English, but since they pay me the same as when I teach History I don't care.


anti-intellectualism in Europe was a primary cause to the two world wars.


Um no, it wasn't. Intellectuals actively supported WW I as they believed that society needed to be renewed, and that the only way to do that was through war. Go read Stromberg's Redemption by War (among others) then rethink your claim about anti-intellectualism causing the wars.
 

colchar

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This post is a personal affront to my beloved fraternity. It runs counter to everything we stand for--which includes the acceptance of using a preposition at the end of a phrase or sentence.


Funnily enough, there isn't actually any proscription against ending a sentence with a preposition in English. That is a holdover from Latin grammar and far too many people teaching English, who didn't actually know the rules of grammar, taught that as if it applied to English too. It didn't, and never has. But enough of them taught it that it came to be thought to be true.
 




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