The "Blues Album" to learn every lick from ?

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by brogh, Apr 24, 2020.

  1. screamin eagle

    screamin eagle Poster Extraordinaire

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    Wow, no love for Lockwood? @ndcaster at least mentioned Bill Jennings.
    This album has basically every modern Lockwood idea. No, you won’t find his harp comping on it, but you will find just about everything that paid his bills for 30 years.

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    I’d have a hard time not choosing this album:
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  2. keng

    keng TDPRI Member

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  3. Hedgerow

    Hedgerow TDPRI Member

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    Yes!!! Great album! Now I am going to drag mine out and give it a listen. I always thought it was cool that almost exactly the first half of the album features blues harp, then the second half turns into a guitar showcase.

    My suggestion is “The London Howlin' Wolf Sessions.” But there are so many.
     
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  4. oldunc

    oldunc Tele-Holic

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    You could do worse than to try to imitate Jimmy Johnson's lyricism, and forget about memorizing licks. "Johnson's Whacks" would probably be the most obvious starting point. If you just want to memorize clichés, Roy Buchanon gets in as many as anyone.
     
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  5. Johnnyjbj

    Johnnyjbj TDPRI Member

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    Eric Clapton- From the Cradle

    Freddie King - Texas Cannonball
     
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  6. bblumentritt

    bblumentritt Friend of Leo's

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    It's like a guitar clinic on a live album.

    The opening number (Rellin' n Rockin') is a lesson on playing blues rhythm guitar.
    The next song (Hot Cha) is a lesson on building up from verse 1, to verse 2, and then peaking on verse 3 before pulling things back down to wrap it up.
    The solo on Roy's Blues is how to bring the house down with one note.

    And it just keeps getting better.[​IMG]


    This one from 1965 is a collection of blues standards. The blues licks (on a Tele of course) form a library. How good was Robbie Robertson in the early 1960s? He and the Hawks recorded blues before the Bluesbreakers, before Clapton, before the Stones, etc.
    Michael Bloomfield also played on this album… piano.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. crgrissom

    crgrissom TDPRI Member

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    Yes, me too. Still learning from this. And as much as I love the Derek/Warren years, as as much as Derek and Warren are freakin’ virtuosos, this album holds up very well against the later ones.
     
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  8. vid1900

    vid1900 Tele-Meister

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    LOL, That ain't the blues.
     
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  9. dimenjj

    dimenjj Tele-Meister

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    Three (3) albums that I feel will give you a great blues education. If you can learn off these three albums, you've accomplished a lot.

    51KKNkD4tgL.jpg

    BornUnderABadSign.jpg

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  10. jvin248

    jvin248 Doctor of Teleocity

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    from the post previously, cool looking guitar. Probably Teisco? Kay? Sears?

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. Jay Jernigan

    Jay Jernigan Tele-Afflicted

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    Muddy Waters, "Fathers and Sons." It featured Mike Bloomfield in his prime along with, for the most part, muddy's regular band. Not so much a lesson in Guitar Licks as a study in how the blues is played.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2020
  12. emjayjay

    emjayjay Tele-Meister

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    have seen your videos recommended to me on YouTube, but haven’t watched any yet. Will watch this One later - it’s constantly recommended to me!
     
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  13. Big Lug

    Big Lug Tele-Holic

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    Still in awe after all these years...

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  14. Silent Otto

    Silent Otto Tele-Holic

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    Incendiary
     
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  15. Lance Morgan

    Lance Morgan Tele-Meister

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    Clapton Blues.
     
  16. umasstele

    umasstele Tele-Afflicted

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    Live at Bill Graham's Fillmore West- Mike Bloomfield and Friends
     
  17. Charlie Bernstein

    Charlie Bernstein Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm not a music teacher. But I've heard some teachers say that note-by-note is not the way to learn the blues. It's fine to play along with recordings, but reacting to riffs is more educational than parroting them.

    I also don't recommend starting with white artists — not because they're bad (some are great), but because they learned by glueing their ears to the black artists who wrote the book. If you could ask Clapton or Bishop or Vaughn or Bloomfield or Winter whom to listen to, they'd point to people like Hooker and Waters and Wolf and and Sumlin and James and the three Kings.
     
  18. slauson slim

    slauson slim Friend of Leo's Platinum Supporter

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    bblumentritt: Agree as to Robertson on those John Hammond records. His playing is slashing, mean and concise. Great stuff.
     
  19. Fiesta Red

    Fiesta Red Poster Extraordinaire

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    These were the first two albums I thought of—“Hard Again” and “The Fabulous Thunderbirds” (it wasn’t supposed to be called “Girls Go Wild”, but it (understandably) got called that because of the album cover.

    BUT TO BE HONEST:

    The last four years or so, I’ve played fewer and fewer solos. I’ve concentrated on riffs and grooves, in the school of Lightnin’ Hopkins, Slim Harpo, Tony Joe White and Ray Wylie Hubbard. I’ve found that creating a groove and riding it for a song or two is very satisfying—and can be done as a solo thing or with a full band.
     
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  20. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I think for getting into blues, if you aren't advanced, Clapton's "From the Cradle" would be great for a bunch of "traditional, but electric" Blues.
    1. "Blues Before Sunrise" (Leroy Carr) – 2:58 ; this version is inspired also by Elmore James's rendition of the song
    2. "Third Degree" (Eddie Boyd, Willie Dixon) – 5:07
    3. "Reconsider Baby" (Lowell Fulson) – 3:20
    4. "Hoochie Coochie Man" (Dixon) – 3:16 ; originally performed by Muddy Waters
    5. "Five Long Years" (Boyd) – 4:47
    6. "I'm Tore Down" (Sonny Thompson) – 3:02 ; originally performed by Freddie King
    7. "How Long Blues" (Carr) – 3:09
    8. "Goin' Away Baby" (James A. Lane) – 4:00
    9. "Blues Leave Me Alone" (Lane) – 3:36
    10. "Sinner's Prayer" (Lloyd Glenn, Fulson)[11] – 3:20
    11. "Motherless Child" (Robert Hicks)[citation needed] – 2:57
    12. "It Hurts Me Too" (Tampa Red) – 3:17
    13. "Someday After a While" (Freddy King, Thompson) – 4:27
    14. "Standin' Round Crying" (McKinley Morganfield) – 3:39
    15. "Driftin'" (Charles Brown, Johnny Moore, Eddie Williams) (Johnny Moore's Three Blazers) – 3:10
    16. "Groaning the Blues" (Dixon) – 6:05 ; originally performed by Otis Rush
     
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