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The music you're playing now, is it what you were playing when you started out?

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by JL_LI, Jul 4, 2018.

  1. Sparky2

    Sparky2 Friend of Leo's

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    I started out, back in the day, playing Hair Metal.

    No I'm playing Gray, Balding Metal.

    Life can be cruel.

    Hey, you kids, get off my lawn!!
    :(
     
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  2. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Fun thread.

    My earliest musical memory was sitting in a white, lead-painted high chair, smearing my face with mashed potatoes, while my maternal Polish grandfather serenaded me on his violin in front of many people. It wasn't singing that I first remember: it was a stringed instrument.

    Then I watched Hee Haw every Sunday, and I sure loved the music on there, which just looked like a lot of collective fun. When I hit my teens in the 80s, I started wanting to play Skynyrd, Petty, and arena rock covers of Van Halen. Then I went to college and was convinced by some co-eds to do a jazz radio show, which introduced me to all the jazz guitarists. I was knocked out in particular by Django Reinhardt, since his language was the easiest to understand. Wes Montgomery forward lost me because I didn't know what was going on, though I knew it must make sense.

    In the 90s, I started listening to country again and playing sideman to some country and jazz singers. In the 00s, I sailed for Byzantium and started listening to all kinds of world music. Here in the 10s, I'm playing in several projects, really all over the place in terms of style -- but you know what music I keep going back to?

    Classic country, at least up to the neo-trads of the 90s.

    I guess for me it's been a combination of inspiration, playing opportunity, and roots. Sometimes one or another takes the lead, which is ok.
     
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  3. Sparky2

    Sparky2 Friend of Leo's

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    Carpe Dio

    (Seize the metal)

    :eek:

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. raysachs

    raysachs Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I've never been good enough to really change all that much. I started out as a blues-rock player but with an emphasis on rock. I just never played rock that didn't come pretty directly from the blues. None of that prog or metal stuff for me. I didn't like it much and wouldn't have been able to play it if I had liked it. I loved the Dead but couldn't really get that far over into major scale territory so didn't play a lot of it. Lots of Stones, Clapton, Neil Young, Dylan, some Petty. Mostly pretty simple stuff. Little bits of Hendrix and ooooold Fleetwood Mac and other old British blues/rock stuff. And I got by 99% of the time with open chords, variations of the two basic barre chord positions, and the minor pentatonic scale. Oh, and I got pretty decent in Open G so I could play a lot of Keef riffs.

    Now I'm older and mellower and I play more just straight blues with a lot less rock feel to it. I barely played for about 30 years so I was stuck in the same place I left off when I got back into it again last year. But I have a lot of time on my hands and the amount of instructional material online is amazing, so I've gotten a fair amount more versatile, but still 99% as a blues player. I've added the various voicings of 7ths, 6ths and 9ths outside of the barre chord shapes and gotten comfortable sliding those around the neck. I've become a better rhythm player with the help of a looper. And I've gotten a lot more proficient mixing major pentatonic in wth my minor pentatonic playing. I always knew where the major lived, but I never really had a feel for it, but I'm getting there and loving doing call and response stuff between minor and major in a given solo. I'm even playing around at stuff with a jazz feel. It's not jazz, it's just jazzy feeling blues, but it's a different attitude and I like it a lot - fits my hormonal level these days... My only backsliding is I've basically lost the feel for playing Keef stuff in Open G. I know where it is, but I can't even sell myself on it anymore, so I'm not doing much of it.

    I'm still a really limited player who's nailed solidly down into the blues, but I'm getting better within that context and loving it more than ever. Kind of funny - I played out a lot in my first go around, played in a duo, pretty regularly with a couple of bands, was involved in some pretty epic jams. Now I'm basically playing on my own and very occasionally jamming with a friend. In a sense I'm better now than I was then but far FAR less ambitious about putting it out there...

    -Ray
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2018
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  5. 83siennateleguy

    83siennateleguy Tele-Meister

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    I grew up I'm the classic country music household. Or should I have said Country and Western music. Learned (and still learning) to play guitar at 14. Played in quite a few country bands and took a detour to a classic rock band for 7 years thanks to a coworker at the time who needed a Rythym player for 1 job. The 2nd set of the night had me doing some country classics because of a couple who were there that night celebrating there 40th wedding anniversary and wanted to hear a couple belly rubbing songs. Turned out the guy who had the band was a big classic country music lover and begged me to continue to play saying it would be a nice change to add that music to there set. I agreed and had a lot of fun playing both classic rock and country of course but that came to an end when the guy got sick suddenly and passed away. I guess I really never left that classic country music because the so-called country carp today is terrible. There's no identity to anything . Back in the day I knew what the song was by the intro or the fiddle or steel guitar licks. Whatever happened to a recitation in a song or a good story song ? I never left country music , but it sure did leave me. R.I.P. Haggard and Jones !
     
  6. Fiesta Red

    Fiesta Red Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm still playing the same stuff, overall...Texas Roadhouse Music (Blues + Classic Rock + Outlaw Country). Early on, it was Muddy Waters + Keith Richards + Waylon Jennings, as well as local (Fort Worth) heroes UP Wilson, Robert Ealey and Ray Sharpe...later, I added Jimmie Vaughan, Billy F Gibbons and the Arc Angels as influences in playing style, songwriting style and "on-stage" style.

    Texas singer-songwriters like Joe Ely and Charlie Robinson influenced my songwriting style, too.

    Stevie Ray was an influence to my guitar tone (I love his Albert King-meets-Jimi Hendrix-meets-Hubert Sumlin tone), but he didn't particularly influence my playing.

    As I started playing Harp, the biggest influences were Kim Wilson, Little Walter and Slim Harpo...with a touch a James Cotton thrown in (not as much as the previous three guys).

    In the last few years some lo-fi bluesy-rockers like Ray Wylie Hubbard, Dan Auerbach and Jack White as guitar influences--folks who were influenced by Lightning Hopkins, Junior Kimbrough and RL Burnside.

    I play significantly better than I used to--so much so that I am no longer nervous to play guitar or slide guitar in front of other musicians (I was always comfortable playing harp or singing in front of others).

    Sonically/Tone-wise, my tastes and goals have evolved. When I first started playing, I was the fill-in-the-blanks guy--I'd play the odd little rhythm section or secondary melody line in the song. Now, I'll play the lead parts as often as the rhythm parts.

    I'm a lot more adventurous than before...but I've cut down the number of effects I use (as well as the number of effects I'll use or combine). Consequently, I've developed a signature tone that's pretty identifiable, and most people--whether they're players or not--like that tone.

    At this point, I don't play like anybody in particular--I'm a combination of everything and everybody I love (which was my goal in the first place).

    I ain't great, and I'd never win a "cuttin' heads" contest, but I can sure entertain a crowd and enjoy myself doing it...and that's enough for me.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2018
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  7. Teddyjack

    Teddyjack Tele-Afflicted

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    I started out loving the Beatles (and still do) and trying with the help of my guitar teacher to figure out those songs. Played a lot of CCR, Elton John and Glen Campbell (my Mom loved him) in high school! Around 18 I really got into learning how to write songs and haven't really ever looked back although I still enjoy throwing a cover or two into the set as well. Great post - fun reading through everyone's responses.
     
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  8. McGlamRock

    McGlamRock Poster Extraordinaire

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    Oh yeah, I absolutely play the same music I was into when I started guitar. It is more rewarding now because I can play it a little better! :)

    Every once in a while I play something and I think to myself, that would have impressed the hell out of me when I was 13!
     
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  9. bendecaster

    bendecaster Friend of Leo's

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    I started out loving The Beatles too(and still do too)! I've played many different styles over the years and am the kinda guy that likes to throw myself into a situation with guys I think are much better than myself. Like, just jumping into the deep end! I've played classic rock, southern rock, instrumental rock, surf, country, instrumental country(the Hellecaster's and Will Ray, in general were a big reason I bought my first B-bender, an '80 Japan Squier with a P/W, my avatar), new wave, punk, female-vocalist rock, folk rock, jazz-ish stuff and now I'm in a very tight Tom Petty tribute band that makes it our business to be as spot-on with their music as possible! In my opinion, if someone comes to see your 'tribute band', they're not looking for 'your version' of those songs. I'll be 60 this year and I started out with my first acoustic guitar at 6. It's been a good run, and hopefully it'll continue!
     
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  10. raito

    raito Poster Extraordinaire

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    If you consider that I still like what I liked when I started out, plus some of the stuff that wasn't yet out when I started out, then yes, I play the same stuff.
     
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  11. kaisegall

    kaisegall TDPRI Member

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    Nope, I started out playing Linkin Park as a third grader (I was an edgy elementary school kid)
    I got into jazz a couple years after that... then I discovered fusion, and now I've completely ditched most of my rock playing habits. Every once in a while I'll still jam to a couple Radiohead or Incubus records though :)
     
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  12. The Angle

    The Angle Tele-Holic

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    Sort of. I started out playing John Denver, moved to Led Zeppelin and BTO when I went electric, and then jumped to swing and '70s jazz/pop (Maynard Ferguson, Chuck Mangione) in college. I still love swing and bebop, but lately most of my practice and relaxing time goes to the Muddy Waters/John Lee Hooker/B B King school of blues -- short and relatively simple with the instruments backing up and emphasizing the vocals instead of the more modern approach, where everything takes a back seat to the guitar.
     
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  13. Paul in Colorado

    Paul in Colorado Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I started out learning Dylan songs via The Byrds. My first band was influenced by Cream, Pink Floyd and some blues rock stuff. My first GOOD band played original country-rock (New Riders of the Purple Sage/ American Beauty era Grateful Dead...). I went on to play jam band stuff in college, singer-songwriter folky stuff, reggae, World Music, Celtic music, Old Time dance music, blues...

    There days I play in a four piece Country Blues Folk Rock band. I'm about to add my Rickenbacker 12 string to the mix, so I've come full circle. Mostly.
     
  14. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    If that isn't called "chrome", it should be.
     
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  15. Tele-beeb

    Tele-beeb Friend of Leo's

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    At my Papaws house there was Country and Western. Parents played that too, with 60’s pop mixed in.
    I watched Hee Haw as a young teen like it was mandatory.
    Teen years were spent with a mix of Blues Based Rock (invasion) and Outlaw Country/Southern Rock.
    Thank God as an adult CMT and The Nashville Network arrived.
    I find now my roots, my ears and my heart belong to Country (and Western) and a bit of Rock-a-Billy.
     
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  16. JL_LI

    JL_LI Friend of Leo's

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    Threads peter out so I wanted to be sure to thank everyone who posted for very interesting biographies, insights, and good humor. Thanks to all those who viewed the thread. I hope you enjoyed it. Participation is where the sense of community here at TDPRI comes from. I know I had fun with this and some of the posts got me thinking about new directions and also about re-exploring things I've done in the past. Thanks again everyone. Great fun!
     
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  17. cntry666

    cntry666 Friend of Leo's

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    Been playing punk, blues and country for 31 years. I’ve never played covers or done anything else. Love it.
     
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  18. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

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    My self diagnosed ADD won t allow that. It changes week to week, from black metal to western swing. Which makes me an amateur, except i can play a little bit of everything, but not as good as if i had stuck to a genre.
     
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  19. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    At first I would say no, but because I've never had a style like the way the record bins are separated in retail, instead playing music I liked or whatever was being played in my local music community; I really can't assign a music style to then or now.

    At the same time maybe I started out in a broad style possibly known as Americana, but the Stones were part of that and I'm not sure if their early British bred Country/ Blues American music was really Americana.
    If whites can play Blues then Brits can play Americana!

    I was told early on that I sounded like a cross between Doc Watson and Eric Clapton.
    Is there a style in that blend?
    It was certainly the '60s and early '70s music that drove my urge to play, and that era was one of mixing styles both on the bandstand and on radio, where we would hear Soul, Rock, and even Folk on the same station.
    I also listened to some early Jazz like Count Basie, which was really as much Americana along with Otis Redding, The Band, The Platters, Ten Years After, Jefferson Airplane, Pure Prairie League, The Drifters etc etc.
    I guess I should add Judy Collins' heavy subject matter as an influence to a little kid, plus Melanie and Don McClean because they played in my home and I knew most of the lyrics. Oh and Marat Sade! And of course Dylan, both Dylan Thomas and Bob Dylan, but they are like the air we breathe.

    The first stuff I actually worked on was Hot Tuna/ Jorma doing Rev Gary Davis.

    Really I have less and less of a clue what style of music I play now, but it's certainly nothing in record bins.

    One interesting thing about the America in Americana, is maybe that the US of America is a sort of experiment in uniting people.
    And the '60s was a powerfully focused decade in which much US course correction was attempted, while at the same time much American popular music shifted from primarily entertainment toward speaking for social movement as well as toward (in the case of Jazz) being more art than entertainment.
    Not that Woody and Pete didn't start the social movement aspect off much earlier...

    While the most "progressive" '60s Jazz was not on any radio I ever heard, it became the most central music in my music "study", and I tried to play a logical extension of that for more than 20 years. I still think (primitively) McCoy Tyner when playing guitar, more than Jorma, EC or Doc. Hell I even think Elvin Jones when playing guitar, but only a sprinkling of Coltrane. I did develop a phrasing style more sax like than guitarist like, and may have taken as much from Eric Dolphy as Coltrane, whose sudden explosions fit in my overtaxed brain more easily than the wall of sound which I could never really get out of guitar in any satisfying manner.

    Rather than seeing music style as a record bin or a geographic locale or a set of instruments, I see my music style as being related to art and culture, to a movement of art and culture.

    So maybe I'm playing the same style as when I started out.

    It's funny though my earliest beloved music was The Band, and I didn't really know Robbie or the Telecaster, and as a 7-10 yo I would sing all those songs and wanted to be like Rick Danko, just laying back with my eyes closed singing my heart out.
    My later voice was prone to breaking down and I'm still as much frustrated singer trying to sing with a guitar.

    If I had to point to the central origin, I'd have to say it's African American.
    And I'm pretty much Aryan, so there's that.

    *** Bless America!
     
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  20. refin

    refin Friend of Leo's

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    Yes,I am still playing a lot of the same tunes....even Mustang Sally (ducks down behind couch).
     
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