The Buttercaster Project

Buckocaster51

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Even when you take out the 1/8" bit used for the string holes and replace it with a 5steenths bit for the ferrules...it is STILL LINED UP WITH THE REGISTRATION PIN!

Makes it a snap to pretty much get the ferrules in the right place.

drillingforferrules.500.jpg


the one that looks a bit out of place is just sitting high. It will be just fine with a tap of a hammer.

finishedferrules500.jpg


As I look back on the day's work, it has struck me that I still have to drill a hole. Anybody else catch what I missed?

Now it is time for some pizza.
 

Buckocaster51

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jwells393 said:
FYI to the readers.

Last time I was at Lowes they had a Delta 12 bench top drill press for $179.

Sounds good...but haven't you noticed that I don't like to pay more than $99 for anything?

:rolleyes:

Fuzzy, it will be a couple of weeks at least before I can get any color on either of these. I still haven't decided on which of the yellows to use. The paler of the two is more in line with the Pastelcaster them I seem to have gotten myself started on.

Thanks for the input and advice guys. I appreciate it.
 

Bones

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Looking good Buck.

have you always been a patient man? Just curious if you had to learn to take your time with this or if it came naturally?

I'm teaching myself refinishing a Squier "51" and man it's killing me that the weather wont cooperate and the days when i can spray are few and far between.
 

Buckocaster51

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Justin Crouse said:
do you finish with the ferrules in?

Not me. I don't know what others do but I will pop those out before I get serious about the finish.
 

Buckocaster51

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Bones said:
have you always been a patient man?

That has to be the line of the day!

Lethargic? Yes.

Patient? Never.

There is a difference.

These things take me forever because EVERYTHING I do takes forever.

;)

Besides, you ALWAYS have to measure twice and cut once.
 

Justin Crouse

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Buckocaster51 said:
Not me. I don't know what others do but I will pop those out before I get serious about the finish.


thanks buck.

any tips on popping them back out, or are they not that tight to begin with?


thanks for this thread too btw.

JC
 

sean79

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If anybody knows a better way to sand inside the horn, I am all ears. To me that is almost the hardest part of the entire project. Just not enough room in there. I'm glad I didn't decide to put together F-5 mandolins...
If you have access to a spindle sander, that might be the ticket. Depending on the size if the sanding drum you attach, you should be able to get into some pretty tight curves - or big ones as needed. The thing spins and goes up and down - wish I had one when I built the body for my mahoganycaster.

Good luck. And keep posting with your progress; things are looking great.

Sean
 

Jack Wells

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Speaking of spindle sanders ................. I'm finding this RIDGID Oscillating Edge/Belt Spindle Sander to be one of the most useful tools in my shop. However it does cost more than $99.

..............................
165531_4.jpg
 

reddogbass

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A spindle sander would be just the ticket. One of these days I'm gonna pop for one. The cheaper ones don't really have a big enough table so it's gonna take several hundred $. In the meantime I'll keep using a drum set-up I made to go in the drill press, similar to the Robo-Sander from Stew-Mac. Problem is it doesn't oscillate so the wear on the sanding drum is in one spot, until you move the table, or the spindle. I can't talk anyone into standing thee and "oscillate" the spindle. They think I'm nuts. I'd post some pics, but my old digital just doesn't cut it.

I like that belt Rigid sander. What I've done for the same effect, and to use the whole width of the belt, is to mount a belt sander at an angle to the table, so the the work-piece is sanded across the enitre width of the belt. Sure saves on belts.

Nice job Bucko'. About that paint job... Yellow is one of the poorest hiding colors. You can get some really different shades by experimenting with different color base-primer coats. Fun ain't it?
 

Buckocaster51

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Good idea about the spindle sander. I might have to make nice with the HS shop teacher - take him a new computer or something - I see Grizzly has one for $130 or so, but that is above my limit...

Today I ordered way too much from Stew-Mac and some Keystone pickups. The necks are on the way. Things are falling together.

Also went out and drilled this hole that I forgot yesterday.

bridgepickupwirehole.jpg


It would be a little hard to wire up without it. The putty knife is there to protect the surface from the drill bit.

Thanks again for all of the good ideas and warm fuzzies.

Project will be on hold until binding supplies get here...and with 3 band jobs and a football game next weekend I doubt that I'll get much done on these.

But it does keep me out of the bars...

;)
 

kyle1167

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Band saw questions

Hey Buck,

Great tutorial. That $99.00 band saw you use, is it the 9" shopmaster. If so what do you think of it? Any problems cutting bodies with it?

I've been considering getting one but I was told that it probably wouldn't be deep enough and would have to flip the body face down to cut the cut out.

I've also been looking at the Craftman 10" bench top saw. I'm limited on money and space(my wife is convinced the garage is for the car:rolleyes: )
So I have a corner of the garage with two work benches in an L shape.

I would eventually like to cut strat bodies also. So would I be able to do that with a 9" or 10" band saw? :confused:

I really don't want to spend more than $200.00 on a saw so if anyone knows of a 14" for around that, I may consider it.

BTW buck, what area of Iowa are you in. I live just north of Cedar Rapids.
 

Rob DiStefano

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IMO, it doesn't much matter how you trim away the excess wood from the body blank because it's the the router w/top bearing bit, and the guitar outline router template, that does the real work.
 

kyle1167

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Rob DiStefano said:
IMO, it doesn't much matter how you trim away the excess wood from the body blank because it's the the router w/top bearing bit, and the guitar outline router template, that does the real work.


So I could actually use a hand held jig saw to cut the rough shape then use the router and template?

If so, I'm a helluva alot closer to starting this than I thought:D
 

Ronkirn

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So I could actually use a hand held jig saw to cut the rough shape then use the router and template?

Yepperz..... Use a drill and spade bit, Jig Saw, Skill saw, whatever it takes to remove the excess lumber.

When you get to the template and routing, just remember to take small "bites" and hold the router tightly. Do not go out and buy a 2inch long bit and try to do the entire depth in one pass....specially with a hand held router.

Take a piece of 3/4 Ply wood, Particle board, whatever, drill a 1 1/2 inch hole in it, and mount the Router base upside down on the bottom. Insert the Router and clamp the ply wood to a work bench edge and you have a makeshift router table, which will make doing the body easier.

Ron Kirn
 




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