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The future of Peavey

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by jayroc1, Feb 17, 2021.

  1. Stinger22

    Stinger22 Tele-Meister

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    I still have an old 1970's Duce. Weighs a ton and LOUD! I had sold the plant a few things a long time ago. Called on, actually just stopped by to see what was left a few years ago and nothing left but logistics. The repair center is offsite just outside Meridian.
     
  2. PhoenixBill

    PhoenixBill Tele-Meister

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    Those ‘Made in USA’ Ford Pintos or Chevrolet Novas?? Yep, that’s prime examples of fine American-made quality right there. Despite those folks who look back at American muscle cars with rose-colored glasses, the American automobile industry from the 50’s through the 90’s was atrocious as far as quality. Blaming Bill Gates and Microsoft for the decline of “American Quality” is ludicrous IMO because it wasn’t really there to start with.

    The harsh reality is that American manufacturing is on the decline largely because we no longer have the natural resources to pump out cheap products. No amount of political posturing or promises that “we’ll make it great again” can replace the aluminum ore that we’ve depleted—we have no more large deposits of aluminum ore left in the US. Iron ore is almost gone. We’ve mined almost all of the readily available coal. Massive deposits of iron, aluminum, and coal got us through World War 2 but they’re gone.

    Some vital metals are not found in America at all. Cobalt and chromium for example, we have to import those because we simply don’t have the ore available here. No politician, no political party, no Act of Congress can suddenly give us that.

    England found itself in the same situation over a century ago, but survived as a world leader from their colonial empire. Once that was broken up though, their dominance subsided. Japan is in the same situation now but is doing well overall because they are focusing on manufacturing excellence and good business practices.

    American companies can compete and win, but they must structure themselves to have some sort of competitive advantage. Management must do their part: they must know their business, and make smart business decisions. That’s the root cause of many American company failures: senior management doesn’t really know their company’s operations from a technical level, and they make decisions based on next quarter’s dividends rather than long-term success. I’ve heard managers say “we don’t need to know the details of our company, we just need to know how to manage”...baloney! You must know how to play football to be a football coach, you can’t just walk in and tell your team “okay go score, and keep the other team from scoring, and we’ll win. how? That’s your problem, I’m the coach”

    Peavey got its initial success because he knew electronics and was savvy at manufacturing. As time passed, he got further removed, the company got bigger and eventually it went downhill.
     
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  3. RoyalBaby

    RoyalBaby Tele-Afflicted

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    I was made redundant about four years ago and unemployed for a few months and, sadly, daytime TV became part of the routine. One of the channels was showing old episodes of Undercover Boss USA and they were generally puff pieces for the companies showing they how they had got a few things wrong but the CEOs were really lovely people and everything was all good now. But not Peavey, must have been the only company that took what was essentially an hour’s free advertising and made themselves look like idiots.
     
  4. Delmerson

    Delmerson TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

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    While emotionally satisfying to purchase American made products make no mistake that the jobs that are being created by firms "coming back" to this country are very poor jobs indeed. Very low wage with minimum (if any benefits), unless you are buying, for example, an American car made in a union shop many jobs you are supporting are typically not what one would consider "livable wage" jobs. There are, of course exceptions, but consumers will always be looking for a "good deal" leaving manufactures no option but to find cheep labor wherever in the world it may be. Made in USA does not represent decent US jobs like it once did.
     
  5. warrent

    warrent Friend of Leo's

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    This is a better comparison than you think it is. All three companies are private and still owned by the founding families, they are close in size and in the case of Traynor similar in markets served.
    For 2018 sales were Peavey 95M, Godin 65M and Traynor 78M.
    But Yorkville sound which is the corporate parent of Traynor is part of Long and McQuade's which is a much larger company (360M in sales) also owned by the Long family. And Godin is run by Roberts sons Simon and Patrick.

    It all comes down to choices the owners make. You can talk about competition and globalization supply chains etc. but the owners still decide what sort of company they want to run.
    Peavey went for the cheapest and easiest route, Godin invests and modernizes his factories to keep them competitive (having a large wood supply next to his factories doesn't hurt) and Yorkville does a mix, some stuff like ART is designed here and made off shore other stuff like higher end PA equipment and Traynor amps are made in Canada.
     
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  6. Esquire Jones

    Esquire Jones Tele-Meister

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    There is an interview on YouTube with the guy that designed the 5150 with Eddie. Really super interesting conversation about the details of the concept and engineering and manufacturing of the amp. It was a big event for them as a company.
    Many metal bands in the 90’s specified 5150 amps in their riders. Those amps rocked hard and were part of that Metal movement. No, they’re not built like Soldano amps but they don’t cost $4K either.

    Life is complicated and sometimes unfair. That’s all I got.
     
  7. IceGator8

    IceGator8 TDPRI Member

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    I'm pretty sure Peavey is experimenting with European construction. An example is the new version of the Wolfgang called the HP 2 which is made in the Czech Republic. The guitar is excellent from a quality perspective. It's not as cheap as an Asian version but the quality is there.
     
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  8. omahaaudio

    omahaaudio Friend of Leo's

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    And?

    I still remember when WalMart advertised that they were proud to sell American-made goods.

    All sorts of yellow smiley-faced signs and everything.

    It's sad how it's all turned out.
     
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  9. Swampertech

    Swampertech TDPRI Member

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    Vance, I've got a great story for your friend at Peavey. In the mid 60's I was in a band from Alabama, and we played jobs all over the South. One night we were playing in Meridian, and there was a kid that stood and intently watched our guitar player, who was a killer R & B picker. On the 1st break, the kid asked our guitar player if he wanted to trade his guitar for a Les Paul. The next break, the kid comes back carrying a case with a beautiful sunburst Les Paul guitar inside. So our guitarist traded even his 1966 cherry Gibson 335 for the Les Paul. After the gig, the kid was still there, and asked us if we'd like to see his Dad's music shop where he was making amplifiers. He even said his Dad would give us amplifiers to play for free. At the time, our guitarist played a SF Super Reverb, and we sort of chuckled about the new amps. We drove downtown to a little music store. It was named Peavey's.
     
  10. Danny B.

    Danny B. TDPRI Member

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    The song “Rust Belt Fields” by Slaid Cleaves is very relevant to this conversation. I hate seeing jobs go overseas. I wish things were different and I wish Peavey were still here making good American products.
     
  11. Vermoulian

    Vermoulian Tele-Meister

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    Peavey's initial success was due to its ability to exploit a hole in the market, and that hole is not there anymore.

    Back in the late 70s and early 80s (when I was just getting started playing electric guitar) there was no such thing as a mid-tier music product. You had the major name brands (Marshall, Fender, etc.) and then you had junk. And if you were looking for PA gear, forget about it. Into that world came Peavey, offering solid, dependable gear at prices that regular folks could afford. I, and just about everybody I knew, used Peavey gear of some sort at that time. But here's the thing: almost nobody went into any deal wanting Peavey gear; you ended up with Peavey gear because you couldn't afford that Marshall you REALLY wanted, or even find one in your midwestern town.

    That's not to say that Peavey didn't make some objectively decent stuff, or good gear for its price, but it did position Peavey poorly for dealing with the influx of mid-priced imported stuff. It could only go so low competing on price, given its American labor costs, but at the same time, it didn't have the name brand cachet that Fender or Marshall had to keep selling its products at higher prices. People will pay more to get a real Marshall, but very few people will pay more to get a real Peavey. It actually caught lightning a few times: the 5150/6560 series and the Classic 30 were both hugely successful, but the 5150/6505 was a niche product and lost some of its coolness when Eddie Van Halen moved to Fender, and the Classic 30 (i.e., the tube Bandit) was a good solid amp at a reasonable price but they could only go so far up market with that being a PCB amp and, you know, a Peavey.

    To come back as an American manufacturing concern, Peavey would have to be able to sell its American-made products at a price commensurate with production costs, and I don't think there is enough of a market that will pay extra for an American Peavey. Maybe I'm wrong. And I don't say this as a Peavey hater. I've had plenty of Peavey gear and one of my favorite basses to this day is a mid-90s Fury. (Peavey guitars and basses are a whole other subject.)
     
  12. Marblatx

    Marblatx TDPRI Member

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    I'm not a tube snob and have always liked Peavey amps. They were the objects of my dreams back in the 60s and 70s when I was growing up. While they will probably never get back to the old days of US production the good news is they never die and there's still a lot of equipment out there and for reasonable prices. I own 3 I got at auction for a total of $77.
     
  13. Marblatx

    Marblatx TDPRI Member

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    I've owned three T-style guitars. A 1983 Telecaster made in USA A Squier Bullet made in Indonesia and an SX made in China. In my honest opinion China wins.
     
  14. hepular

    hepular Tele-Holic

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    confession-time: the building materials for the loft my roommate and i constructed in our apartment came from the construction site of the 1st walmart in College Station. Roommate really got a kick out of it because he's from Conway, AR. So, I can remember the "more than 2 people in a line open a new checkout policy they started with" and be thankful that i went to college before the advent of security cameras .. .
     
  15. Marblatx

    Marblatx TDPRI Member

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    The company I worked for went to hell for the same reasons. It was a company founder by engineers and technicians who had a specific goal in mind and accomplished it with flying colors. Then somebody else took over the company and decided to go in a different direction. First they wen to the salesmen and asked what would impress the customers who then went to the engineers and computer guys to make that happen. The result was equipment that no longer worked.
     
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  16. McGlamRock

    McGlamRock Poster Extraordinaire

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    I finally watched the Undercover Boss episode several people mentioned. I've seen a few episodes of that show before but this was by far the worse. It's as if they did something to piss off the people at the network.
     
  17. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've lived through that more than once. The worst are managers who, when you tell them something is a terrible idea, give you a copy of Who Moved My Cheese? to read.
     
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  18. PhoenixBill

    PhoenixBill Tele-Meister

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    When I was a young engineer, many times I had managers ask me to do stuff that was pretty much impossible unless I could bend the laws of physics. Unfortunately I wasn’t very diplomatic at the time and I would tell them why their idea couldn’t be done. Before long I was being downgraded on my evaluations as being “too negative”....excuse me? You have the dumbest managers on the entire planet and I am the one getting bad reviews?

    However, I finally wised up. Whenever I would get a manger coming up to me with a stupid idea, I would hear them out with a feigned look of thoughtful consideration, then say something like “hmm, that’s an interesting idea, I could see why you would want that. Let me study it some, I can see some challenges that we might have to overcome, and I will get back to you.” Usually they would go away happy and the next day some other shiny object would grab their attention and they would never ask me about it again. Eventually it worked out well enough that I became a manager too. The worst part of my management training wasn’t the diversity training or the company indoctrination...it was when they stuck that straw in my ear and sucked half my brains out.
     
  19. Swampertech

    Swampertech TDPRI Member

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    And the kid was Hartley!
     
  20. GreatDaneRock

    GreatDaneRock Tele-Holic

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    They: Who plays peaveys?

    Me: Yes.
    20181110_105009.jpg IMG_20190731_174252080.jpg 20181120_084013-1.jpg
     
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