Thinline Jazzmaster #3

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Deed_Poll, Jul 16, 2020.

  1. Deed_Poll

    Deed_Poll Tele-Meister

    Posts:
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    Feb 8, 2013
    Location:
    Brighton, UK
    I'm back again making a hollow Jazzmaster with both contours, this time another traditional 'vintage correct' JM to fit Fender USA spec parts.

    The main differences from vintage (besides the f-hole and what's going on inside) are

    1) I add a 'dog bone' to the back of the vibrato route to save having to chisel the back square. Some people leave the tool radius in an otherwise square route, and this can cause knocking under vibrato use. Doing the route this way means knocking won't be an issue, and the extra will be covered by the vibrato plate.

    2) because of the way I achieve the arm and belly contours by making the body as a half-and-half pancake, the contours are about 30-40% shallower than is usual for a JM (though originals and the reissues' contour shapes and depths do vary).

    The visual effect is still maintained - the contours will catch reflections in a pleasing way, and the feature registers as "there" when looking at the body, which is a gripe I always have with flat top JMs.

    The ergonomic benefits are also still there. I always think, beyond a certain depth of contour it's arguable whether comfort is improved, or whether the guitar slides down your lap too easily or wants to sit at too much of an angle on a strap anyway!

    3) I have refined the toolpath to remove a little more material than the first one I made, mostly by creating a new cavity under the vibrato route, and by thinning the sides around the main control cavity to 1/2" constant thickness, instead of following the profile of the cavity in the treble horn area.

    This one is even more unique because it will have a contrasting top / back. The back is roasted ash, the top is ash with some mineral staining / spalting, and slightly resembles the "wildwood" Coronados of the late '60s.

    I leave little humps or tubes under the top in the pickguard screw locations to be sure of getting a good positive mechanical connection and as insurance against stripping / threading the pilot hole.

    The current plan is to send this one to the finisher in its current state for him to apply a shoreline gold finish on the *inside* prior to gluing top to back! It will have a clear pickguard, so the gold will show through the f-hole and in the pickup and control cavities. I just hope I don't ruin the effect with a pesky glue drip on the inside, since I can't wipe any excess away when it's obscured in my unholy clamping contraption! So I will be careful not to use too much glue - I expect it will be a bit of a balancing act, but that's a challenge for another day.

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    The top is 6mm thick for the most part, but thins to 3mm around the f-hole. This is the way Fender's thinlines are as well. You can see the humps I mentioned for the pickguard screws. I used a wider stepover for the underside of the top because it will not be visible, even under the transparent guard. I actually think the patterns look quite attractive!

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    The inside of the back - this will require a lot more sanding attention than usual on account of the fact it will be having a lacquered Shoreline Gold finish. I don't expect that to be a fun job, getting into all those crevices! I also think it's pretty amazing how obvious / bad the join is in this face...

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    ...whereas the join on this side (which will be the back of the guitar) is a great deal more acceptable!

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    Here are the two halves ready to be closed together like a book when the time comes to glue them. I place two reference peg holes in the diagonal corners so they marry up nicely.

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    And here I've done a test fit with the pegs in place. The routes all seem to line up where they should, but again, I have more sanding work to do on this one given that it will have a finish on the inside.

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    I will get the line around the top out by gently going around the edge with a spindle sander

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    I left a good thickness in the top for the trem screws to go into, since they are bearing the bulk of the load from string tension

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    Thanks for reading! As always, all thoughts, comments and questions more than welcome. Cheers!

    Dan
     
    SparkleFart, tewiq and zippofan like this.
  2. Crawldaddy

    Crawldaddy Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    630
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    Dec 12, 2006
    Location:
    Singapore
    Hi there! That looks amazing, I'm also currently in the process of putting together a semi-hollow Jazzmaster build with a warmoth neck, and a body sourced from Saylor guitars on ebay.

    I think your CNC routs look awesome. Is there any chance you'd be doing stuff like this for sale?
     
    Deed_Poll likes this.
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