Three-quarter size teles, strats???

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by Rod Parsons, Dec 30, 2017.

  1. Rod Parsons

    Rod Parsons Friend of Leo's

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    I need to buy a small guitar for my 7 year old grandson. I have seen the squire mini-strats, and they look pretty cool, but I haven't seen others, that are made for child's hands. A mini-tele would be cool,... or anything 'mini', to compare them to.. I can tweak the playability. Something to inspire him would be best, of course.. Next are his two younger sisters, who will get it next, in turn, when grandson gets an upgrade. I thought I would ask here??? Thanks!
     
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  2. Crobbins

    Crobbins Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    I bought a mini Squire strat for my grandson. Plays good. No problems..
     
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  3. titan uranus

    titan uranus Tele-Meister

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    Some guys I used to play with had a couple of ¾ size Strats for their female chorus line to use as stage props. They did mention that they were surprised by how well the minis actually played.
     
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  4. Zepfan

    Zepfan Poster Extraordinaire

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    Might also consider a 4-string Tenor guitar/CBG/Loog/Ukulele to start him off on.
     
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  5. bender66

    bender66 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Rondo had 3/4 size Liquids if the grandson likes the "funny shapes".
     
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  6. TeleAndSG

    TeleAndSG Tele-Afflicted

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    Squier minis have a 22.75 scale. I would also take a look at the Ibanez Mikro series (22.2 scale). I think it would be a good idea to let your grandson choose which one he likes best.
     
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  7. 41144

    41144 Tele-Afflicted

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  8. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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  9. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    Washburn made some guitars branded Washburn very similar to the Hannah Montana electric Tele they made for Disney, 22.5in scale all of them.

    Squier Bullet Indonesian made with the fixed bridge is full scale but but the neck carves are thin and the bodies are smaller. Quality of the build is excellent. Squier HH Mustangs are another option in this regular scale but thin all over.

    Don't be too worried about full sized instruments and little kids, as the second video shows.




    .
     
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  10. Rod Parsons

    Rod Parsons Friend of Leo's

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    Those kids playing so well on those huge, [to them], guitars was amazing to watch... Thanks! I may have to re-think the 'small' guitar idea. I'll see how he likes my white blonde,Squier CV-50 Tele neck. It's kinda' smallish..... Yes! I'll do that first.. Great idea, ... again, thanks!
     
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  11. TeleAndSG

    TeleAndSG Tele-Afflicted

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    Oh by the way, the Jackson Minion guitars have a 22.5 scale. And they look nice.
     
  12. Brendan

    Brendan Tele-Holic

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    The SX 3/4 scale guitars at Rondo and decent. I bought one and it needed nothing. I enjoyed the 24" scale, but the nut felt a little narrow. Fine for someone with smaller hands though.
     
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  13. Rick330man

    Rick330man Tele-Afflicted

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    I bought a 3/4 scale Squier Strat years ago as a gift for one of my sons who wanted to learn to play guitar. I replaced the bridge pick-up with a coil-tapped Seymour Duncan mini-59, set up the guitar for .11/.48s and the darn thing sounded very respectable.

    Years later, after my son "outgrew" it, I polished up the 3/4 scale Squier Strat and gave it to the young son of an acquaintance (single mom). The boy really wanted to learn to play guitar but his mom couldn't afford the basic gear. I hope that guitar continues to bring smiles to many more budding guitarists.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2017
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  14. johnboy99

    johnboy99 Tele-Meister

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    Perhaps something to consider, If this will be his first guitar to learn on, you might consider a small acoustic nylon string guitar as its a little easier on those small uncalloused fingers while learning to play. I bought a 1/2 size classical for my nephew when he was about that age for about $50 and it was decent after a setup. Also, with an acoustic, he won't be able to crank the vol up and make too much noise, but that's a discussion for you and his parents to have.:eek:

    Either way, it's great to get the next generation playing. Hopefully he will stick with it and you guys can jam one day.
     
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  15. Cellordin

    Cellordin TDPRI Member

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    Well, I have some recent experience here; as mentioned in another thread Santa Claus delivered a Washburn Hannah Montana for our nearly-6yo, who I guess is quite slightly built for her age.

    I've been trying to get her started on some "3-string chords", with the three bass strings muted using a piece of velcro (learned this from a guitar teacher's website), and it's been a bit of a struggle. She can sort of fret the notes cleanly, but she struggles to balance the guitar whilst seated, and finds it too heavy (!) while standing. The action is as low as I could get it, there's even a bit of buzz on the D string at the 11th (I figured the 11th wasn't important for now!).

    I think electrics are probably better than steel string acoustics for small hands, the action is generally lower - and can be easily adjusted. Nylon strings are OK too, but not really for "rocking out".

    Prior to the arrival of the HM, she had been playing my Seagull Merlin with some success, this has fairly low action and of course no "wrong notes".

    Having reconsidered, the HM will be going on loan to her older sister for a while, and I have ordered one of these from eBay.

    s-l1600.jpg

    This is a tenor uke, 17" scale length. Clearwater is a UK company that rebadges stuff from China, I suspect there will be many US equivalents.

    These are also available as a thinline, or even in Strat or Les Paul formation in the event that you like your guitars to be the wrong shape. There are more expensive European-made alternatives from a company called "Risa", who appear to make a range of travel ukes too.

    My initial plan is to only put three strings on it, tuned GBE, and add the low D when we get to that page in the book! Note that this requires using guitar strings rather than the standard ukulele set.

    I think if it wasn't for the "balance" issue, I'd have gone for the cheaper solution of putting a capo at the fifth fret or so and starting from there. In fact, I remember a classical guitar teacher I had when I was about 10 starting new students with simple melodies in C major using the notes between 3rd string 5th fret and 1st string eighth fret.
     
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  16. Sparky2

    Sparky2 Friend of Leo's

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    Oh man, that Clearwater uke is so nice!!
    :)
     
  17. Cellordin

    Cellordin TDPRI Member

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  18. ScribbleSomething

    ScribbleSomething Tele-Holic

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    I got a Squier mini for my 8 year old. It plays very nice after I did some basic setup. Even stays in tune with 10's in standard.

    His baby brother has played the guitar more than he has, but that's a different story.

    I really dig those electric ukes. Though the Risas are about 10 times the price I paid for the mini-start.

    Here's that first Uke available at AMS

    https://www.americanmusical.com/Item--i-VOR-FTLUK3BK
     
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  19. ricardo1912

    ricardo1912 Tele-Afflicted

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    Now I need an electric uke :)
     
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  20. Cellordin

    Cellordin TDPRI Member

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    You know, I'm actually a "passable" uke player, but I've never been all that keen on electrics, or for that matter tenors, so this is a double first for me too (the Mahalo tele-uke in my avatar is an abomination, in case you were thinking about investing the £25 or whatever they cost).

    The $64,000 question, or rather the $115 question, is of course whether I end up disposing of it once it has served its initial purpose!
     
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