The "post-gig" depression: anyone else suffered it?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Marcelo R, Nov 26, 2018.

  1. Marcelo R

    Marcelo R Tele-Afflicted

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    Last saturday I played a gig with my band on a club in Montevideo. Despite some unfortunate events - one of my guitar cables got broken, so I had to plug direct into the amp, no effects - the gig ended pretty well and the audience was responsive. When all the thing was over and I got back home, suddenly I felt not only physically tired but with a certain sadness as well. Never happened to me before, not after a gig. It felt very strange, since I usually after a gig I'm tired, sure, but never sad.

    So, has anyone experienced something similar? Does this happens to us musician after a certain age - let's say, after 50? (I am 51). Or was just a momentary feeling that got me that night?

    I'll be glad to read your comments.

    Best regards.
     
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  2. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Friend of Leo's

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    Was the cable event stressful? If I work through something particularly stressful, I kind of feel withdrawn for a while after I finish whatever it was.
     
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  3. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Sort of.
    When I play (gig) with people I am not musically compatible with, I get bummed out.
    I’m a hired gun (mostly), so it happens occasionally.
    I do my best, but sometimes I am just part of a lame band.
    It actually embarrasses me.
    I have been a working player since I was 16, in 1973, so 45 years.
    Not every gig was great, believe me.
    I also get depressed when I don’t get enough gigs, or money from gigs to make ends meet.
    It still happens, and will continue to happen.
    I do not get discouraged, though.
    I still live for the “next one”.
     
  4. noah330

    noah330 Friend of Leo's

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    Nope, I've had a bunch of crazy stuff happen over the years. Once I slipped and fell on TV. No big deal, life happens.

    I wouldn't play with a lame band myself. Usually those 'show up and we'll play Mustang Sally and some blooze' are just a bunch of clowns and it's not worth $200 to be part of a clown act. Plus when you do that stuff you basically put yourself on that level with everyone watching.

    Be prepared, have a good attitude, be selective and do the best you can when something goes wrong.
     
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  5. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    It's been a couple of years since I've played with a steady band, so I had forgotten all about this subject, but the answer is yes.

    The last band that I was in that was all original, I had written all the music and lyrics (but I was not the singer/frontman)... and although we had top notch musicians playing with us (two guitars, bass, drums, B3, singer)... after every-single-gig I would be depressed for the rest of the night because it never sounded as good live as the sounds in my head. I wanted my music to be presented a certain way, and although the other guys in the band were very good, they were playing things their way much of the time, rather than the way I had communicated with them.

    For instance... the bass player was very, very good. I told him quite often that "less is more"... no slapping on these songs please... no bass chords in most places... single notes to hold down the bottom. He showed up to one rehearsal all jazzed up because he just bought a 6 string bass (with a plain high B string). There was no space in our music for 6 strings bass... it just didn't sound right. I needed him playing a basic four string P-bass.

    So yeah, I've been through that post-gig depression.
     
  6. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    Can't say I've ever been "depressed", but sometimes less than happy with my or band's performance. Not every gig can be "Queen at Live Aid" level.
    As far as your cable experience, now you've learned the lesson on back-up equipment.....carry extra strings, cables, microphones, batteries(if needed), picks, tools, even guitars and amps. Learn from the Boy Scouts.....Be Prepared! I can't remember the last time I've broken a string and needed to change guitars, but the spare is there if I need it.
    Hope you're back to "normal" now and look forward to your next gig......;)
     
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  7. WireLine

    WireLine Tele-Afflicted

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    I’ve been so (depressed) (angry) (frustrated) (embarrassed) (pick one or more) from gigs not living up to my impossibly high standards...

    But on the other hand, the positive ‘rush’ that comes from a great gig can last more than a day.
     
  8. darren7

    darren7 Tele-Holic

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    Could it be a post-adrenaline crash?
     
  9. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    I’ve been bummed when the sound is bad, or when somebody screwed up a song (once it was even me!).

    I’ve also had the letdown feeling after a gig that I was really pumped up for, even though it went well.

    Nowadays, I’m less nervous before playing, and the letdown is less too. Part of it is that I only play in a couple different contexts these days, and I’m pretty used to them now.
     
  10. ecoast

    ecoast Tele-Holic

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    I just start getting ready for the next one...always game
     
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  11. Rich_S

    Rich_S Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    The only times I play out are at reunions if my old band, which we only do about every two years on average. Musically, I live for these infrequent get-togethers with dear old friends. I practice a lot for months in advance to get ready for them. I travel 7 hours back to Philly for these gigs. We rehearse Friday afternoon, have a cookout, goof around Saturday. Saturday afternoon, we load in to a bar or similar venue, play a couple sets, and load out. Sunday I travel home, back to “real life”.

    I have a HUGE crash after the gig, and the whole next day. Deep down inside, I know regular gigging can get to be a drag, but experiencing that gig high just once every two years isn’t enough. The aftermath is quite depressing.
     
  12. alnico357

    alnico357 Tele-Holic

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    I have had equipment failures at gigs that bummed me out, but music makes me happy, and any situational depression I may experience is short lived. On to the next gig!
     
  13. kLyon

    kLyon Tele-Meister Gold Supporter

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    At the molecular (chemical?) level, an addiction is an addiction, a hangover is a hangover, and a crash is a crash.
    Whatever it is that floods your brain with serotonin - be it heroin, vodka, gambling, shopping (you can bet that there are a lot dopamine-deprived consumers in the US right now), sex, whatever - will create a low to follow the high.
    Yes, it seems to get worse with age, as the mechanisms that replenish serotonin become less robust.
    I definitely get depressed after particularly good gigs (more so than after bad ones) and really depressed after tours.
    It's the laws of physics on a personal level: what goes up, comes down.
    What do we expect? Of particle born and to particle returning, subject to the universal realities.
    (It is, arguably, harder for us... but then we have farther to fall))
     
  14. gitapik

    gitapik Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Losing your effects chain for a full gig can be a bummer if you use those pedals a lot.

    Getting through the night with a decent show despite the change is a sign of your professionalism. But I can see that effecting your mood, afterwards. The audience didn’t see the best side of you.

    We all get siderailed at times. Chalk it up to experience and bring spare cables next time.
     
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  15. gitapik

    gitapik Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Damn...that was good!
     
  16. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Luckily, since my gig rig is dirt simple (Chet or avatar guitar and Cube 80, 12 foot cord) my equipment never lets me down.
    I always have exta stuff in the car, just in case, too.
    It’s less than stellar performances on my part, or others that bums me out.
     
  17. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Before/during/after.

    The Grateful Dads never fail to leave me feeling anything except musically unfulfilled and ashamed at my participation.

    By the way - we have a gig on December 8th - come on out ! :lol::lol::lol:
     
  18. Fearnot

    Fearnot Friend of Leo's

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    Sure, and I used to get it bad. You get all cranked up for a show, physically and psychologically... then when it's over, you crash. That's why touring musicians can get messed up bad since their whole day is centered around the one or two hours on stage, then... nothing.

    For me, it only got better once I cranked it all back a few notches. Fewer gigs, and reducing demands and expectations. Enjoy it, but don't make it an all-or-nothing experience.
     
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  19. flatout9

    flatout9 Tele-Holic

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    Have had similar experiences when playing with two bands. It was too much and I found myself withdrawn and waiting for the last set to be over so I could bolt. Even paid the rest of the band so I wouldn't have to spend another hour there loading out. Realized I was burned and needed a new avenue... That's been about 5 years ago and I still don't have that urge to be in a band.

    I imagine it may come back at some point but for now I'm happy wood shedding and learning about home recording...
     
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  20. CigBurn

    CigBurn TDPRI Member

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    Don't forget a couple of basics as well, such as staying hydrated and making sure you aren't running on an empty stomach. It takes energy to stand there for three to four hours, then tear down and get home, especially so if things are stressful due to unexpected challenges. Running on empty lowers the blood sugar and can cause just this kind of crash.
     
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