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The "wood myth" busted again!

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by Telenator, Aug 23, 2010.

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  1. Pepi

    Pepi Tele-Afflicted

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    [​IMG]
     
  2. Telenator

    Telenator Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    LOL!
     
  3. tgfmike

    tgfmike Telefied Gold Supporter

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    Of course wood type has nothing to do with it. Pickup height is what makes the difference.
     
  4. cowardm

    cowardm Tele-Holic

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    I have no explanation as to why a maple fretboard would sound warmer than a rosewood fretboard if the two necks were played on the same guitar. But in this case they weren't, which indicates to me that many factors could come into play. The material of the saddles, weights of the woods, pickups (no two are alike), etc. These little factors all contribute to the whole.

    That said, I still chose a rosewood fretboard for it's warmer properties and though it may make up 2% of the tone, it is none the less a part of it.
     
  5. jimd

    jimd Friend of Leo's

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    Thank god you didn't mention whether they were poly or nitro!

    Pickups, pickup height and strings (new, old, or type) all have much more to do with what sound is produced by vibrating strings moving through a magnetic field that induces a current that goes to an amp and makes a noise, than what the ends of the strings are attached to.
     
  6. whoisalhedges

    whoisalhedges Tele-Meister

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    FACT:

    Maple fretboards sound better. This is a FACT.




    Of course, they only sound appreciably better while I'm playing them; and as I much prefer playing maple fretboards to rosewood (or anything else), I play better on maple. ;)
     
  7. Pepi

    Pepi Tele-Afflicted

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    I've always heard that 'Tone' is in the fingers ;)
     
  8. bluebilly

    bluebilly Tele-Meister

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    NO! You got it all wrong. We all know that you need to spend 5k$ to have good tone. Ability = worthless. Gear = rock star.
     
  9. JD0x0

    JD0x0 Poster Extraordinaire

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  10. MikeS29

    MikeS29 Tele-Meister

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    It already has been.
     
  11. MondoGuitar

    MondoGuitar Tele-Holic

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  12. hoofer

    hoofer TDPRI Member

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    Telenator
    my Custom Shop Custom Telecaster with Rosewood fingerboard is brighter than my CS 51Nocaster. I'm probably not busting any myths but anyone who has heard these guitars agrees
     
  13. cowardm

    cowardm Tele-Holic

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    This would indeed confirm two things:
    1) The rosewood having brighter tone could be attributed to these things. If they had the same set of strings on them brand spakin' new and the pickup heights were the same, then how might have they compared then?

    2) That the OPs assertion that tonewood (particularly of a fretboard) is negligible compared to the whole is indeed warranted. Particularly when it's given that something as simple as strings can make an allegedly warmer wood sound brighter in comparison to an allegedly brighter wood.


    That said. While companies like USACG and Warmoth have a vested interest in the tone of wood, the fact that these guys do claim a distinction is enough for me to take it seriously.

    That is to say, that details matter and therefore whether and so the tonewood of your fretboard matters.
     
  14. rcole_sooner

    rcole_sooner Poster Extraordinaire

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    ... or maybe not completely ...

    I do not ask a cars salesman which car is best, as they seldom point you to the cheapest. With some knoweldge and communication, you and the salesman can arrive at a good choice.

    I, of course, do not think USACG or Warmoth are out to decieve anyone either. All things should be taken in context.
     
  15. zoobear

    zoobear TDPRI Member

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    The REAL twang depends on what Im drinking!
     
  16. Sharp5

    Sharp5 Tele-Holic

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    Everyone has different scales for what they think is bright warm etc. I built a Korina tele with a rosewood fretboard. I don't know as much as a lot of you but I think most would say this would be a darker/warmer build?

    Just an hour ago I got done playing thinking "Dang this thing is bright." Now, I tend to favor warmer sounds which is why I built this tele. I can make it sound the way I want so it is cool. I'm not super into chicken picken. Some of you who are might not think it twangs enough.

    It's all so subjective. Short of hooking it up to some kind of machine and see which partials are really being emphasized I don't think you could ever come to some kind of rule or conclusion.
     
  17. Rob52

    Rob52 Tele-Holic

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    People ask them questions and expect an answer, so they get the generaly accepted replies concerning different wood species. This reinforces the general view.
    In general maple probably is brighter sounding than rosewood, ash brighter than alder, etcetera, that's why those views become generaly accepted in the first place, but each tree is different and as has been pointed out various parts of the tree can be different too.
    Pick some decent woods, decent pickups, bridge, pots and so on and you'll probably finish up with a decent guitar, but it's particular sound will be the result of the sum of it's parts, plus what you play it through and how you play it.
    The variability inherent in what guitars are made of is all part of the fun, when you find one where everything gels together just right (for you) enjoy it, but don't expect a foolproof formula, there probably isn't one.
     
  18. e-merlin

    e-merlin Doctor of Teleocity

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    Thank God I'm not alone anymore!
     
  19. Durtdog

    Durtdog Poster Extraordinaire

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    Wow, deja vu all over again.
     
  20. tele12

    tele12 Friend of Leo's

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    Another big variable would be age/brand of strings.
     
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