The future of Peavey

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by jayroc1, Feb 17, 2021.

  1. alexman

    alexman TDPRI Member

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    Maybe I'd really love to see the t series guitars come back.i can dream...I'll continue to love my old peavey gear.ive been playing on my heritage vtx amp for just over twenty years I see it being my go to for twenty more.im not too concerned about them bringing back made in usa stuff.bc theres a ton of old peavey stuff that's underrated making it affordable for me
     
  2. Mowgli

    Mowgli Tele-Meister

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    I've read TDPRI for years. Finally decided to join. One reason I joined was the diversity of perspectives and knowledge from which I learn a great deal.

    I'd like to offer an additional and complimentary view of many of the offerings put forth so far.

    Sometime in the 70s - following the Business Roundtable's embrace of "The (Louis) Powell Memo" - the beginnings of a seismic shift in the increasing power of large corporations began in a major way. This power wrought by PR campaigns and the unleashing of increasing numbers of lobbyists onto DC politicians led to government passing insane amounts of corporate-written legislation that favored corporate interests over the interests of most citizens.

    Ever since this corporate takeover of both federal and state governments trade deals and laws have increasingly facilitated the exporting of manufacturing to exploit cheaper labor and taxpayer infrastructure development to aid large corporations like Walmart. Walmart, for example, had town governments invest taxpayer dollars to pave roads and erect street and traffic lights so Walmart could provide a good number of low-paying jobs while helping Walmart out-compete and put out of business local hardware, fabric, grocery, sporting goods, drug and other stores. And, yes, Ross Perot was correct about NAFTA; around a million good paying job losses resulted from this trade deal.

    At the same time, there emerged a parallel industry of "schooled" business experts (i.e. MBAs) who convinced an entire generation that American corporations who used cheaper labor and cheaper resources would pass along these savings and both businesses and consumers would win. But they didn't speak about good job losses and the widespread raiding of pension funds enabled by law changes advanced by business executives and MBAs.

    Meanwhile these MBAs also led efforts to inject these "business approaches" into industries like medicine, music and movies industries, etc.

    Think about this example: Leo selling out to CBS. He made a huge profit on the sale and his "non-compete" agreement stalled his "Tri-sonic/Music Man" project a few years. BUT Fender didn't export their manufacturing until much later when Fender switched hands again... during the era when "business professionals (MBAs)" advised executives and investors to exploit cheaper labor and materials offshore. This led to the Squier and MIJ lines of guitars. The early Japanese stuff was outstanding. Read about Deming if you want to learn about quality production. The later stuff was much more variable and the brand began to take a hit.

    But let's be clear - these moves were all done to maximize executive and shareholder profits, not to make a better product.

    This is what MBAs do to companies. Their focus is on maximizing profits - specifically short-term profits - for themselves, executives and the shareholders.

    And if shares are publicly held, the management is tasked with meeting quarterly projections because their bonuses depend on meeting or exceeding those quarterly stock price goals. This leads to a short-term maximize profit mindset and quality becomes an afterthought.

    And as long as marketing can convince enough of the public to buy these lower quality products, the executives and shareholders are safe until the public tires of crappy products regardless of the name affixed to them.

    Just look at Gibson. Their terrible decisions of the past were made by private equity Mergers and Aquisitions lawyers/MBA-types, not musicians. A lot people bought sub-par guitars just because the Gibson name was attached. In the early aughts I played several new Gibsons at a Guitar Center (GC was owned by Mitt Romney's Bain Capital). These new Gibsons paled next to my vintage Gibsons. They were really bad.

    Someone should write a book "How MBAs Chased Short-term Profit Goals, Got Rich and Ruined Beloved Brands for the Rest of Us."

    Peavey (I own four Peavey amps from the 70s & 80s which are fantastic and like the people I met at their Meridian service center.) is just late to the game. I suspect Hartley et al probably consulted some group like Mckinsey who told them that they could make greater profits by offshoring. I doubt that consumer satisfaction was a major topic of conversation.
     
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  3. Esquier

    Esquier TDPRI Member

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  4. Esquier

    Esquier TDPRI Member

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    Aluminum is manufactured. It's not ore!
     
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  5. Masmus

    Masmus Tele-Holic

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    I hadn't thought of this for years. My first amp was a used Peavey because I couldn't afford the Marshall I wanted. Once I got that Marshall I never looked back. I have a Classic now because I wanted to have some diversity in my recording.
     
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  6. Ronzo

    Ronzo Tele-Afflicted

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    Bauxite is the ore from which aluminum is processed. Processed rather than manufactured.
     
  7. qpond

    qpond TDPRI Member

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    Bauxite?
     
  8. PhoenixBill

    PhoenixBill Tele-Meister

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    Chicken McNuggets are manufactured. Aluminum, being an element, cannot be manufactured. It comes from aluminum ore, primarily bauxite. It is easily recycled but we still need a lot of “new” aluminum from bauxite.

    Hit up Wikipedia on bauxite (and note that the US isn’t in the list of countries with bauxite production):

    Bauxite is a sedimentary rock with a relatively high aluminium content. It is the world's main source of aluminium....
     
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  9. Frisco 57

    Frisco 57 Tele-Meister

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    A friend used to say, if your Peavey amp stops working, you likely forgot to pay your power bill.
     
  10. northernguitar

    northernguitar Friend of Leo's

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    Curious if anyone has tried any of the mini-heads Peavey released a few years ago. There was a 6505, Classic 20 and a Valve King.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2021
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  11. Delara84

    Delara84 TDPRI Member

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    I believe those days are gone. Overseas costs for a budget amp like Peavey makes it the best business option. My High School buddy back in the late 70’s had a Peavey Classic 212 VT Series. The Hybrid with the Solid State Preamp and Tube Power Section he bought new in 78’. Sounded pretty good as I recall. We lugged that bad boy along with my Acoustic 150 SS head with the 2X15 Acoustic 106 cabinet to backyard parties all over SoCal and they never failed. That budget stuff was rock solid. I remember we would switch instruments mid song to blow peoples minds and I enjoyed playing through the Peavey. Ok I’m back from my trip down Memory Lane... As I said those days are Long Gone!
     
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  12. mojavedesert

    mojavedesert Tele-Meister

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    I have 1970's "Vintage" Tweed 4 x 10 alnico jensens, 4 x 6L6, crazy preamp tubes like buttons on a Peacoat. Sounds good I've been using it for outside gigs during the covid no indoor gigs period. It's lot lighter than a Twin and sounds pretty close to a twin. Pine dovetail cabinet. Louder that you'd ever need. Bought it used, never did anything to it except turn it on, a work horse. Merle used these amps, you can see two of them behind him in many 70's--2000's videos.
     
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  13. GreatDaneRock

    GreatDaneRock Tele-Holic

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    They are lovely, my classic 20mh is a magnificent piece of kit.
     
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  14. MrGibbly

    MrGibbly Tele-Afflicted

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    Hartley is no longer running the business.
     
  15. Ronzo

    Ronzo Tele-Afflicted

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    NOT TRUE, per Peavey’s website:
    https://peavey.com/c/Corporate-Profile

    Hartley Peavey is the Founder and CEO. Mary Peavey is the President. Courtland Gray in the Chief Operating Officer (COO).

    “A pox on both their houses.”
     
  16. Bluey

    Bluey Tele-Meister

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    To be brutally honest & no offence intended. From a international point of view no one in any sane frame of mind would invest in a business in the USA it's a total cluster f_(k & has been for 20 years. Politics aside ... from outside looking in multinational corporate rip off success or homeless bum seems to be the option. With a **** load of bu!!$it in between. The USA dropped the ball long ago & are now hopefully looking at the score board.
     
  17. codamedia

    codamedia Poster Extraordinaire

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    I know a lot of people are upset over the last 3 minutes of the undercover boss episode... but business is business and sadly plants close & lay offs do occur. It was just ill-fated timing!

    What bothered me most about the episode (2015) was the obvious loss of the Peavey culture. IMO, that began it's journey downhill in 1998 when Melia Peavey (Hartley's first wife and President of the Company) passed away. It was no secret that she was a huge part of the success of Peavey. Although she was very strong lady/boss she also preached charity, community and culture. I doubt she would have stood silently to watch people being stripped of holidays, work days, benefits, bonus', education assistance, etc... etc..

    Time marches on and the inevitable still would have happened... jobs would move off shore, plants still would have closed and people would have gotten laid off. BUT - I think there would have been a lot more openness, respect and dignity involved.

    FWIW... I can't stand the "undercover boss" series. It's suppose to be about improving the company and it's policies... instead it's produced as a feel good show with 3 -4 hand picked people that get to tell their story and collect "photo op" bonus'. IMO - this was the most honest episode I've seen!
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2021
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  18. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Poster Extraordinaire

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    Georgia becomes top 10 exporter state as manufacturing rebounds

    There's a lot of manufacturing being done here and in neighboring states, especially ones that require a lot of automation (that's the work I do). We have found it difficult to retain engineers and software developers because there's so much demand for these skills as well as for line workers who are comfortable with technology. Companies are seeing the advantage of shorter and more diverse supply chains now instead of depending on a small cluster of factories half a world away.
     
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  19. John_B

    John_B Tele-Meister

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    I do not know much about the Old vs the New Peavey, I have not followed Peavey for years. I wish I still had the Bandit I had in the late 1980's.

    The little indie Music store I repair at just became a Peavey dealer. I am very happy for the store! I raise my beer to Peavey for this!
     
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  20. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    Someone should write a book "How MBAs Chased Short-term Profit Goals, Got Rich and Ruined Beloved Brands for the Rest of Us."

    Funnily enough, I got an MBA to add to my master's in oceanography so I could learn more about management. Scientists that run scientific agencies often lack management skills, and I didn't want to be that guy. Because I literally went to school on it, I am very familiar with the core concepts that were in vogue in the late 90s in business schools.

    One key concept in marketing is targeting a particular niche of the market where you can be the most competitive. Align your "core competency" with the right segment of the market. Do what you do well. The idea is you will not be very competitive if you try to work in a space you're not very good at.

    From that perspective, maybe Peavey just underestimated themselves. I imagine that they thought of themselves as a "value brand", and that therefore they were mostly competing on price. They didn't see themselves as having the potential to pivot to being (and being perceived as) a "high quality" brand, for which prices could be raised if necessary to maintain reasonable profitability. You can't replay the movie-- what's done is done. But it makes one wonder whether they could have gone down a different road-- competing on quality rather than price. In other words, position themselves more like Mesa Boogie did around that same era.
     
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