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This One Blew My Mind It Was So Good

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Toast, Nov 24, 2020.

  1. Toast

    Toast Tele-Afflicted

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    There are a ton of great lessons out there on Youtube, but this one connected a lot of dots for me. I like a lot of Stich's lessons. I've seen other people post links to good lessons and I appreciate them. Feel free to post some more if you have any favorites.

     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2020
  2. SRHmusic

    SRHmusic Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Yeah, that's pretty good on a a few levels. That's actually quite a lot of musical 'meat' that even just-past-beginner guitarists could start to get into and make things more interesting while actually thinking musically. I like that he's talking about the intervals, especially, and not just "press this string at this fret" (/rant ... which drives me insane - painting by numbers /rant off :p).
     
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  3. StevesBoogie

    StevesBoogie Tele-Holic

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    Nicely done. Audio level, camera zooming on fretboard, and the periodic inset of the fret diagram, all makes for a great lesson. Thanks for sharing.
     
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  4. Toast

    Toast Tele-Afflicted

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    I often play chords only knowing where their root notes are. This lesson helped me start getting into their anatomy. I had thought about all the different elements of the lesson (intervals, pentatonic shapes, chord shapes) individually, but I liked the lesson because it tied them all together into a practice that I could use to cement them into my thinking.
     
  5. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Here's another good one by Jeff Schneider on improvisation, though not specifically for guitar. It provides a good way to get started without focusing on scales and modes in favor of chord tones. It nicely complements Stich's approach. It starts out with a little too much talk, but is worth sticking with.

     
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  6. SRHmusic

    SRHmusic Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    That's great, and I don't mean to dismiss getting into guitar any way one can. In fact it's a good instrument to start with a very mechanical approach.

    However, I learned far too many years later that by not forcing myself to pay attention to intervals or diatonic harmony, etc. that I had lost probably 15 or 20 years of potential progress in understanding music and taking it to the next levels. (I can figure out songs in detail by ear and read pretty well, but didn't understand the real music part of it until about 10 years ago. So it's frustrating to see thousands of videos that avoid exactly what was critical to real progress for me.)
     
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  7. Toast

    Toast Tele-Afflicted

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    For me it's about learning the vocabulary of music I've already heard hundreds of times. Knowing what to call things I have a familiarity with allows me to organize those things and think about them. As far as taking music to the next level, it doesn't really apply to my learning. I'm enjoying intermediate musical discoveries as much as I enjoyed learning my first chords. For me it's simply about having new discoveries. In other words, learning new musical concepts are ends in themselves. I'm not really on any timeline where I reach a certain point by a certain time. That's just how I roll.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2020
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  8. Toast

    Toast Tele-Afflicted

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    Good video, thanks for linking it. I enjoyed it. I think my thoughts are frequently aligned with his. I'm exploring consonance, for the most part, because that's the direction my meager improvisation skills seem to lead me. Playing chord tones already feels natural. Dissonance certainly draws my interest, but using dissonant tones is like like learning how to add exotic spices to a recipe. It takes some trial and error to get them to your taste.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2020
  9. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    I'm not sure that I understand what you mean. Are you saying that you could reproduce music by playing notes and chords, but had no real understanding of why they worked?
     
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  10. SRHmusic

    SRHmusic Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Yes, I could play all sorts of songs quite accurately, but not improvise or solo. I knew CAGED related major and a few minor scales, pentatonics, lots of chords and arps, just not how to use them musically.

    I had some formal lessons on and off, but I now see they all missed some aspects of 'practical' theory. I basically hit a wall with each type of music I was working on over the years: rock, classical, jazz.

    Once I started going to a local blues jam I was motivated to dig into 'what works and why' and the lights came on pretty quickly. The wall was theory, but specifically:
    - paying attention to the chord changes (and common chord changes, etc.)
    - paying attention to what notes sound good, what they are in terms of the key and chord(s) and scales
    Then going back over songs I knew all sorts of things started making sense, I had a framework for easily memorizing chord changes, figuring out more complex tunes, and I started making real progress on improvisation.

    This is probably mundane for people that go to real music schools and dig into composition, and looking back I do see mention of these things in several places, but I was never pushed specifically to dig into these two things. There is a lot to cover in learning a guitar - so it's understandable. It's more general music than guitar technique, I suppose. Not sure if this is like, "Yeah you missed it, dude" or "Yeah, it's a common problem." But I'm happy to share some specifics if anyone wants some one on one discussion, etc.
     
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  11. ladave

    ladave Tele-Holic

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    Thanks for posting. I've gotten a lot out of a few of his videos but had not seen this one.
     
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  12. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Thanks for replying. I’ve had some of the same issues.

    We each have our own set of blind spots, knowledge gaps, inhibitions, mental blocks and disabilities, and a few things that we do well or learn more easily. Taking guitar lessons after 40 years of teaching myself was very helpful. Playing with better musicians in a particular genre is also a good way to learn.
     
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  13. SRHmusic

    SRHmusic Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Right - didn't mean to imply I had a timeline in mind. This is just in hindsight, now that I see how much progress I made in 5 or 10 years in my 40's and I think back to what I could have been doing in my 20's if I knew better(!). The kicker for me is I learned all sorts of material, and if I had just spent an extra few minutes here and there the benefits would have been much bigger.
     
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  14. SRHmusic

    SRHmusic Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Yeah, this is good. He nails it about learning scales before knowing what to do with them. (For whatever reason it seems the guitar world is overwhelmed with CAGED and scales, with not much about actual musical ideas.) Looks like he has some good videos/courses... subscribed!

    Also, I would recommend Jeff McErlain's Chord Tone Soloing course on TrueFire:
    https://truefire.com/essentials-guitar-lessons/chord-tone-soloing/c1157
     
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  15. Toast

    Toast Tele-Afflicted

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    I hear you. I'm just emphasizing that I take bits and pieces here and there. I don't spend huge amounts of time poring over theory books. I take small bites on a regular basis. I watch a video one day on harmonizing a major scale. I get confused. I close my browser. I practice a song or something else I'm working on. The next day I watch another 10 minute video on harmonizing the major scale. I just go slow and add bits and pieces over long stretches of time. I'm lazy about it, but it adds up to understanding eventually. The trick for me is to always return to what I don't understand and find multiple explanations for things I find confusing.
     
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  16. envirodat

    envirodat Tele-Meister

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    Loved the Stitch video. For someone like me who had lessons in his teens and now is in his 50's I have so much to learn and I need ways to learn it. Toast, like you I get confused and can digest it in small bites. Looking at this in my 50's, I am more disciplined on practice and learning but the later part feels slower. One big difference for me is I simply want to have fun and learn. Wish I had that when I was younger.
     
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  17. Toast

    Toast Tele-Afflicted

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    I don't think I would have appreciated learning guitar as much in my youth as I do now. I'm actually grateful to have found something in my middle age that keeps me engaged in learning. Anyway, I like a lot of Stitch's videos. He has some great lessons. I don't always share his musical taste, but I rarely do with other musicians. My only criticism of Stitch is that some of his early videos lack good diagrams. He can also mix up pattern shape names with key names on occasion. I'd love it if he went back and redid some of his old lessons, but beggars can't be choosers. Anyway, his last 2 hour masterclass video is really good, but I'm still working on some prerequisites before I dive into practicing the things in that video.

    The most useful video for me, and the one that has applied to everything I've been doing, is the one below. It's an excellent starting point for learning the guitar neck, in my opinion. Have fun.

     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2021
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  18. stinkey

    stinkey Tele-Afflicted

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    Also a very good teacher on line.
     
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  19. envirodat

    envirodat Tele-Meister

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    Thanks Toast that is something I need to master. Thanks stinkey, I think it will take time to follow and understand. I have so much to learn and that is great for me. Glad to know I won't get bored.

    To date most of my 'advancement' has been aping what I see and not really understanding the complexity below and the reason why things are the way they are.
     
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  20. radiocaster

    radiocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    This guy's really awesome, he does a bunch of Roy Harper covers and teaches you how to play them.


    The alternate tuning is a bit too intense for me, I think I'd rather learn this one instead.
     
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