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Thinking about getting into archery, possibly bow hunting.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by mistermullens, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. mistermullens

    mistermullens Poster Extraordinaire

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    Ideas come and go, and so do hobbies, but I've always been curious about archery. I had a brief experience with it in middle school which I thoroughly enjoyed and seemed to do pretty well in. I like the idea of long bows, but I'm not opposed to compound bows either. I just don't know where to start and need some guidance.
    I've always been pretty good at teaching myself how to do things, but would you recommend some lessons to get me started?

    Also, should I start with a long bow, and can I get one for a reasonable price?

    Any thoughts on crossbows?

    Lastly, I may get into bow hunting,but that's a bit of a ways off. Is still like to know a little about what's involved with that.

    Thanks!
     
  2. mistermullens

    mistermullens Poster Extraordinaire

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    bump
     
  3. fretbuzzard

    fretbuzzard Former Member

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    I'm interested in folks' thoughts on this too.
     
  4. Muttcaster

    Muttcaster Tele-Holic

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    I've shot bows for about 37 years.

    There is just a TON of information to answer here, but briefly... I'd start out with a compound as there are a lot of tricks to a long bow or a recurve. Get a compound and a release and shoot awhile (a year or two) and then drop "back" to a recurve if you want, after you're familiar with the language and have some skills developed.

    Find a club or good pro shop and go down there and ask questions. Try out some bows if you can. I _highly_ recommend some lessons to get you going and to prevent bad habits (some of which I developed that I'm still working on correcting!)

    Go to the ArcheryTalk forum and read, read, read. It's just like this place, only for bows.
    http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/
     
  5. domm

    domm Tele-Meister

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    ill try to find their info on the places they go. but a friend of mine in texas does bow fishing, he loves it! grew up shooting carp but they are cool fish so he now goes out during the largemouth spawn and limits out! and can actually eat the fish!
     
  6. sean79

    sean79 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'd second Muttcaster's advice on starting with a compound bow. With a release, a peep sight, and a decent rest, you could be shooting pretty consistently in short time - as long as you practice. When I first started, I made sure I shot every day - even if it was just 10 or 15 shots after work. A lot of practice, to the point that the mechanics are down without having to think about them, makes a good shot in the woods a whole lot easier.

    Talk to people. Get advice on shooting, tuning your bow, and arrows and other equipment. It's easy to get good information.

    I haven't been bowhunting in years. But I loved it when I had time to do it.
     
  7. J Lacey

    J Lacey Tele-Holic

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    Although Turkey hunting is my passion I enjoy bow hunting almost as much. Bought my first bow with money I earned as a boy working on a chicken farm. Local hardware store had a Ben Pearson compound hanging above the guns for $150.00. First time I saw the Duke boys shoot an arrow in Roscoe's tire I was hooked. Had alot of success over the years on deer and even killed a Turkey last spring with my bow. Anyway, if I can help just give me a shout and I'll do what I can. Drive up here and shoot my bow some time if you like. (an hour north of you)
    I've learned a lot over the years, trying to bow hunt. One thing most folks don't realize is that shooting a bow well and being a good bow hunter are two different things. Kinda like painting a house verses painting a picture. Either way your painting but it's two different skills so take the needed steps to get you where you wanna go in the end.
    Keep it simple is #1 for now. Enjoy the hunting DVD's and TV shows but don't buy into everything you see. Take small steps. I see your from ATL. Pick up a GON magazine off the news stand. It will have a very long list next spring of all the archery tourneys in north GA. Take a buddy and shoot 4 or 5 of those. Great way to spend a saturday. They'll have a class you can shoot until you place high enough that they make you move up. We shot a lot of those years ago. They help a lot. Non hunters as well as hard core hunters shoot those for practice.
    Establish your anchor point and stick with it! That's very important. New naked bows are running $750 to $950 these days which is more than a good rifle. Then add $120/150 in shafts. $140 for a rest. A $80 release. $ $180 for a sight, and it gets outta hand pretty fast. Broadheads are $10-15 each. Decide what you want and buy second handed. I currently shoot a lightly used Mathews Switchback decked out that I have $427.00 in. BUy what was the "it" bow 3 years ago and save some $$$.........Best of luck man.

    Jeff
     
  8. telestratosonic

    telestratosonic Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I have a couple of recurves. I used to have a 50' range for target practice set up in the back yard. Lots of fun for the family but my first shot was always a throwaway so I never got serious about hunting with the recurve. The compound advice above is solid and I'd go with that instead of the longbow or recurve.
     
  9. tonedreamer

    tonedreamer Tele-Holic

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    Today's compound bows are easy to shoot, easy to hold back for long periods of time, and very forgiving. I don't know what your seasons are like where you live, but here in Oregon bow hunters get extra long seasons, early and late. The late season is right in the middle of the rut, which is exciting. Bow hunting is a win- win in my opinion.
     
  10. WisconsinStrings

    WisconsinStrings Tele-Afflicted

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    It can be a pretty expensive hobby. The bows aren't cheap, and the accessories (sights, rests, arrows, quivers, etc) are even worse. Every year a new and faster bow comes out. Lots of guys have to have the latest and greatest.

    That said, it is fun!

    Being a Wisconsin boy, I'll have to recommend a Mathews Bow. A little more than some, but they are the innovators.

    Also... guitar tie-in... the owner and founder of Mathews bow is Matt McPherson. Also owner/founder/creator of McPherson guitars. The guy is a mechanical genius.

    Good luck with your hobby!
     
  11. adjason

    adjason Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    As others have said try to visit a couple of archery pro shops and they will give you tons of advice. If your looking for a hobby and practice shooting a recurve bow is a good choice. If you are looking to shoot well (hit a pie plate pretty much all the time up to 30 yards) after a few days then get a compound bow with a site and a peep site. I would not get a release.
     
  12. Hackenbacker

    Hackenbacker TDPRI Member

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    I joined a club about a year ago, and shoot a couple of times a week, 2 hours a time. I used the club equipment, a recurve, for a few months before buying online from Lancaster Archery. You have to shoot a while to figure out what weight limbs to get. An entry level recurve Hoyt riser is about $250 and you can get limbs for $100. Considering what you get out of it I think the price is right. I'd say join a local club and use their equipment--and coaching to get started. A few people have the compounds and long bows there as well. Recurve is probably the cheapest way to find out if it's for you. Archerytalk is like the tele site for used equipment. I shoot left so I had trouble finding used. I find it relaxing, like riding a sport bike, or guitar--everything else leaves your thoughts. Lastly, it took a good 5 to 6 months for me to appreciate how much I liked it.
     
  13. Muttcaster

    Muttcaster Tele-Holic

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    They do, but you don't have to buy into that. I've never bought a new bow. Right now, I have an '07 Hoyt Vectrix, '07 Bowtech Allegiance, '10 Hoyt Maxxis 35. I've run 'em all thru a chronograph and there's not 5 fps difference between them. And actually, the Allegiance is the easiest of the bunch to shoot with a generous valley, solid back wall, and light weight. I regret selling my '03 Hoyt Ultratec, esp now that I'm using a longer axle-to-axle for target shooting.

    I wouldn't hesitate to buy a top brand-name- Hoyt, Mathews, Bowtech, Diamond, etc- from '05 on up if it had good strings and was in good condition. I paid $300 for the Allegiance just a few months ago, and less than $500 for the Hoyts (I've owned the Vectrix for 3 years).

    Finally, I just got a Diamond Razor Edge for my wife. For < $300 bare bow, it's a fantastic starter bow IMHO. Incredibly adjustable and shoots great. I've shot it and it if were my only bow, I'd be just fine. It's like the Squier Vintage Modified of bows.

    I find archery to be very relaxing, too. And once you've got the gear, it's not that expensive. Archery and guitar are the two things I've kept going from Junior High, thru college, jobs, thru my poorest times thru times of relative affluence, and now at age 50, still doing both of 'em.

    WIStrings- I did not know that about Matt! I've played the McPherson but not shot or owned a Mathews (yet!!!). That's cool.
     
  14. MonkeyKing

    MonkeyKing Tele-Meister

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    If you are making your own guitars, you can make your own bows.
    It`s a golden age - the same way WE`RE sharing knowledge and tips, there are bowyers doing the same. It`s pretty easy to get your own blank going, but you can buy staves too.
     
  15. scrumley

    scrumley Tele-Meister

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    3 Rivers Archery has a great selection of primitive longbows at pretty reasonable prices. If you can be accurate with them, you can shoot anything. As far as learning archery, I think they're a great place to start.
     
  16. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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  17. popthree

    popthree Poster Extraordinaire

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    i'll second the 3 rivers advice.

    personally, i don't consider the modern compound with outrageous let-off... a release, carbon arrows and sights as 'archery' .. but really.. .something else.. as there isn't much 'arch' in the trajectory of the arrow.

    my grandpa owned a small archery shop where he sold bear, pearson and root recurve bows. he also made cedar arrows with fletching jigs that he fabricated himself.

    years later, my father owned an archery shop, mostly selling comound bows and other modern gear. i worked in the shop for a number of years.

    while i like compound bows, to a degree, i have a strong preference for recurve bows and the instinctive shooting style. there is something very pure about a primitive bow and arrow...sort of akin to a telecaster straight into the amp... or maybe just an acoustic guitar.. you know?

    if you are interested in trying the primitive route, i can recommend a very inexpensive bow that 3 rivers sells. we bought one of these Samick take-downs for my bro-in-law last year and i am pretty impressed with its quality, especially for the $$.. sort of the squier affinity of recurve bows...

    http://www.3riversarchery.com/Samick+Sage+62+Takedown+Recurve+Bow_i2490X_baseitem.html
     
  18. popthree

    popthree Poster Extraordinaire

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    i should also add.. that you don't want to start off with a high poundage recurve.. best to go with a 45# max.. you want to be able to shoot a lot of arrows without getting tired, and without hurting your fingers... and 45# is good for just about anything anyways...

    also.. you'd want one of these
    http://www.3riversarchery.com/Flex+Pro+Bow+Stringer_i6020X_baseitem.html

    and if you don't know any archer's locally, this would be a wise investment
    http://www.3riversarchery.com/product.asp?i=BOWSETUP
    i setup the bow for my bro-in-law... the best thing to do is put a shooting shelf on it.. 3 rivers can do that for you.. but you have to buy the components... something like this
    http://www.3riversarchery.com/Super+Pad_i3555X_baseitem.html
    you would probably be wise to just call them and talk to somebody.. whomever is going to setup the bow will have some recommendations for what they like to use.

    you'd also need arrows :)
    i really don't know a lot about the modern carbon arrows.. i'm from the cedar and aluminum era.. carbon's were becoming popular when i was getting out of the archery business. it looks like 3 rivers has a very limited selection of aluminum, but lots of carbons.. they also sell cedar arrows. if you did decide to give them a call, they could probably give you some good advice on what to buy. if not, PM me and i'll make a recommendation for sizing cedars.
     
  19. StuH

    StuH Friend of Leo's

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    Only thing I know about this is that the generic tipped arrows will not pierce Sasquatch fur, so you need the Johnie Rambo explosive tipped heads on a Bigfoot expedition.
     
  20. AJBaker

    AJBaker Friend of Leo's

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    Also look up Grozer archery. A guy in Hungary who makes traditional Asian style bows for reasonable prices. Also, in England there are guys making English longbows.
     
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