This old house, check out what I found.

getbent

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used to rehab houses in grad school on the side. it was in tidewater virginia so lots of super super old houses. Of our guys, I had the this old house bug the most and I'd demo all the additions carefully and get a full picture of what was what.... it was crazy how often things were super good down below and how we could go back to original IF I was willing to scrape and sand and heat gun etc.. We reused trim and just about every floor, when we couldn't we had a container that we'd keep any 'good' stuff we demoed and we'd weave it in other places...

I had a place in kentucky that i rented, then the lady who owned it paid me to rehab it, I lived in 6 different places in her apts during those two years! most had 6 layers of carpet in them... all crappy carpet. the place had a big rodent problem (initially) I'd lay on my couch and throw baseballs at them while grading papers.

good luck with your place... listen to the little voice who whispers 'do it right' and ignore the 'ah eff it' voice. never make big decisions when you are tired and it is late. just pack up and get at it tomorrow.
 

Milspec

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So how do you tell if they’re asbestos or not?

The normal method is by the flooring pattern. There weren't that many makers of the stuff and the pattern and size of square in the pattern often tells you. The other is still pull up a section and put it under a microscope to check for fibers.

What has been noted by others is also true, after all these years, that adhesive is likely into the wood and would require sanding to restore the wood flooring which would take hiring a hazmat company to do safely unless you have such equipment.

If the floor is sound and flat, just install a hardwood floor over it while you restore the original flooring elsewhere in the house. It will not match perfectly, but you can get close. It might cause a raised floor in relation to the other areas which requires a transition to make work, but it is done often.
 

Muddyshoes

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I own a few rental properties one of them is a duplex built in 1951 and the quality of construction and materials used are so much better. My wife at some point wants to down size and sell the house and renovate one of the sides back to it's original condition and in we go.....I don't know if up for that one though.
 

Milspec

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I own a few rental properties one of them is a duplex built in 1951 and the quality of construction and materials used are so much better. My wife at some point wants to down size and sell the house and renovate one of the sides back to it's original condition and in we go.....I don't know if up for that one though.

I recall out running through a new upscale neighborhood and seeing several of the large homes being constructed. I stopped once and spoke to the builder who told me that new homes today have a 30 year life expectency. Everything is built for show and not a very high quality. Homes used to be built to stand for generations and reaching 100 years was common.

I live in a 2.5 story four square house built by the railroad in 1860. The structure is over-built to the point that Tim Allen couldn't do better. Hell, the floor joists are redwood timbers! Too bad it still needs the bathroom and kitchen updated as both were last done in 1979.
 

archetype

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Our little(ish) 1929 Craftsman had a hard pine floor under the ratty old carpets and other flooring attempts. It was pine cut from the very old/big early generation pines...turned out pretty and as hard as any oak floor we've ever had. The upper story floors were oak. The Mrs oversaw the reno's of that one as I was occupied elsewhere. ((also a lot of junk that needed abatement--flooring and insulation)).

That's fascinating, because it's the opposite of the norm in my experience with 1900-1930 A&C houses. In that era, oak was typically used on the first floor. It had some pronounced grain, house guests would see that, oak was 'trendy' in the house and furniture designs of the period, and it was durable. Pine or fir was typically used on the second floor. It often had a plainer grain, only the family saw it, and it was less durable.

Got a picture of the house? I dig 'em.
 

Twofingerlou

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The normal method is by the flooring pattern. There weren't that many makers of the stuff and the pattern and size of square in the pattern often tells you. The other is still pull up a section and put it under a microscope to check for fibers.

What has been noted by others is also true, after all these years, that adhesive is likely into the wood and would require sanding to restore the wood flooring which would take hiring a hazmat company to do safely unless you have such equipment.

If the floor is sound and flat, just install a hardwood floor over it while you restore the original flooring elsewhere in the house. It will not match perfectly, but you can get close. It might cause a raised floor in relation to the other areas which requires a transition to make work, but it is done often.


Good to know, I’ll probably just get the rest of the floor down to this layer and say screw it.
 

stormsedge

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Got a picture of the house?

263 15th st nw.PNG
 

littlebadboy

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we had a reno we did on a house that said on the title it was built 1956. While doing the remodel we found newspapers stuck in the crawl spaces for insulation that dated 1901 with news about the Philippines War.
That location also had some old pine or fir flooring that was beautiful other than the big hole in the center for the floor furnace.
Would you still have that paper by chance?
 

mr natural

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A buddy of mine bought an apartment building and asked me if I would come over and help him rip up old crappy carpet. The whole building had 3 layers of carpet over original gorgeous 1870s wide board wood floors. It took days. The wood was riddled with staples and nail holes. He covered them with cheap laminate. What a shame.
 

Harry Styron

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Well if that’s the case that sucks, there was carpet through the rest of the house. The kitchen is the only room with this many layers. Guess I might just have to do a alternate option for the kitchen.
You might find a place under a cabinet or a refrigerator where you can lift up some the the linoleum and find out what kind of adhesive is holding it down. Sentinel makes a product for removing it that costs about $25 per gallon. If its the black adhesive, it's called "black cutback" and it is tough stuff. There are a lot of YouTube videos about how to remove it.
 

bettyseldest

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Our house was about 15 years old when we bought it. For the first five years it had been a show house, and had been redecorated by the developer every few months. When I stripped the wallpaper in the living room I found four layers of wallpaper. A dado rail had then been fitted on top of the wallpaper. Then six more layers of wallpaper, each layer having one design below the rail and another above it. Some layers had also been painted. Using a steam stripper, it took me over 40 hours to strip a 22x12 room. I covered the walls in lining paper, then emulsioned. That was 21 years ago. It might be time to redecorate soon. Maybe not.
 

JL_LI

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I live in a house that’s more than 200 years old. We just had an attic to basement renovation. It was fun to look through the layers of paint to see what colors were used. The kitchen was done 12 years ago and the number of layers of flooring was astounding. We have tavaterra over the original hardwood now but surprise of surprises, the kitchen, downstairs bath, and dressing room on the second floor were added onto the original house. The town has no floor plans but lists the house as being the size of the original structure but it still has a valid certificate of occupancy. We even got a tax reduction based on the original house.
 




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