This is What a Serious Lionfish Round-up Looks Like

Telekarster

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Whoa!!!! Thanks for posting this man! I was wondering how ya'll do this! Reminds me of frog gigging when I was a kid ;) Were those lobsters you caught? What's the big fish you got there? Good job man! Wow...
 

StoneH

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Whoa!!!! Thanks for posting this man! I was wondering how ya'll do this! Reminds me of frog gigging when I was a kid ;) Were those lobsters you caught? What's the big fish you got there? Good job man! Wow...

This is a friend's video. The lobsters he caught are called rock lobsters, or locally, "slippers". The fish is a "scamp" grouper. That's not a big fish . . . this is a big fish (Gag Grouper).

DSCN3516.JPG
 

Telekarster

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This is a friend's video. The lobsters he caught are called rock lobsters, or locally, "slippers". The fish is a "scamp" grouper. That's not a big fish . . . this is a big fish (Gag Grouper).

View attachment 984947

Wow. Well, kudos for ya'll trying to take care of that problem. Man... what an undertaking. I suppose it's a good thing they just sort of sit there and let you cull em. Is there a way to bag em? Seems to me like you could put a bag over those round things and turn some sort of suction device on and suck em into the bag or something?
 

StoneH

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Wow. Well, kudos for ya'll trying to take care of that problem. Man... what an undertaking. I suppose it's a good thing they just sort of sit there and let you cull em. Is there a way to bag em? Seems to me like you could put a bag over those round things and turn some sort of suction device on and suck em into the bag or something?

I've seen big suction-sifters used to remove sand from underwater archeological sites (or treasure hunt digs), but the manpower and expense would be way beyond practical for lionfish removal. I think someone will come up with a way to modify a lobster trap that can be dropped and picked up a day later full of lionfish, but the problem is . . . if your trap picks up a fish that's out-of-season and you get caught, it's a fine (for each fish).
 

marshman

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I am saddened by this to some degree...I had a Lionfish in my home tank for about 12 years, until he finally passed away after trying to eat one of his tankmates (which he had never done before). Mine was pretty docile, I had hand fed him scallops & shrimp for most of it's life. I get why it's being done, just makes me sad.

I recall a TV series about invasive pests and there was an entire episode dedicated to the lions in the gulf/Caribbean and the steps they're trying to take to eradicate them. A genetics expert had requested specimens from all over the region, and determined that they were all descendent from 6 fish, most likely set loose on southern Florida. One guy was catching them like the chaps in the video and then trying to teach the reef sharks to eat them.
 

stxrus

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If we tried to use a Zoo Keeper here you might lose a body part or two from a misdirected shark bite
 

marshman

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They can be eaten, but given the poison glands along the spine, I presume extra care must be taken in preparation. They also don’t get that big, though I’ve seen some pretty small filets over the years.

The TV episode I mentioned earlier said that several Caribbean island restaurants have competitions for ”best Lionfish recipe”.
 

StoneH

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They can be eaten, but given the poison glands along the spine, I presume extra care must be taken in preparation. They also don’t get that big, though I’ve seen some pretty small filets over the years.

The TV episode I mentioned earlier said that several Caribbean island restaurants have competitions for ”best Lionfish recipe”.

The dorsal spines are super sharp . . . the pelvic and anal spines are thicker and not too worrisome. Once you cut off the spines, they are filleted and cooked like any other fish.
 

marshman

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Leo (the one that lived with me all those years) had a fin spread larger than a basketball at the end of his days, gorgeous to watch.
 




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