There were some great horror writers in the 70s and 80s, and Steppen King was one of them

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by blowtorch, Oct 8, 2019.

  1. HotRodSteve

    HotRodSteve Friend of Leo's

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  2. VWAmTele

    VWAmTele Friend of Leo's

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    I thought the mini-series was okay - not great - very tough to display that particular book in film form. Now, 'The Shining' - I was very disappointed by the movie - it strayed too far from the book. The made-for-tv version with Rebecca De Mornay (at the height of her powers ;) ) was much better.
     
  3. jman72

    jman72 Tele-Afflicted

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    No way. He writes all his own stuff.
     
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  4. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I have no way to defend the mini-series of the stand, I really enjoyed it. it stuck close to the novel.

    if you want to see some blood meridian on film, you can go on utube and watch a scene that jess franco made. it's the scene of the ex-priest telling the story of how the judge made gunpowder. it's not great.

    i have so very little confidence that hollywood could make a decent film of blood meridian. there is nothing politically acceptable about it. which is one of the reasons i love it so much - i've read blood meridian at least 15 times, maybe closer to 20. it's been about 10 years since i read it last - and just typing about it here, scenes are coming to my memory: unpacking the walker colts, the fortune-tellers tent blown away in the wind, the dancing bear, slaughtered, the kid and the hermit - who tells the kid the 4 things that can destroy the earth, the ignorant man who scolds glanton for "making a pet of a horse", the preacher near the beginning who tells us Exactly who the judge really is, glanton's head split open, thrown on a pyre along with his dog...

    what a magnificent book.

    edit to add: jess franco made a movie of child of God. it is actually pretty good. but he can't handle BM.
     
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  5. dlew919

    dlew919 Poster Extraordinaire

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    James Pattison has credited Co writers, who I think do the grunt work and he helps develop plot etc.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
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  6. Milspec

    Milspec Friend of Leo's

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    I used to date a gal who was a bank teller in King's home town. She used to tell me about all the checks she processed from area grad students from King....really big checks.
     
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  7. CalebAaron666

    CalebAaron666 Tele-Meister

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    I’m a rabid SK fan, and it’s not just cuz I’m a Mainer!

    There are still a handful of his books I haven’t read yet, but I’ve read far more than I haven’t.

    The Stand is his masterpiece. It’s a masterpiece period. Not just his.

    IT was also a masterstroke.(no movie could ever ever ever do it justice).

    Personally, I think the best King stories made into films are De Palma’s Carrie, Pet Sematary (NOT THE NEW ONE!), Tobe Hooper’s Salem’s Lot, Cronenberg’s The Dead Zone, and The Graveyard Shift.

    Notice Kubrick’s The Shining isn’t on my list? Not a fan.

    Creepshow and Storm or the Century as awesome as they are, don’t count because they were written directly for the screen, so they are not adaptions.
     
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  8. 57fenderstrat

    57fenderstrat Tele-Meister

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    IT is probably my favorite book ever! I have The Stand and Pet Sematary around the house too but for some reason haven’t started them yet , this thread is gunna give me the drive though
     
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  9. CalebAaron666

    CalebAaron666 Tele-Meister

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    Oh man, you are in for it!
    The Stand is HUGE!
    It’s been called an American Lord of the rings. It’s an epic story. You’ll not regret it.
    I’ve read it 3 times, and listened to it as an audiobook once.
    Pet Sematary just might be his darkest book, and that says a lot. It’s a quick read compared to The Stand.
     
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  10. edvard

    edvard Tele-Afflicted

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    I liked Stephen's short stories better than any of his novels. It always seemed to me like he was grasping at straws to tie up loose ends toward the end of the book, and so the ending always landed kinda awkward. With the short stories, the ending was often left to your imagination, and that worked out better.

    The middles of his novels though... :eek:
     
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  11. Uncle Bob

    Uncle Bob Tele-Meister

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    "Full Dark, No Stars" and "Everything's Eventual" are my favorite short story collections.

    His unexpected out of character stories are his best work IMO. Shawshank, Stand By Me, etc. I really liked this one
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13596166-joyland

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. Tommy Biggs

    Tommy Biggs Friend of Leo's

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    He was especially guilty of this in the 80s- 90s and 00s!
    I concur with your review - especially buildup and character development. I'm not really a fan - and kind of detested his writing for a long time.

    He did a better job with the Mr. Mercedes trilogy, I think his editors got the message at some point. I no longer dismiss all his work as being a 'in it for the money' or 'follow the formula' writer.
     
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  13. Rasmuth

    Rasmuth Tele-Afflicted

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    I've read most of King's work, Salems Lot was a terrific book.
     
  14. draggindakota

    draggindakota Tele-Meister

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    I'm a huge fan of SK books as well. I've read through the Dark Tower series (all 8 core books) 4 times I think? The first novel I ever remember reading was Misery when I was like, 8 years old.

    For some reason his work just seems to have to worst luck translating to the big screen though. There are some good movies but most seem to go off the rails very quickly. Don't even get me started on that catastrophe with Idris Elba & Matthew McConnauhey :rolleyes:
     
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  15. raito

    raito Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    King? Writes great short stories and awful novels.

    I don't have any good contemprary horror writers. I read Weird Tales stuff from the early 20th century.

    As for Asimov, a tale. In high school, they had a course in science fiction. The teacher didn't really know anything about it (Dragonflight? really? another tale there). Anyway, we had an assignment to do a bibliography (this is very pre-internet, you had to work) on an author. All the students got together and figured we all pick authors that the teacher didn't know. I ended up doing Moorcock. One guy insisted on doing Asimov, even though the rest of us didn't want him to because we wanted the teacher to not know the author. He said not to worry, and it ended up that he was right. All the books up to that point, his scholastic theses and research papers, and a couple hundred articles on varied subjects.

    Yes, we got the teacher. But I think she liked it.
     
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  16. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I remember attending a high school rally, in which the guidance counselor was discussing new class offerings for the next semester, he mentioned upcoming science offerings, including "science fiction". And he was being completely sincere :confused:
     
  17. raito

    raito Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I remember attending a high school rally and walking out of it with the wrestling team. In front of everyone in the school.

    BTW, our guidance counselors rocked. I got some great assistance from them.
     
  18. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    In high school a general lit class was doing a section on Poe. The teacher told the class that I was more well-read in Poe than he was. Which, I don't understand why he would do that, even though it was certainly true
     
  19. Lawdawg

    Lawdawg Tele-Holic

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    Great story, I love Asimov. It reminds me of Cordwainer Smith, a lesser known but equally brilliant sci fi author. Smith was the pen name of Paul Linebarger who was a professor of Asiatic studies, worked with military intelligence, and quite literally wrote the book on "Psychological Warfare."
     
  20. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    BTW IMO The Stand is a victim of it's own weight and wanting-to-be epic
     
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