TICKET PRICES TO SEE THE BOSS IN 2023.

jrblue

Friend of Leo's
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Nov 14, 2010
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Santa Barbara
Yes. I detest the fact that the good seats go mostly to people expensing them, or who are just effing loaded, or who just fling money around. I don't know who gets a cut of those final prices, but it's obviously ludicrous that a computerized selling system is hardly some brilliant service. I live outside LA, and ticket distribution there seems obviously corrupt rather than even-handed and fair. Some smaller venues still offer great artists are manageable prices, but looking at the LA Forum on Ticketmaster make you want to puke. I belong to a few band and venue fan clubs, and those sometimes yield early access or even special seating. But when the Hollywood Bowl wants to charge you massively for flopping on the grass a mile away from the performer, you know it's a sleazy business.
 

KokoTele

Doctor of Teleocity
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albany, ny [not chicago]
Does the artist benefit from the dynamic pricing? Getting all or part of above face value price? As above, TM and artists figured out that if scalpers could get big bucks, then jack up ticket prices.

For big stadium concerts, which party takes the risk? The artist? Or does a promoter pay a flat fee to the artist?

I am spending $25 to see Dream Syndicate in a club this week. Bought the tic direct from the venue via phone, skipping the ticket service add on fees.

Things are getting slippery these days as business models are still changing, but in a traditional deal there are 3 main parties involved in a show: the artist, the promoter, and the venue. The venue has a schedule of fees for the rental, and has line items for the facility, for any equipment used (even if it's permanently installed and the band *has* to use it), personnel, box office, etc. They even get a percentage of the artist's merchandise sales. They have very little risk.

The artist will get a guarantee plus a large percentage of ticket sales (80% is common). I don't know what Springsteen's guarantee is for a night, but I imagine it's in the 6 figure range. From that money, they pay the band, their touring staff, management, production company, etc.

The promoter gets the remaining percentage of ticket sales, and from that they have to pay the venue, advertising, staff, ticket fees, catering, event & liability insurance, etc. They also often have to pay for the band's hotel rooms and meals. This is all negotiable, so the final deal depends on how the parties negotiate, but this is a pretty standard starting point. There are some nuances to how expenses are shared, but this will give you the gist of it.

For an artist like Springsteen that can count on selling out, it's likely that none of the parties have that much risk. In a smaller show that won't sell out, almost all of the risk is carried by the promoter. The venue is getting their fees and the artist is getting their guarantee, plus lodging and meals, even if nobody comes to the show. That leaves the promoter to pay the bills.

The ticket processor (i.e. Ticketmaster) makes their money either as a flat fee, a percentage of the ticket sales, or a combination. So with this dynamic pricing driving up the ticket costs, Ticketmaster, Springsteen, and the promoter all benefit from the higher prices.

Ticketing for any type of major event is a mystery to me. There are times over the years I have tried to buy tix for something and it seemed like every seat in the house was available for sale on the secondary market (at a huge markup, of course). It has made me wonder:
a) so basically modern-day "scalpers" are somehow buying every seat? How do they accomplish this and why do venues not do more to prevent it?
and (b) are there really are that many people out there willing to spend so much more than box office face-value? (which is pretty friggin high to begin with)

A) Yes. They're smart with technology, and sometimes pay people in 2nd-world countries to act like people when they can't get around the technology. Some artists are true scumbags and have their own side hustle buying up all those tickets themselves and scalping them to fans on StubHub, etc.

B) Also yes. When I tried to buy tickets this morning, the venue was more than 1/2 sold based just on the presale, and the prices were insane.
 

Marc Morfei

Friend of Leo's
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Wilmington, DE
Things are getting slippery these days as business models are still changing, but in a traditional deal there are 3 main parties involved in a show: the artist, the promoter, and the venue. The venue has a schedule of fees for the rental, and has line items for the facility, for any equipment used (even if it's permanently installed and the band *has* to use it), personnel, box office, etc. They even get a percentage of the artist's merchandise sales. They have very little risk.

The artist will get a guarantee plus a large percentage of ticket sales (80% is common). I don't know what Springsteen's guarantee is for a night, but I imagine it's in the 6 figure range. From that money, they pay the band, their touring staff, management, production company, etc.

The promoter gets the remaining percentage of ticket sales, and from that they have to pay the venue, advertising, staff, ticket fees, catering, event & liability insurance, etc. They also often have to pay for the band's hotel rooms and meals. This is all negotiable, so the final deal depends on how the parties negotiate, but this is a pretty standard starting point. There are some nuances to how expenses are shared, but this will give you the gist of it.

For an artist like Springsteen that can count on selling out, it's likely that none of the parties have that much risk. In a smaller show that won't sell out, almost all of the risk is carried by the promoter. The venue is getting their fees and the artist is getting their guarantee, plus lodging and meals, even if nobody comes to the show. That leaves the promoter to pay the bills.

The ticket processor (i.e. Ticketmaster) makes their money either as a flat fee, a percentage of the ticket sales, or a combination. So with this dynamic pricing driving up the ticket costs, Ticketmaster, Springsteen, and the promoter all benefit from the higher prices.



A) Yes. They're smart with technology, and sometimes pay people in 2nd-world countries to act like people when they can't get around the technology. Some artists are true scumbags and have their own side hustle buying up all those tickets themselves and scalping them to fans on StubHub, etc.

B) Also yes. When I tried to buy tickets this morning, the venue was more than 1/2 sold based just on the presale, and the prices were insane.
So if you boil it down to the most overly-simplified terms possible: the promoter is renting the venue, paying the artist, and selling tickets to recoup those costs and hopefully make a profit. Yes?
 

Toto'sDad

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Bakersfield
I cordially invite Mr. Springstein to my home where I will provide him with one (1) burrito, and four (4) tater tots, and one (1) cup of coffee, and one (1) refill for one thousand nine hundred, seventy-six dollars, and seventy-three cents. Reservations' must be made ninety-two days in advance and will depend entirely on my availability to entertain on any particular day, and or, whether I am open to having company at the time.
 

Marc Morfei

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I cordially invite Mr. Springstein to my home where I will provide him with one (1) burrito, and four (4) tater tots, and one (1) cup of coffee, and one (1) refill for one thousand nine hundred, seventy-six dollars, and seventy-three cents. Reservations' must be made ninety-two days in advance and will depend entirely on my availability to entertain on any particular day, and or, whether I am open to having company at the time.
Congratulations, you are now a concert promoter.
 

radtz

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Joined
May 30, 2021
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1,193
Location
Wisconsin, USA
I cordially invite Mr. Springstein to my home where I will provide him with one (1) burrito, and four (4) tater tots, and one (1) cup of coffee, and one (1) refill for one thousand nine hundred, seventy-six dollars, and seventy-three cents. Reservations' must be made ninety-two days in advance and will depend entirely on my availability to entertain on any particular day, and or, whether I am open to having company at the time.
Why only 4 tator tots? That's gonna be the deal killer.
 

Mark617

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Jan 24, 2021
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Massachusetts
I loved Bruce back in the day. Darkness being my favorite, just for reference. But I’m not paying $650 and bringing can goods, to hear his views. Mr Blue Collar is gone. His daughter is an Olympic Equestrian 😂.Don’t give me your tales of woe brotha
 

kookaburra

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Green Bay, WI, States
It is what it is. I’ve been going to smaller venues that feature local, regional, and low key national bands for many years at this point.

I’m happy with that.
 

TwoBear

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Mar 31, 2020
Posts
2,398
Location
oc. CA.
I tried to get some here in Denver.You had to sign up for a list,then get a code,then get in line.I signed on right away,2000+ people before me.Tickets in front of soundboard were $1300.00 before fees and taxes,ect.Seats behind stage at the highest level were $89,and tickets opposite the stage at highest level were $129.and then all the fees,handling fee,parking fee,fees just because,fees for security.I wanted to see Bruce again,but he's nuts charging that.Wonder what the scalpers are going to ask for?Blue collar Bruce?HA!
….‘You had to sign up for a list, then get a code… then get in line.I signed on right away,2000+ people before me….$1300.00 before fees and taxes,etc.” ….

These are excerpts from your thread I was reading—

I was afraid I had pushed the back arrow inadvertently, and was reading a thread about Klons or Analogman Kot!! Ha!
 

bottlenecker

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Dec 6, 2015
Posts
6,233
Location
Wisconsin
Presale for verified fans happened for my venue this morning. There are so many people buying tickets that I was watching the dynamic pricing in action. Every time I viewed a section, prices would change. It's a 35,000 seat venue, and 2 tickets in the center section of the balcony were $1k each. Single tickets in that section were $100.

This is beyond insanity!

But Hey! Financing is available!

View attachment 1007777


Just saw this No Depression article about springsteen prices and ticketmaster. All the good venues I used to play in my own town are owned by ticketmaster now, so the people here who care about music are making new ones. I really wish someone with springsteen power would throw a wrench in their gears.
 

telleutelleme

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Jan 15, 2010
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22,614
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Houston
I cordially invite Mr. Springstein to my home where I will provide him with one (1) burrito, and four (4) tater tots, and one (1) cup of coffee, and one (1) refill for one thousand nine hundred, seventy-six dollars, and seventy-three cents. Reservations' must be made ninety-two days in advance and will depend entirely on my availability to entertain on any particular day, and or, whether I am open to having company at the time.
Can't wait to see the Boss's Tater-Tot T-Shirts with "Sponsored by @Toto'sDad " emblazoned on the front.
 




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