The Gospel According to the Meninblack

THX1123

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Not a guitar-heavy Stranglers record, but it has its moments.

I found the album in 1982 on cassette at a local Ames department store in the bargain bin, which was odd as it was only 1 year old at that time.

Like Crocodiles by Echo & the Bunnymen it was a record I listened to quite a lot, but didn't really share with others. I got a promo LP copy of Crocodiles in early 1981. My Dad brought it home. He got it from some record promo guy he sold a car to. The guy just gave him several albums. In a world dominated by Journey and Foreigner and Culture Club they were literally giving those kinds of records away.

I was very lucky to get these albums, especially Crocodiles. I lived in a Dairy Farming town of about 4500 people in the heavy snow region/ski country. There were no real record stores for 30 miles. Those stores that were that close were just lame Shopping Mall stores. I remember holding the dusty copy they had of The Fall's Live at the Witch Trials in my hands. I almost bought it at least 6 times. I wish I would have. I love The Fall now.

As a kid I found Meninblack pretty disturbing and kinda goofy at the same time. It is mostly a concept album. It is like junkie new wave, or some paranoid's brief flash of optimism, or The Strokes' weird Uncle's band. I still like it.





 

aging_rocker

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Meninblack was considered a bit of a strange one at the time, if I remember correctly. I haven't listened to it since the early 80s, so time for a re-visit perhaps.

'Crocodiles' was a milestone album for me. Brilliant.

And The Fall - never a dull moment there :cool:
 

THX1123

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Meninblack was considered a bit of a strange one at the time, if I remember correctly. I haven't listened to it since the early 80s, so time for a re-visit perhaps.

'Crocodiles' was a milestone album for me. Brilliant.

And The Fall - never a dull moment there :cool:
I am a Fall fan. I know only one other Fall fan in real life. He grew up in the UK and saw them in the Brix era. Well, I wouldn't call him a big fan, he has none of their albums. But he is aware of them and enjoyed their music.

I was listening to "Fall in a Hole" in my office whilst working last week. You appear to be a Kiwi. I know that was recorded in Auckland. I like that lineup/period of the band. I lived in ChCh for a year before the quake. Sometimes I wish I had stayed, sometimes not so much.
 

Spox

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I have the vinyl from when I was about fifteen, I bought it around 1984. It's a strange album but I like that they were willing to change as a band. I was really into them as a teenager, I'd painted my room at my folks black and red walls, low coloured spotlights and their spread wing raven logo and name on my door. I saw them three tours running in three different venues in the mid 80s. I was listening to Longships/The Raven just before bed last night. I think they kind of ran out of steam and that's why Hugh left and without him it wasn't really The Stranglers anymore to me and I lost interest. I have all of the albums up to Dreamtime on vinyl.

Re Echo And The Bunnymen, I can take or leave them, Julian Copes' autobiography is quite funny, he was tight friends with Pete De Freitas but there is clearly some friction apparent between him and Ian McCullough in the book.

Re The Fall, love them. Saw them live a few times. The Peel Sessions are something to listen to if you are not already familiar with them, listen to all of them chronologically to get an excellent view of the band changing. I would also recommend Steve Hanleys book, The Big Midweek, his autobiography about his nineteen years as bass player for The Fall. Last Fall book I read was Have A Bleedin' Guess by his brother Paul, it is also excellent and is about his time as drummer in the Fall particulary the Hex Enduction Hour period. Both of these books were money well spent on my part. Brixs' book is also good as is MES's book. Spinal Tap don't have a look in.
 

THX1123

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I have the vinyl from when I was about fifteen, I bought it around 1984. It's a strange album but I like that they were willing to change as a band. I was really into them as a teenager, I'd painted my room at my folks black and red walls, low coloured spotlights and their spread wing raven logo and name on my door. I saw them three tours running in three different venues in the mid 80s. I was listening to Longships/The Raven just before bed last night. I think they kind of ran out of steam and that's why Hugh left and without him it wasn't really The Stranglers anymore to me and I lost interest. I have all of the albums up to Dreamtime on vinyl.

Re Echo And The Bunnymen, I can take or leave them, Julian Copes' autobiography is quite funny, he was tight friends with Pete De Freitas but there is clearly some friction apparent between him and Ian McCullough in the book.

Re The Fall, love them. Saw them live a few times. The Peel Sessions are something to listen to if you are not already familiar with them, listen to all of them chronologically to get an excellent view of the band changing. I would also recommend Steve Hanleys book, The Big Midweek, his autobiography about his nineteen years as bass player for The Fall. Last Fall book I read was Have A Bleedin' Guess by his brother Paul, it is also excellent and is about his time as drummer in the Fall particulary the Hex Enduction Hour period. Both of these books were money well spent on my part. Brixs' book is also good as is MES's book. Spinal Tap don't have a look in.
Wow...I actually started my proper appreciation of the Fall with the Peel Anthology box set. I bought Kurious Oranj when it came out after seeing a video on MTV. I still love that album, but my head was elsewhere at that time. I had heard Rebellious Jukebox on a compilation as well, but that was as far as I went until around 2006. I started with the Peel Set & the Rough Trade Totally Wired singles set and was pretty much hooked. Now all I am missing are a few of the later albums.

I've got the Hanley Brother's Fall books (as well as Leave the Capital, which was really interesting to me) and loved them. Brix's was pretty good also. The MES book made more sense on the second reading after reading those other books. I also quite enjoyed Excavate! I thought Wolstencroft's book was good also.

I will read Julian Cope's book on your suggestion. I liked his first batch of solo records a lot in the day. Next on my list (after a Napoleon bio that is massive) are the new John McGeoch bio that just came out and Gary Numan's autobio.

 

Spox

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Wow...I actually started my proper appreciation of the Fall with the Peel Anthology box set. I bought Kurious Oranj when it came out after seeing a video on MTV. I still love that album, but my head was elsewhere at that time. I had heard Rebellious Jukebox on a compilation as well, but that was as far as I went until around 2006. I started with the Peel Set & the Rough Trade Totally Wired singles set and was pretty much hooked. Now all I am missing are a few of the later albums.

I've got the Hanley Brother's Fall books (as well as Leave the Capital, which was really interesting to me) and loved them. Brix's was pretty good also. The MES book made more sense on the second reading after reading those other books. I also quite enjoyed Excavate! I thought Wolstencroft's book was good also.

I will read Julian Cope's book on your suggestion. I liked his first batch of solo records a lot in the day. Next on my list (after a Napoleon bio that is massive) are the new John McGeoch bio that just came out and Gary Numan's autobio.

I haven't read Leave The Capital but will try to remember to buy it. Renegade was the same with me, enjoyed it much more second time around. I have Excavate in the unread pile. The John McGeoch and Gary Numan books sound worth investing in, thanks for the heads up.
 




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