Time & Rhythm, 20th Century America, & Things Famous Rockers/Jazzers/Shredders Miss

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by deytookerjaabs, Jan 14, 2016.

  1. slowpinky

    slowpinky Tele-Afflicted

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    Just further to that - also being a huge Yes fan, getting used to listening to Yes opened doors to much of the experimental and modern jazz stuff I encountered later on - especially stuff like late Coltrane, Terje Rypdal and Weather Report.
     
  2. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    17:00 to about 19:00 - talk about being 'in the zone'.

    *And besides all the musical 'high adventure' ... they friggin sing ... in harmony!!!

    Great little doc overall. Never seen it. Thanks!
     
  3. studio

    studio Poster Extraordinaire

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    Yeah, it's probably just the familiarity of the music.
    I didn't think about it either until this thread.

    But I do put Howe's guitar in that Clapton/Cream category
    of being ahead of the game at times and spot on when he
    needs to be.
     
  4. teleforumnoob

    teleforumnoob Friend of Leo's

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    As primarily as bass player I feel this issue in my gut every time I step in with a new situation. I Spent my first yrs in bluegrass. No drummer. You get the feel from the mandolin chop and the guitar, and also how hard driving the banjo player is. My first group was a buncha 20-30 somethings and our heros were the new grass guys, New Grass Revival, Old and In The Way, Rice, Grissman. Guess who we sounded like? Then I went on to play in a couple of groups from the generation just behind me. Their heroes were Stanley's, Flatt n Scruggs, Osborne Bros, etc. It took me a while to get to where they were at but I learned so much about the basics. Still Bluegrass, a lot of the same material, but a totally different feel and time.
    Then there were all those jam sessions with anybody and everybody. You can tell right away if they've really listened and studied the masters or are just dabblers in the genre.
     
  5. GuitOp81

    GuitOp81 Tele-Holic

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    It's the second thing you said
     
  6. niilolainen

    niilolainen Tele-Meister

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    Nicd thread!
     
  7. studio

    studio Poster Extraordinaire

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    Oh I agree 100%.

    Steve Howe is by far in the top 3 of my favorite guitarists.

    The other two positions vary, but Steve Howe is a mainstay
    on that list of mine.
     
  8. Bendyha

    Bendyha Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    This has been the at the core of musical developement and the basis interpretational dispute since caveman banged a log.
    The transition from one musical era to the next, from ancient to medieval to renaissance to baroque to classical to romantic up to the 1900's you mention.
    The regional differences alone within each of these eras was manifold.

    Hektor Berlioz writing of the pianist Frederic Chopin & violinist Heinrich Wilhelm Ernst in the 1830's -
    "Chopin chafed under the restraints of time, and to my mind pushed rhythmic freedom much too far. Ernst can take liberties with the beat when artistic reasons demand it, but he is essentially a rhythmical player; there is steadiness at the heart of his most daring fancies. Chopin simply could not play in strict time; Ernst is capable of abandoning strict time, but only so that the underlying pulse may be felt all the more strongly when he returns to it."

    I am very fond of Harpsichord music, and if one listens to a work such as J.S.Bach BWV 903 Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue in D minor as played by different players, the difference can be huge, anything between flat and uninspiring, to emotionally daunting. With a work like that, dozens of different but still compelling interpretations are to be heard, but most listeners will manage to choose a version that they would say is there favourite, and most would concede to the fact that others would beg to differ. I for one would choose George Malcolm.
     
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