There's something I always wanted to know about the Beatles at Ed Sullivan...

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Blazer, Jun 7, 2014.

  1. sad99

    sad99 Tele-Afflicted

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    I was eight in early 1964 and for a couple months my friends and I had a little transistor radio with us pretty much at all times just waiting for a Beatles song to play. When I Wanna Hold Your Hand came on, everything immediately stopped and we listened transfixed.

    But what made the Sullivan appearance so important for us was the fact that we'd never SEEN them, other than a few pictures in magazines. I think that may be what's hard for younger people to grasp.
     
  2. Westerly Sunn

    Westerly Sunn Poster Extraordinaire

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    I was 6 years old. I couldn't have cared less whether they had been from England, Mars, or the next tobacco patch down the road, or if there was a thousand corporate deals behind them or if they played for nabs and bottle drinks...

    When I heard that sound...! I was jumping up and down, playing the tennis racket from the closet and singin' my fool head off!

    They were that galvanizing...
     
  3. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I just remember seeing all these girls screaming every time there was any footage of the Beatles shown on the B&W TV....the band was in B&W clothes/suits.....
    of course the songs all sounded great to a kid... the tour downunder in the early 60's had a similar hysteria... we were more tuned in to what was coming from Britain in those days...

    We rushed home from school to see the Beatles cartoon series on TV and heard lots of their songs through that show.... I loved those cartoons... and the characters it represented ...

    then years later at highschool... there was the Magical Mystery Tour film being shown in town, I read about it in Go-Set.. ... I had to take my younger brother into town on the bus on saturday morning with me or mum wouldn't let me go to the SGIO theatre to see it... normally a place for stage plays , not a cinema...

    there were all these freaky older people/hippies there... there was a band on before the movie.. Micheal Turner In Session.... my bro and I must have been the only kids there...

    then I saw the Beatles.. in COLOUR.. doing crazy mad stuff with the soundtrack of songs playing through out....that was so amazing.... I probably got more into the beatles as a teen with the later LP's....

    the earlier 60's phase went over my head really....;)
     
  4. Maxwell Street

    Maxwell Street Friend of Leo's

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    It was hysteria, and the building excitement was generated by the disk jockeys and repeated air play...

    "Upon Vee-Jay's February 1963 release of "Please Please Me," Dick Biondi -- a DJ at top 40 WLS Chicago and a friend of Abner's -- became the first DJ to play a Beatles record in the United States. Due primarily to airplay on Biondi's show, the song (mistakenly credited to "The Beattles" on the 45 label and in trade ads) made it to No. 35 at WLS in March, although it didn't chart nationally"

    There was a sound there that was unique, "She Loves You"..." I Want to Hold Your Hand" was huge, ( even the German versions got play in the US ) and then Ed Sullivan gave you the means to see what you had been hearing...

    "In late 1963, Sullivan and his entourage happened also to be passing through Heathrow and witnessed how The Beatles' fans greeted the group on their return from Stockholm, where they had performed a television show as warmup band to local star Lill Babs. Sullivan was intrigued, telling his entourage it was the same thing as Elvis all over again. He initially offered Beatles manager Brian Epstein top dollar for a single show but the Beatles manager had a better idea—he wanted exposure for his clients: the Beatles would instead appear three times on the show, at bottom dollar, but receive top billing and two spots (opening and closing) on each show.[34]

    The Beatles appeared on three consecutive Sundays in February 1964 to great anticipation and fanfare as "I Want to Hold Your Hand" had swiftly risen to No. 1 in the charts. Their first appearance on February 9 is considered a milestone in American pop culture and the beginning of the British Invasion in music"

    The WLS Silver Dollar Survey was a daily countdown of the hits until #1 was played around 6pm. We would pick up the survey sheet weekly at the local record store, here's a copy from '63 with The Beatles "Please Please Me" at #35, gives you an idea of what was on the charts at the time...a few lasting hits, otherwise fairly bleak...ripe for the invasion...

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2014
  5. Telemarkman

    Telemarkman Doctor of Teleocity Platinum Supporter

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    While I'm not into American football, I second this!
     
  6. bloomz

    bloomz Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

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    Eric Johnson is to me a perfect example of that statement.


    One of the most accomplished guitarists alive - without a good catalogue of his own music.


    I Wanna Hold Your Hand changed my life on its first hearing on my car radio.


    I'll never forget it and can still see my hand reaching for the volume knob. That was 50 years ago.


    Music never "rang my bell" before that moment and I bought my first album that night. And - I still have that album.
     
  7. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    I hope I have this story right. It came from Geoff Emerick's book, I'm sure. McCartney wanted more bass on the records, but the 45s were very limited in what they could handle without bouncing the needle out of the grooves. Somehow, they found a US mastering engineer who could do that. So, they flew him over so that he could get more bass on the 45s.

    Here's a sweet and touching Beatlemania story. My wife's parents live in an assisted living place, where activities take place throughout the day. One guy that lives there used to work in radio. Somehow, he wound up with a group of other radio people on a chartered plane with the Beatles on an early US tour. They had an agreement that they would not ask the Beatles to autograph anything. This guy's boss was a real hard guy. But his daughter wanted a letter from Paul more than anything in the world. The radio guy explained the situation to Paul, emphasizing that it would make his job a lot more pleasant if he could do the boss a favor like this. Well, instead of writing a letter, Paul made a cassette tape in which he played up being in love with this girl, say, Susie Connor. The guy's boss said that for the next two weeks, whenever he passed his daughter's room in the house, he could hear Paul saying, "Yes, Susie Connor. I now have to confess how madly and deeply I am in love with you. Oh, how I yearn for the day when I can finally meet Susie Connor, the true love of my life..." The radio guy's career went a lot smoother after that.
     
  8. JDC

    JDC Tele-Holic

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    Sorry to go off on a tangent, here. But, this was interesting, to me, at least.

    Telemarkman

    Re: The Four Seasons: “ And the fourth (keyboard player/composer Bob Gaudio) had been playing in*The Royal Teens*since 1956”

    As long as I've been in this business, I'm amazed at the new things I learn and how seemingly unrelated happenings seem to inter-relate.

    I didn't know Bob Gaudio played in the Royal Teens.

    I DID know that one member of the Royal Teens, when they cut "Short Shorts" in 1958. was a kid named Billy Crandall on sax. His parents wouldn't let him tour so he was replaced.

    He later changed his stage name to Buddy Randell and here's where things come full circle

    The band he was then leading had a top 20 hit with a song that many thought was actually the Beatles.

    Larry re: http://pnwbands.com/

    It's like "old home week" every time I go there. I was in the middle of all that in the mid to late 60s. It's pretty amazing at some of the folks who came out of the PNW (and just as amazing is how many are still active).

     
  9. macdog

    macdog Tele-Holic

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    One of the telling quotes in the article is about Sullivan initially seeing them as a 'novelty' act. The Beatles had to overcome widespread stupidity about themselves and their music.
     
  10. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'm watching a Beatles in Australia doco on TV atm....

    they had been signed on a contract for 1000 pounds a week to do the tour.....

    at a time just after they had hit the states and were being offered $50,000 a show...

    what a coup...:)
     
  11. rokdog49

    rokdog49 Friend of Leo's

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    One final from me.
    My grandson is thirteen. He loves to hear "She Loves You", "I Want to Hold Your Hand" and tons of the others. Maybe his most favorite Beatle's songs of many is "Here Comes the Sun." He's freakin' thirteen and that was 50 years ago! He actually stops whatever he's doing when he hears it and says, "I love this song." That tells you all you need to know about the Beatles.
     
  12. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I know, but they were too close for me to take them off the list. :D

    Exactly. The Beatles transformed that old 12-bar rock and roll of 1956. By 1963, though, too many acts were still just doing the same thing. Rock and Roll had grown stale and had lost its ability to stir the passions of young people and freak out the older folks. "It's My Party" was not going to piss off the parents of teenagers playing it in the basement.

    I'm not overthinking it. I'm just focusing on the state of rock and roll at that time. Someone else brought in every other genre of music and tried to make some point about The Beatles, Burt Bacharach, Peter Paul and Mary, and Patsy Cline.
     
  13. adeiderich

    adeiderich Tele-Afflicted

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    It was the music.

    Billboard Top 100 prior to their appearance on Ed Sullivan.


    Sept '63 - Sugar Shack - Jerry Gilmer and the Fireballs
    Oct -63 - Deep Purple - Nino Temple and April Stevens
    Nov '63 - I'm Leaving it up to you - Dale and Grace
    Dec '63 - Dominique - The Singing Nun
    Jan '64 - There, I've Said it Again - Bobby Vinton
    Feb '64 - I Want to Hold Your Hand - Beatles

    The rest is history.
     
  14. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    Admin Post
    Many years ago there was an Emperor so exceedingly fond of new clothes that he spent all his money on being well dressed. He cared nothing about reviewing his soldiers, going to the theatre, or going for a ride in his carriage, except to show off his new clothes. He had a coat for every hour of the day, and instead of saying, as one might, about any other ruler, "The King's in council," here they always said. "The Emperor's in his dressing room."...

    or maybe it is the one about forests and trees

    If you know what I mean.

    :)
     
  15. reverbbb

    reverbbb Friend of Leo's

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    I recently read that George really disliked all the fame. When he was younger, he aspired for fame. But after only 3~4 MONTHS after Ed Sullivan's show, he was done with wanting any fame. Unfortunately, the genie was out of the bottle. He never got true peace after that. He was nearly murdered by a crazy man with a knife in his own home in the UK. That same week, a lady had broken into his home in Maui and lived there for 7 days before she was arrested. George so desired solitude, but could never get it.

    I also saw a John & Yoko home movie where some guy had somehow found his way from the USA to John's backyard. The groundskeeper alerted John & Yoko and they met him at the back door. John asked him why he was there. The man replied, I just wanted to see You. John replied, "I'm just a man, just like you - nothing special" (paraphrased). Then John invited him in to eat breakfast because he had not eaten much in two weeks.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2014
  16. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    These are the things I remember. I think the link that Skully posted is a wonderfully written recap of each and every wheel in the machine that brought us the Beatles but it can't explain the gut level and nearly unanimous love for the music produced by these guys. And the fact that the boys making the music were "different" looking and interesting came as a further revelation rather than the "reason" for their mass appeal.
     
  17. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    The detailed recap that Skully cited is good reading.

    I like how it at least offers some alternate explanations/versions of how things happened.

    I'm still trying to figure out how that attorney fired himself from one client then turned right around and advocated against that very client - I guess the Bar Association in Illinois was pretty lax back then.

    But I'm really not 100% sure reading this story will actually convince a young person or someone from another culture, that it happened this way. In some respects, the pattern of events is simply too bizarre to be digested by the skeptical mind. Being there and watching things unfold is the best persuasion - and if you weren't there you may never get it.

    I do remember, even though we didn't have TV, how kids I knew saw Cronkite as their favorite "old" guy, and didn't have anything nice to say about the stale fossils at NBC. ;)
     
  18. Veebus52

    Veebus52 Tele-Meister

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    It was called RADIO. We listened to the radio and to the top 40 countdown each week. I was 11 going on 12 and would spend my weekly allowance buying the latest top 40 hit, which included the Beatles and every other popular British group. I went to sleep every night listening to the radio. I had a crystal radio set that didn't need batteries and a earplug so I didn't keep my brother awake. Those were some great times! I only wish I would have kept taking guitar lessons back then.
     
  19. Telemarkman

    Telemarkman Doctor of Teleocity Platinum Supporter

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    Obviously.

    But I guess we didn't listen too much to the old folks ourselves when we were young ...
     
  20. hekawi

    hekawi Poster Extraordinaire

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    here's the scene:
     
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