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The future of Peavey

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by jayroc1, Feb 17, 2021.

  1. Retired Schmuck

    Retired Schmuck TDPRI Member

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    Last time I bought Peavey 1976. They are done. COVID just buries any resurrection. Their Transtube was an ad slogan, not an actual development. Their 5150 was a lost opportunity. I will check out the undercover boss fiasco.
     
  2. zhiguli8

    zhiguli8 TDPRI Member

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    I know these are smaller companies compared to Peavey, but why is it that Godin and Traynor, two Canadian companies, can keep it going and still have relatively affordable products mostly made in Canada?
     
  3. Marc Morfei

    Marc Morfei Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I have owned a number of Peavey amps and other products, and liked them all. Good products, fair prices, (formerly) American made. For some reason I happen to not have any now, so I guess that means I found things I like better. I posted last year about seeing someone on Austin City Limits using a Peavey amp, and I remarked how rare it was to see that.

    There were earlier posts about the wisdom of cutting out the retails middle-man and selling direct, or something like that. Maybe that would work. But I always thought they had the opposite problem: poor presence in retail stores. The past few years has Guitar Center even stocked Peavey? I don't recall seeing any. If the average customer doesn't see your product in stores, it's out-of-sight out-of-mind. My local GC is almost all Fender amps, with a few Vox, Orange, and Marshall.
     
  4. brown2bob

    brown2bob TDPRI Member

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    My first amp was a Peavey Deuce... somewhat of a beast with 4-6L6 tubes. Definitely nailed that Lynyrd Skynyrd type sound while killing my ears with decibels. I ended up putting the amp chassis into a separate head enclosure to minimize tube rattle. Played many gigs with that amp... many fond memories. Also had a "Transtube" Express 112. This was my follow-on amp after the Deuce went up in smoke. I recall the Express had a little less output power compared to the Bandit but did well just popping a mic in front for larger venues. Sad to see the company evolve into "just another low cost labor" enterprise while shafting the American workers.
     
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  5. qpond

    qpond TDPRI Member

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    My first amp was a deuce vt in 1980, still have it, but it is a beast, and in all that time I've only had one gig big enough to drive the power amp hard enough for sweet Skynyrd tones (all 120 watts of it!), seems to have a habit of blowing internal fuses if not soldered in. Now use a classic 20 every day, these were mocked in the UK for years and now suddenly they appear to have value, the boost button is useless. Many of those old ss peaveys, even the cheap ones, had a good accutronics spring reverb. I'd love a 70's backstage 30. Fender made bad amps too, eg my champ12.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2021
  6. SDFD18

    SDFD18 TDPRI Member

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    No. I do NOT think Peavey (or any other manufacturing business) will return to the United States for production.

    The labor in the United States is more expensive and the distribution is more expensive. Everything goes through China. They are going to pass the U.S. in GDP within the next 10 years. So regardless of where the guitars are made, it will always be cheaper to manufacture outside the U.S. and with really no discernible differences.

    People are posting that there are “many reasons” why companies move offshore. Fact is, only two reasons matter. Cost of labor and cost of distribution. (Global distribution)

    Made in the United States only matters to small minded thinkers. They allow national pride to interfere with objective evaluation. I have two G&L’s. One is a thinline with a neck humbucker. Custom ordered and made. Great workmanship. The guitar sounds great. Not long after I bought it, they started offering the humbucker in the neck as an option and finally as it’s own model. The other is a solid body, natural ash ASAT. Made in Indonesia. Guitar is heavy as hell, but sounds and plays beautifully. Are there any notable distinctions between the two? Yes. The distinctions are not from worker/laborer effects, but from design and equipment effects.

    Bottom line is this............

    We are buying and playing component guitars. Solid body, bolt together guitars. You can take the entire guitar apart with three screw drivers. How hard is that to assemble? A sanding machine doesn’t know your national origin, gender, ethnicity etc. Anyone can run a guitar body and neck across a sanding belt. Anyone can develop the skill of sanding and prepping the guitar for finishing. Why would Peavey think they need to return to the United States for equal but far more expensive labor/distribution? They won’t! Manufacturing just moves from China to Indonesia, to Vietnam, to (insert country name here).

    The U.S. top three areas of GDP are 1. Finance 2. Insurance 3. Real estate

    We don’t make anything in this country. We develop ideas and ship the labor off for production. Largest export of Costa Rica? Silicone computer chips!!!

    Peavey is NEVER coming back!
     
  7. sidestyle

    sidestyle TDPRI Member

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    Where it’s made doesn’t really matter. You can get custom shop-level quality from anywhere if you’re willing to pay for it. The skills necessary for a quality product don’t just exist in Americans lol. You just need to evaluate each product on its own merits, not compared to something else.
     
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  8. RoyalBaby

    RoyalBaby Tele-Afflicted

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    My point of reference here is probably Laney who have moved all manufacture to the Far East but have a small sub line in UK built products as Black Country Customs. Although as this range includes digital pedals whose innards almost certainly come from the Far East I don't know how valid that claim to be British built can be. However, like Peavey with Budda or some of their other brands I guess there will continue to be a market of people who will pay for a more premium product and expect point of origin to be a part of that premium. Other people happy with a non premium product but still wanting a recognisable name on the box.
     
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  9. Tim Hicks

    Tim Hicks TDPRI Member

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    Peavey made its reputation by producing robust serviceable products that were good value and it did this by adopting efficient productione methods, such as the ealy adoption of CNC milling technology on the T60 guitars. The danger in the last couple of decades is that its reputation for solid build quality has suffered somewhat and if it loses that reputation it becomes and "also ran" horse in a race with a lot of other horses.

    I have a US made Peavey 4x10 Classic combo from the early 1970s that had led several hard lives even before I acquired it recently. It has probably never been serviced and even the tired looking tubes were old GE 6L6's. Apart from one slight wrinkle in a speaker cone it was all running fine and still is. It will probably outlast most of the later design Peavey Classics made in China in the last 10 years. I have a little Peavey Valve King Royal 8 and lets just say it is not quite the same build quality.... To be fair the Royal 8 was a lot cheaper so nobody can expect it to be the same build quality as the US product of the 1970s. The point is that the sweet spot that Peavey hit originally was a great combination of solid build quality at a competitive price.

    This is not meant to be a simplistic criticism of Chinese made products as China can manufacture to high standards if required but it is difficult for a business like Peavey to control the quality of the product, and every component that goes into it from a complex supply chain when subcontracting is endemic in that supply chain. Other major brands have had quality problems and Epiphone is a good example of how it has taken them much of the last 20 years to exert proper control of the quality products being built in its own factories the other side of the world in a country with different languages, customs and business practices. Without that control over quality, the company is vulnerable to issues caused by some minor sub-contractor that it has never even heard of.
     
  10. soundchaser59

    soundchaser59 Tele-Afflicted

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    Why? I mean, it won't have anything to do with "Peavey" when you are finished. You basically got it for the cab and the chassis to use as your platform to build from scratch, right?
     
  11. Lovemydogcharlie

    Lovemydogcharlie NEW MEMBER!

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    I LOVED my peavey classic 30, but gave up on it due to the hiss. Did you have that problem and how did you solve it (noise gate??). Do you know how anyone else solved it being a pretty “hissy “ amp? Thanks.
     
  12. jwp333

    jwp333 Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

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    It would take a lot smarter businessman than me or Hartley to figure out how to get Peavey back to its American made hay day. I bought my first Peavey amp in 1980. Those were the days when they put out the Monitor magazine for dealers to distribute. You got to see all the inner workings at the factory and new research and development. And you got to see pictures of a weird-looking Hartley in bell bottom pants and his sweet wife Melia. I thought it was cool as hell.
     
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  13. turfdoc

    turfdoc Tele-Meister

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    My Peavey Classic 30 (vintage early 90's) has always been a1st grade amp, and is the little sister to my Marshall JCM800 4211. I've had more issues with the Marshall than I ever have with my Peavey(in fact, none with my Peavey)
     
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  14. turfdoc

    turfdoc Tele-Meister

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    Oh well, all I know is a I played my Classic 30 (vintage early 90's) both gigging abroad and here in the states, and it always delivered.
     
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  15. Guitardvark

    Guitardvark Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

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    They wont come back bec hartley done made his fortune and his heirs got theirs too.

    These things are most left to the next generation.

    I dont see peavey being a next generation family owned company like Martin remained for 150 years for example.

    I dont see anyone with any purpose to resurrect them.

    I could have jus said NO
     
  16. Gjguitarmn

    Gjguitarmn TDPRI Member

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    I'm afraid it has come and gone. Watch the episode of the TV show "Undercover Bosses" that features Peavey Electronics and you'll get an accurate picture of Peavey's issues. Very unfortunate.
     
  17. ampsplus

    ampsplus TDPRI Member

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    70s and 80s Peavey were great products; I know because I am an amp tech and have repaired and cleaned up many of these older Peavey amps. Some items I have had in the the late 70s and 80s are in for cleaning after 40 years of being used. Compared to how Fender went down in the 70s, Peavey was a strong contender. And they had the country market sewn up. I believe is more BECAUSE they went offshore to keep the costs down that they are floundering. If they returned to USA manufacture, and trimmed the line way down, AND revived some of the older designs, they would do ok.
     
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  18. telemaster03

    telemaster03 Tele-Meister

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    Peavey built a lot of it’s reputation early on by it’s connection to steel guitar players and it had all the known players in it’s roster. That market segment has all but gone as the instrument’s popularity has dwindled. The steel guitar community is now largely being serviced by Quilter and Telonics, and Little Walter on the higher end.

    I will say this about Peavey - I had a Classic Chorus 212 that I used for over a decade that nailed the 90’s country tone to a ‘T’ and I never gave it a second thought regarding reliability. I beat the crap outta that amp. I don’t care about pots, caps, wires, speakers or Hartley Peavey, that amp kicked serious butt. I’m on the lookout for a couple Special 130’s to use for steel...reliability would not be a concern with Peavey, even for a 25 or 30 year old amp.
     
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  19. blatzer

    blatzer TDPRI Member

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    dont forget the cs 800 boat anchor!!!!! i'm still using a cs 200 with an alembic preamp for bass and sometimes in my studio pa system pounds/power/price = unbeatable!
     
  20. gitlvr

    gitlvr Friend of Leo's

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    I have the modern Bandit. It's still a great amp, but I find it's tone slightly thinner than the older USA models. Still sounds great with pedals.
    Mine will live in my music room as I no longer gig, but it should last me til I'm dead.
    Here is a video I did on mine.
    I have been a gigging musician for 30-35 years, and Peavey gear has been with me in one form or another through it all.
     
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