The Classics vs Modern Day Boutique

Discussion in 'The Stomp Box' started by beexter, Jun 5, 2014.

  1. JoeNeri

    JoeNeri Friend of Leo's

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    Amen!
     
  2. Slickster

    Slickster Tele-Holic

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    I agree with above... it's the volume ... those "great" sounds can be had the old school way. crank that amp.

    Pedals give us a chance to get that sound at a reasonable volume
     
  3. 11 Gauge

    11 Gauge Doctor of Teleocity

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    I love pedals, but if it really comes down to cranking the amp, I think possibly the best alternative is to explore either a proper iso cab, or some reasonable workaround of it. Even folks who play(ed) super loud might be forced to do this - some kind of barrier or amp facing a specific way - still insanely loud, but at least not at the consequence of the audience's hearing near the stage.

    Iso cabs need not be huge, and many (most?) already have the mic set up, so it could make setup not so bad. I'm sure there's a learning curve.

    I just think that pedals should be embraced for whatever difference they might bring. I think attenuators are similar, and adding power scaling can really be expensive. IMO, all are sort of an aspartame/saccharine/etc. sort of thing, even if it's all in our heads.

    I'd have to think that some percentage of rig experimenters might be using a 2 cab setup - one being trad/lower volume (single 12 or similar), 'baffled down' or something, and the other some sort of iso cab or improvised variation of it.

    It can obviously be as impractical as any other variation though. Really becomes a subjective thing, and how much trouble/time someone is willing to go thru.

    ...Pritchard amps use some type of cab that promotes specific air movement with targeted resonant frequencies - I think 'more work along those lines' needs to be experimented with. Problem is it's 'the opposite of vintage/nostalgic' in its approach, so some folks will simply turn away by default.
     
  4. wildschwein

    wildschwein Tele-Afflicted

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    A lot of classic sounds were also recorded with small amps in the studio -- it wasn't always blistering volume. Steve Cropper, Jimmy Page, Ace Frehely, Jeff Beck, Frank Zappa and Eric Clapton are all guys who cranked up little amps like Pignoses, Havards and Champs etc.
     
  5. 11 Gauge

    11 Gauge Doctor of Teleocity

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    Actually - Frank is a GREAT example of the use of effects in this instance, and there's a video where Dweezil shows how it worked, by A/B'ing a stock SG vs. Baby Snakes.

    ...Along with having guitars fitted with Green Ringers and parametric EQs, Zappa also had boosters built in. He had a very unique way of picking, and used super light gauge strings. The booster made everything sound 'explosively alive,' and really was an essential part of Frank's sound. AND - he could get that sound thru a SS Pignose, or even by combo'ing SS Acoustic amps with the tube stuff.

    Zappa blows my mind - there are tracks where a Les Paul sounds like it's got single coils in it, or one of his Strats was really fattened up, or a mix of both.

    ...He's also a good example of someone who really knew how to get the most out of gear - he mastered everything of a technological nature. "Being ignorant of how sausage is made" was never something he would be content with. Thank goodness.
     
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