The Secrets to the Sound of Stradivari and Amati

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Stanford Guitar, Apr 9, 2020.

  1. Stanford Guitar

    Stanford Guitar Tele-Meister

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    PhredE and Fretting out like this.
  2. Dave_11

    Dave_11 TDPRI Member

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    Yup

     
  3. Fretting out

    Fretting out Friend of Leo's

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    I’m furious! No one ever talks about how 90% of these famous violins have been renecked to make playing modern music possible

    And when they do it’s skimmed over

    So I guess in a couple hundred years if they reneck our current guitars to fit their times then yes they can be similar

    At this point it’s just guessing unless we find a note from Stradivari that says “eh I put effort into making my instruments sound like a voice!” Who knows how they even sounded when new, probably completely different

    I know I know I’m ridiculous
     
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  4. scooteraz

    scooteraz Friend of Leo's

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    The article does not seem to really provide any secret other than “they sound good”, surrounded by a bunch of really scientific sounding verbiage. But what is the secret? Specific shaping? The glue? The finish? The original lumber? Heck, they didn’t even say that the violins tested were unique. The door was left open the door that current production violins could have the same measured audio qualities to the old masters.


    As to whether we are living in a time when amazing acoustic guitars are being built, the answer is yes. Probably as good of guitars as any ever, at least in my experience. I also know that I found a really great new mandolin that even made me sound amazing a few years ago. Sounded in person like the recordings of the mandolins of yore. Really amazing tones. Of course I have never actually held a magical vintage Gibson mandolin, so take my opinion with a huge grain of salt. Still, I have three acoustic guitars built in within the last three decades that all sound great.
     
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  5. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Blindfold tests have pitted even new white wood fiddles against Strads and other multi million dollar vintage violins - with very mixed results .
     
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  6. stxrus

    stxrus Friend of Leo's

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    I don’t expect my SG, Tele, LP, or Strat to play like a very vintage Italian violin. My Washburn acoustic even less
     
  7. Masmus

    Masmus Tele-Meister

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    I Have a friend who suggested I remove the frets sand down the fretboard and install new ones in a fan fret pattern on my most vintage guitar.
     
  8. Torren61

    Torren61 Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    It's all in the fingers...
     
  9. PhredE

    PhredE Tele-Meister

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    I would tend to agree. And..

    Even modest mid-grade instruments made now would compare favorably against some of the classic/vintage models made by the most revered builders (eg; Torres, Hauser, Fleta, etc) in terms of sound simply because the availability of new and better strings too (eg; carbon or titanium trebles)!

    An 'average' guitar can be made to sound pretty darn good if it is setup properly, have decent materials and good strings (and, of course, some talent by the player..)
     
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  10. toomuchfun

    toomuchfun Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm going with the wood aspect. I saw a show where they found the really thin rings in the wood. I could be wrong but I think the necks were shortened. Still an alteration but the body is more vital for the sound to me.

    I feel we are in the era of great guitar building but there is certainly something to old wood. It grew at it's own pace and competed with neighboring trees. Today much of it's farmed and grows faster. My '23 Martin 0-18 and ''56 Tele have a feel and sound of their own.
     
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  11. dogmeat

    dogmeat Tele-Afflicted

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    gotta go with tone wood

    Stradivari signed his early work Amati
     
  12. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Some violinists insist that Guaneri violins are better or as good.. He only lived for 46 years and produced beautiful sounding instruments.
    He didn't live to 90+ as did Stradivari, did not have a son and a team working with him yet the debate is that his instruments are just as good. So who's the better luthier? One single man who made great violins in such a short time or man who lived twice as long and had a team of luthiers working with him?
     
  13. Deeve

    Deeve Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I'd be interested in outcome of blind tests of these pickups w/ much robust ad-copy and (possibly) indistinguishable fabrication methods.
    Except, of course, the height of the wood-nymph who rides the unicorn that carts in the "organic sag & bloom" powder.
    :rolleyes:
    Or whatever they say in ads...
    o_O
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2020
  14. loco gringo

    loco gringo Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

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    In the 80's, there was a professor at Texas A & M that was working on duplicating some old violins. I think one of his theories about the Strad's had to do with the logs being transported via a river and the minerals in the water in the river. This was a long time ago, but I think they had a CNC router and were making violins and having players test them.
     
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  15. OldDude2

    OldDude2 Tele-Afflicted

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  16. Stanford Guitar

    Stanford Guitar Tele-Meister

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    Very few would know the difference anyway.

     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2020
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