There is no D# in the key of Cm...

Stratocaster4life

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Is it a C# or Db?
 

oldunc

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How does this go on and on? You can write music any way you like; like any language, music belongs to its users equally. If A#### makes more sense too you than Db, go for it. There are conventions that most people stick to for clarity and ease of use, but they aren't enforceable.
 

Maguchi

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It's kind of weird that D is never sharp. E is flat. OTOH, you can have both F# and Gb in your musical language. C can be sharp and D can be flat. Traditions.
D can be sharp in the keys of E major, B major, C# minor and G# minor and a couple oither keys. However in a key like C minor that has Eb as part of the scale, I can't see a situation where you would use D#.
 

Maguchi

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But C is really just H#, and Eb is H####
Aah, you know about the H! Not many people I've met in music know about it. I only know because my dad who taught me music came to the US from Europe in his 20s and was educated in their system. H is used in place of B in German and some Scandinavian countries. However a Bb is called B not H flat. Don't ask me why :(. Sorry, didn't mean to hijack the post, but it was something I had almost forgotten and hadn't talked about in years.

https://www.classicfm.com/discover-music/music-theory/music-theory-different-countries/
 

DNestler

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...nice lady sending me chord charts.

Got some gigs coming up, adding lead guitar and vocals to a former duo, now wanting to go out as a trio.

It shouldn't bother me, but it does. Cm is 3 flats -- Eb, Ab, Bb. The scale is C D Eb F G Ab Bb. Eb is right there. D#? Nope.

I agree. I'd call it Eb because you flatten the third to make the Cm chord. Ergo: Eb rather than D#. Plus you ALREADY have D natural. Much less confusing to call it Eb.

tch...Some people. :)

Daniel
 

mrmtele

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I have a Korg rack mount tuner and it only has # (sharps) no flats. Not sure if that's just the only way they could design it or if they don't think there is such a thing as flat notes. I'm used to it so don't have any problem figuring out which sharps and flats are the same notes.
 

Rockinvet

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Ouch! I wouldn’t say a word unless they ask. I speak from years of personal experience. A sure way to get on people’s nerves is correcting them theoretically. I’ve learned to smile and thank them graciously for the road map.

Unless your teaching a class then get out the dreaded red marker!
 

Jay Jernigan

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There is a key of C# major, but it is very rarely used. If you look up the circle iof 5ths in a harmony or theory book, it will show C# as well as Db, and F# as well as Gb. https://www.classicfm.com/discover-music/music-theory/what-is-the-circle-of-fifths/

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I stand corrected.
My theoretical education, such as it was, tended to be piano- centric and rarely used equalled frowned upon; or at least disliked by the majority.
Not sure how it would have been received if I had turned in a composition in the key of Cflat, for instance.
As per a previous post, a whole step modulation from Bmajor (5sharps) to C# major (7 sharps) makes sense in spite of the unwieldy signature.
So, um, excuse me...
 

Maguchi

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I stand corrected.
My theoretical education, such as it was, tended to be piano- centric and rarely used equalled frowned upon; or at least disliked by the majority.
Not sure how it would have been received if I had turned in a composition in the key of Cflat, for instance.
As per a previous post, a whole step modulation from Bmajor (5sharps) to C# major (7 sharps) makes sense in spite of the unwieldy signature.
So, um, excuse me...
I agree, don't think I've ever seen a piece written in C#. However a modulation to C# might happen on a rare occasion. I learned on piano too and I do remember seeing some compositions in B natural and Db. They were a bear to play, at least on piano. On guitar, probably easier to play in a key with a lot of sharps or flats for some reason.
 
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Maguchi

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I've heard that the reason that some keys get used more than others is because guitar players like to play where the dots are on their necks more than in between the dots, lol. Maybe there's some truth to it.
Also some keys are more popular on guitar due to open strings or open position chords that are available on the guitar
 

Maguchi

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I hated it when people in a band start arguing over note and chord spellings. It wastes time and creates confusion.

Not everyone in the band is using the same spelling system. Sometimes SRV thinks he's in G, but it is sounding Gb or F# due to tuning. Yngwie, in his concerti, plays Am in his guitar fingerings, but the poor violinists' work is made more difficult and less sure when they have to play in Ab minor. When someone writes a concerto for detuned guitar and standard-tuned orchestra, how do you title the work? Concerto in Am or Concerto in Abm?
G# minor would be most likely used because it is 5 sharps. But Ab minor, which is 7 flats could also be used. I follow the reasoning that if the guitar was detuned, the piece would be played with the fingerings and on the frets that would be a higher key on a standard tuned guitar, however the title of the piece would be in the key that it sounds in. However there are some exceptions. There are some orchestras that play Baroque music with old Baroque style instruments which are tuned lower than today's pitches and tunings. In those cases the pieces would be titled in the keys that existed in the 1600s which sound lower by today's standards,
 
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Hpilotman

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Paralysis by Analysis.

Just Plug In and Play and have fun. Otherwise why are we doing it?

I heard a guitar player from the hills of Tennessee in the early 1970's who was a sawmill worker by day. I'm willing to bet that he did not know a lick of theory but was an outstanding player that could have given Chet Atkins a run for the money.

Learn whatever amount of theory you need to make you happy.
 




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