1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

The Vyper & Mustang Experience

Discussion in 'Modeling Amps, Plugins and Apps' started by karnac, Nov 29, 2013.

  1. Tele-toter

    Tele-toter TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    37
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Greensboro
    LOVE my Pathfinder R. I want a desktop/practice amp..I am going Yamaha THR10C just because I had a Mustang and despised FUSE. YMMV
     
  2. Rich Lather

    Rich Lather TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    35
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    Location:
    Colorado
    The first time I tried the Mustang III I dismissed it immediately, because the presets sounded horrible. You really have to strip off all the heavy effects to hear how good the models are. Just a heads up - it is all about the customization. The versatility is what makes it so much fun and so useful. I can create unique great sounding custom patches for each of my guitars...or even individual pickups.

    I don't get some of the folks here that found the Mustang too complicated. I found it surprisingly intuitive and only consulted the manual a couple of times. Seriously it is not hard to catch on to.
     
  3. Jim Dep

    Jim Dep Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,208
    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    New York

    You know what gets me too, Rich, is that some players can go right through all the factory presets and sound like a million bucks.....not me.

    If I couldn't change the Mustang's settings (presets) to my style of playing, I wouldn't have been interested. What I love about it is that I can go to the original amp models and set it up exactly the way I like it. What other amp allows you to do that? I don't know either....:)

    Still, I wonder if the cabinet was made to look like the Excelsior, would it look a little more user friendly?
     
  4. TwangyWhammy

    TwangyWhammy Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,354
    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2014
    Location:
    South Hemi GMT+12
    Same here… I only found one stock preset useful, but what I like about the Mustang III is that it's possible to work on an amp setting until it's exactly as I want it.

    Reverb is a strong part of my playing style, but not just some random reverb effect... I has to be right. A mate of mine lent me his Vox AC15 and I liked it - but I didn't like its spring reverb. With the Mustang, I have various types of reverb (both digital, hall, and spring emulations) to pick and choose from. I have a '60s Brit amp sim paired with a Fender spring reverb. Not only that, I can go deep and tailor the parameters of any chosen reverb and colour the influence it has on the tone - fabulous!
     
  5. Allan66

    Allan66 TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    65
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2013
    Location:
    Liverpool
    I have Mustang 111 v2 I use the 65 twin preset but set it to what sounds best to me, I use a Gibson Les Paul with it, it sounds great at gigs.
     
  6. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    9,400
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Location:
    On the Bayou in da Tundra
    Get the Mustang V2 III.
    The amp is amazing, but with the III you have 100W and that gives more push
    and more headroom.
    The price difference is almost negligent.

    Some of the presets I didn't think I would get much use out of, but after about 75 presets they go right to the amp models w/o anything on them at all. So you can manipulate the presets or you can go to the amp models at the end of the 100 and make your own.
    The Fuse site was a big seller to me. You have access to Fender techs, and there are tons of patches you can download right into the amp if you would like.
    I use either this amp or a Roland Cube on my live gigs. I do all my recording with amps.
     
  7. Jim Dep

    Jim Dep Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,208
    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    New York
    Say Gary, just curious. What helps you decide which amp that you want to use on a gig? Do you play different styles depending on where you're playing?

    IOW, there were some places where we'd do an hour dinner set, playing mostly jazz standards, and then change formats for the dance crowds coming in later.

    Are you able to run the Mustang III and the Roland Cube together?
     
  8. Vindibona

    Vindibona TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    99
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2014
    Location:
    Mexico
    Late to the party... But obviously people are still reading this stuff.

    Mustangs: I've tried them all. I took lessons on a Mustang II. I thought the sound was overprocessed and I didn't like how you had to cycle thru modes to get what you wanted. The local GC was pushing them, but none of them felt right. The Mustang I just sounded cheap.

    In my search I found a used Line 6 Spider II 75/12 with the FBV pedal in mint condition. IMO it blew the Mustangs out of the water. Interestingly, I have recently come across some Spider IVs and I don't care for the sound as well as my Spider II. Could it be in my mind? Perhaps. The IV's have a lot more bells and whistles, but I'm ok with just dialing what I want and saving to one of the 4 recall channels. In the interest of full disclosure, the Line 6 does have a learning curve to dial in what you like.

    But then... I found a Roland Cube 40XL on clearance. Much as I like my Line 6, I like the Roland equally as well. The Cube has a nice clean sound, crisper than what I can dial in on my Line 6 and several nice amp models. It is straightforward and easy to use. It doesn't have the power of the Line 6. I've hear the 80XL is even nicer.

    I'm still interested in getting a tube amp, but honestly don't know how much better sound I'll get. Both these amps are nice for what they are, and IMO sound WAY better than the Mustangs. Again... Just my opinion.
     
  9. Drubbing

    Drubbing Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,617
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2012
    Location:
    Perth, West Australia
    The Mustangs sound terrible stock because they throw all the mods and FXs into the presets. The point of the Mustang is to turn off the crap and you get the base clean sound to work off. You wouldn't buy any amp complete with someone else's pedal board setup and preferred dial ins, why would the Mustang be any different?

    Modelling amp or tube, you start with a good clean sound you like, and add what you actually use and need. As for how good the sounds are, if you want a Fender amp, then you probably want a Fender modeller.
     
  10. kend

    kend Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    429
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2014
    Location:
    Vancouver
    If the Mustang sounded over - processed, I would say it was poorly dialed in. Was it set on maximum distortion?

    I have had many amps - tube and modellers- and have to say the Mustang 3 is as good as ever. ...Especially if you like that on the edge tube break-up which is my sound,- they excel.

    I recommend you give the 3 another try (no cycling through) , spend some time with it- give it a chance!
    On the other hand if you have found what you are looking for... well then that's great too!
     
  11. Acmebatmansuit

    Acmebatmansuit TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    94
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2013
    Location:
    Centennial, CO
    I've posted this on other threads before so I apologize to those who've seen this before. About a year ago I bought a used M III V1. It was ok, but I just couldn't fall in love with it. I took it back to GC and ended up going the Peavey route. I picked up a couple of Peavey Bandits. A Teal Stripe Bandit and a 2010 Transtube. The 2010 was just a little bit richer in tone and slightly more versatile but that could have also been because I put an Eminence Legend speaker in it. I took the Teal Stripe back because as we all know, wives begin to ask questions about how many amps and guitars we have, and why we need all of them. I loved the Bandits. They had their own sound and dialed in very nicely. In retrospect, I should have kept the Teal. The used Transtube died a month later and GC gave me my money back. Back to the Fender Princeton 112 I've had for 2 decades with an Eminence Texas Blues in it that at the end of the day is really better than any of the amps I'd tried. But GAS knows no bounds. I traded a bunch of old pedals for a Peavey Bandit Pro at Music Go Round, and it's fine, but not as good as the Transtube. This Christmas, I picked up a Mustang II, V2, and I really liked it, but it was a little limiting, and really only a practice amp for the bedroom. I moved up to the M III, V2, and I love it. The open back, Celestion speaker and 100 watts really make a big difference. I'm having a blast with it.
     
  12. daddyopapa

    daddyopapa Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,070
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2005
    Location:
    BC Canada
    I've owned a Cube 30 and just bought a Mustang III v2. I like the Mustang better than the Cube. The Cube has 2 good tones, BF and JC Clean. The Mustang's BF is better than the Cube's BF and I've managed to fake a pretty decent JC clean sound with the Mustang. The reverbs and delays are also miles and miles ahead of the Cube. And the Mustang also has good Tweed tones from 4 tweed amps. I've yet to visit the Marshall and Boogie tones. The Mustang also has balanced XLR outs and an FX loop. And comparing apples to apples, the Roland Cube GX is about $80 more than the Mustang III v2 new.

    As far as a previous poster saying having to use FUSE all the time is a hassle, I learned to edit on the amp without even checking the manual before I hooked up FUSE. And I am no computer tweaker by any stretch of the imagination.
    The Cube 80 is lighter, more compact, and is very rugged, though. My Cube was bullet proof. No experience with a Vypyr.

    I am happy with my Mustang and feel I made the correct choice.
     
  13. Jim Dep

    Jim Dep Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,208
    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    New York
    The Mustangs do sound over-processed out of the box. That's a common 1st impression.

    Since much of modern pop /rock music is overprocessed coming out of the studio, maybe that's the customer base that Fender is targeting, by the choices of factory presets they loaded it with.

    Don't let those fool you! :p

    Here's the difference:

    What the Mustangs allow you to do is get rid of the all processing. I'm repeating what many others are saying; you can omit all the processing and then add as much or as little as you want, and the amp has these effects and variables all self contained. If someone is able to compare the dry signal from the Mustang to the dry output of the vintage amp it is modeling, it is scary how close it sounds, with so much of the subtle nuances that the human ear can detect. The SAG and tube biasing is adjustable, so you can really get that tube amp feel in your hands.

    Recommend to anyone to really sit down and take a closer look.
     
  14. kend

    kend Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    429
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2014
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Absolutely.
    I've been exchanging gear for years - - amps in - - - amps out. I,ve had the Mustang 3 for a few months now and it's not going anywhere. I've never been this satisfied with an amp, ever.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.