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The Tipping Point - A question for advanced players

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by matrix, Sep 25, 2020.

  1. deytookerjaabs

    deytookerjaabs Friend of Leo's

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    So much this!

    I have friends who started early enough that they have monster ears but recognize harmony/melody so well they can't turn it off. I have to concentrate fairly hard when I transcribe, gets to be real work. But at the same time I can listen to any piece of music with my analysis brain off like any regular person...I like that feature.


    I used to have an F# I could voice as my lowest note to start from but as I've aged my voice has drifted too much to get a consistent pitch.
     
  2. Wizweird

    Wizweird TDPRI Member

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    Holy holy! Happy anniversary bro, by coincidence, I attracted my "little red haired girl 40 years ago. The first night we stayed together, mount saint Helens exploded! I kept her! Back on point, I've always said I would rather be a good entertainer, than a great guitarist
     
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  3. Karl Beach

    Karl Beach TDPRI Member

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    Stay tuned (pun). I'll dig up some info for you as time permits. Rock on!
     
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  4. Karl Beach

    Karl Beach TDPRI Member

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    Here's a great introductory video clip:



    To dig deeper, begin with a concise explanation of the current cosmological (a branch of science, not religion...although the two are increasingly interconnected as you'll see) understanding of the nature of all reality. This Scientific American article pretty much nails it:

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/information-in-the-holographic-univ/

    Here is a reasonably concise explanation of the human brain's physical characteristics vis-a-vis learning, but the somewhat-controversial holographic information storage model is not covered:

    https://human-memory.net/memory-storage/

    Next, an obtuse article published by the N.I.H. entitled: "Engrams in the human brain. Mechanisms of memory." Here's the link and, more quickly, the concluding quote (attached):

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1902435/

    And schema formation:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4407481/#:~:text=The brain therefore constructs a schematic model of,to conclude that it has a subjective experience.

    Here's a cutting-edge bit from M.I.T.:

    https://news.mit.edu/2020/engram-memories-form-1005

    And if you're a tech geek, here's a Microsoft overview of how computer data science is working to horn-in on the concept (laugh):

    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/project/hsd/
     

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    Last edited: Oct 11, 2020
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  5. Mjark

    Mjark Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I don't consider myself advanced but playing the guitar is much like anything else if you work on it you get better. I've played on and off for longer than I care to admit. There were definitely points along the way where I found I could do things I used to struggle with. My ear improved for instance. When I started lessons with a real pro, way too late I might add, more things became easier.
     
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  6. P Thought

    P Thought Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Very nice summary.

    They "taught" us this in teaching school.

    I think the class was called Learning Theory. There was special emphasis on repetition and review, and how many times a skill had to be practiced before it could be retained. . . .

    Then (if we were lucky) they threw us into a classroom and rotated 150-200 kids a day through it, 40 minutes at a time, and gave us a list of "standards" that students were expected to "meet" so we could be "accountable" and regarded as competent teachers by the many groups and individuals who cared about such things. There was never time to review what we'd "learned" about schema, or to review our learning-theory textbook even if we'd kept it, or to deliver a workable number of practice sessions to ensure that learning would take place.

    Students learn constantly, no matter what. But "teaching" is a very funny thing, depending as it does upon what, how, and whether the student is learning. @Karl Beach, I see "lifelong learner" in your signature line. I believe still (retired now) that promoting that idea to each of our students was the best we could do along the lines of really "teaching" anyone anything. I put much, maybe most, of my effort into engaging their interest, in the hope that they'd take it from there.

    To "tipping points" and guitar-playing: every student has to take responsibility for building ther own schema. It takes lots of practice, and it takes a long time. Teachers can help, but they can't do it for you.

    I might never call myself an "advanced" player, though I am far better than I was ten years ago, and a little better than I was a year ago. I just keep learning and playing, and "good" keeps moving out in front of me.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2020
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