The truth about olive oil for our telecaster

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by Moniyaw, May 23, 2019.

  1. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    and. . . if "you guys" would just practice/play your guitars enough, instead of looking at them and trying to figure out something else to "mod".. your would fingers supply all the oils the wood would ever require.... funny how that works...

    rk
     
  2. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    I use the “lemon” oil stuff designed for guitars but might move to mineral oils based on some of the observations here. I only really use it on new fretboards if the wood is a little dry. After that, fingers do the work.

    As for cleaning, a slightly damp (not wet) rag has always been my preference over anything else.
     
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  3. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    Well.. "Lemon Oil" IS Mineral Oil.. it just has other chemicals added to make it smell like lemon, etc., .. check the label.. Petroleum distillates is a cute misnomer for Mineral Oil... look it up..


    rk
     
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  4. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Cheers Ron... Yeah, I knew it had some in along with the other gunk. But they never tell you exactly what the other other gunk is... You would think it wouldn’t do any harm if it’s designed for guitars but then most stands and some straps can damage a nitro finish - as I’ve seen first-hand. Some manufacturers don’t seem to cater for anything but a plastic finish.

    And why you need to add stuff to make it smell nice is beyond me!
     
  5. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    the thing with "mystery" oils intended for applications other than use on a guitar IS the additives... you never know what they are, or what their reaction with the finish on a guitar may be... further complicating the conundrum is, the makers/blenders of the oils can change "recipes" at any time ...

    Considering that oiling the fingerboard does nothing in reality other than make the wood look a little more something... why in hell use anything not intended for the guitar, or something as innocuous as Mineral Oil...

    Oiling your fingerboard does nothing, it does not make the guitar sound any better.. if might make it play better since the oil residue may lubricate your fingertips making 'em slip over the now greasy strings, but other than that.... NOTHING..

    In the 50's and 60's we'd run our fingers through out slicked back and greasy hair to make our fingers glide over the rusty strings... you guys have no idea how great ya have it with strings today.. back then the good ones felt like razor blades, and, the Back Diamonds, Gawd...they were awful. The Marquis d'Sade was once asked about installing Black Diamonds on a guitar he was giving to a "lady of the evening", He said, "Oh Hell no, that's just too mean.."

    Remember a fingerboard that really, genuinely, NEEDS oiling is as rare as an honest Politician..

    Oh.. and here's a killer for you guys... WD 40 is Mineral oil. with other gunk in it.... but its fine for use on your fingerboards... because some of the other gunk is there to emulsify the mineral oil and cause the solvents to evaporate leaving only the most brief "memory" of oil ever being there.... it also has NO Silicone in it..

    WD is an acronym for Water Displacement, it was created for applications to displace accumulated moisture. 40 represents the number of blends it took to get it right..

    I have a rosewood board neck,.. I soaked it 12 years ago.. and have re-soaked it every few weeks or so, as I have thought of it... just to see how gawddawfull the stuff is as declared by less than knowledgeable contributors to the information, or more like the false information base in the forums.... to me, it's actually the perfect oil.

    I now use it to clean the "crud" that accumulates on the neck AFTER IT'S LACQUERED, (that means do NOT ever put any oil on raw lumber that you intend on lacquering) .. it cleans tape residue, accumulated machining waxes, polishing compounds, etc, .. and any remaining, after a dry rag wipe down, evaporates... then the application of a good wax (except on a wood fingerboard) removes any remaining... try it.. Oh, if you do.. ya spray it lightly on a rag, then wipe the whatever.. do not apply oils or anything directly to the fingerboard...

    rk
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2019
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  6. fasteddie42

    fasteddie42 Tele-Holic

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    Watch out folks, Mr. Kirn is firing on all cylinders this morning!


    :lol:
     
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  7. Bill

    Bill Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Ok, I followed you guys’ advice and boiled my fingerboard.
     
  8. El Marin

    El Marin Tele-Afflicted

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    PERIOD
     
  9. DuckDodgers

    DuckDodgers Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    If you do use olive oil, use the cheapest grade, which has the fewest additional compounds in it and is the least likely to go rancid. But in general, while a light oil is good for cleaning a fingerboard, it won’t penetrate, won’t set up, and the tiny amount remaining after you wipe it down will quickly be transferred to your fingers and clothes ;-)
     
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  10. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    if you do.. stop...

    OK look at it this way.. Olive Oil is about 10 bux for a little bottle... and you can use it with a good balsamic vinegar to make a nice salad dressing... but the stuff does go bad...

    Mineral oil is about 2 bux for a pretty big bottle.. and you can use it for a salad dressing too.... if ya don't mind the rather bland taste... but,, the nice thing, . . . if ya use enough... by the end of the next day, "you" will no longer be full of sh** ... :p so there are peripheral benefits..

    rk
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2019
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  11. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Rosewood is naturally oily so the olive oil isn't likely to go very deep.
    You might have wiped off 80% and then removed the rest with fretting fingers.
    Olive oil takes quite a while to go rancid, but rancid oil is pretty gross.
    I buy olive oil in gallon cans and keep it in the refrigerator until opened, then keep it cool.

    No mishaps doesn't equal good method...
     
  12. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    What do you mean by "dries after a month"?
    Are you looking for an oily feel?
    Are you looking for a glossy finish?
    There are Tung Oil Finish products that harden and leave a glossy or semi glossy finish, if that's your goal.
    Very few of my rosewood boards ever appear dry, the only time I oil them (mineral oil) is when new.

    I've certainly seen those sort of gray looking RW boards, and since I don't like the gray rosewood look, I don't buy guitars with that kind of RW.

    What you may be doing is trying to make one species look like another.
    I'd suggest applying a finish that darkens and hardens, rather than putting salad oil on your gray rosewood.

    The fact that olive oil rots and becomes rancid is a scientific fact.
    Rubbing most of it off and not being able to smell it doesn't negate that fact.
     
  13. 4pickupguy

    4pickupguy Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I just emailed Warmoth to see what they recommend for the rosewood necks I purchased from them. Looking on the FAQs of some brand-x manufacturer and they suggested Bore (which is rosewood & rosewood family oils) or rosewood oil. They said under no circumstances should one use ANYTHING with silicone in it and silicone lubricants can be found in many ‘mystery oil’ products.

    Very curious to see what Warmoth is going to say..
     
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  14. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    you guys . . really, what do any of ya think oiling the fingerboard with anything will do for the guitar? Then next, what do a think using something like an oil, engineered for cork seals (bore oil) or Lemons, will do for the guitar.. (why anyone would need to oil a lemon is beyond me too..:lol:) Or another non guitar related products... What DO YOU GUYS expect the benefit to be?

    What do y'all think you're gonna discover on the shelves of the local Hardware store, Grocery Store or any other store that gonna do any dawggone thing BETTER than guitar oil or mineral oil?

    some of this logic is like sayin' "Im gonna polish my shoe soles so I can walk like I do..." < if that makes any sense to anyone, leme know OK?

    remember,

    1, a fingerboard rarely needs Oil.. any oil..
    2, Oiling a fingerboard does nothing for much of anything... other than making the wood look darker.
    3, ya know.. I can't even think of a 3, since there isn't much sense in all this anyway...

    r
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2019
  15. Toadtele

    Toadtele Tele-Holic

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    I’m so confused by all of this. I’ve always used the lemon oil stuff. And sparingly at that
     
  16. Stratohacker

    Stratohacker Tele-Afflicted

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  17. Wrighty

    Wrighty Tele-Afflicted

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    Oh no! Someone just looked at my Strat.............have to buy a new one. I’ve used the polish / feed that I use on my oak table. Sparingly, once a year, seems to work
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2019
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  18. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Friend of Leo's

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    Yep, old family remedy. A teaspoon of coal oil will loosen you up. I think my parents were were the last generation to partake, I've abstained...

    I get the frustration though. Its like a magic feather. "I use this nifty product every week, and my stuff stays in good condition. See? It works!" Its even worse to see legitimate producers market products that are counterfeit.
     
  19. Wrighty

    Wrighty Tele-Afflicted

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    Liquidize ‘em
     
  20. Wrighty

    Wrighty Tele-Afflicted

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    Piles
     
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