the beatles are not the best

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by fuzzbender, Mar 1, 2014.

  1. chabby

    chabby Friend of Leo's

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    Heck, Lennon would have been playing an affinity or Squier-LOL
    Their instruments weren't even top o the heap when they were playing.
    Hofner? I thought they'd misspelled Hohner, the Harmonica people (and more). Rickenbacker? hate them, love Lennon playing his though. Even George opted for the Gretsch, which was the best of the lot, but still not as good as a Gibson. They didn't even talk about guitars like we do now. It's like the Wine Culture, cork sniffers on every block now, no longer only available to the connossieur - welcome to mass marketing, or what I like to call SUYA Marketing. The market controls us, the gov and richest control money power and "The Market". How many banks are we down to?

    Got off track there but what I was getting at was, I'd never even actually seen, or heard the beatles speak except on vinyl or Radio. We didn't know what color of undies the musicians wore back then, it was just how good are they? Can they sing and play, write etc? Now all the focus is on visual art, so the music takes a back seat. Its like when any art gets polluted. The more polluted it gets, things that used to matter, don't. Art is pop culture, the Beatles are and were Pop Culture, but it was so much less accessible back then, it held higher value. I wish the corp feeding and MFG'ing of art was further in the background, but then not only would we no longer produce anything of substance in the States, we'd be replaced by robots. Right now we are just this giant hole for China to feed. Babylon? Are we too apathetic and fat to care? No, it's just change and change is all that can be counted on. But the Golden Rule is still firmly in place, for now.
     
  2. chabby

    chabby Friend of Leo's

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    That was it - totally! I used to just lay by that big old RCA hi-fi that looked like nice piece of furniture and spin Beatles and nothing else mattered.
    If you needed a fix, you could always turn on the Radio and get the top 40.
    It was a magical time, I remember every performance of the Beats on Ed Sullivan we watched and waited for whenever it was announced. School may as well have been shut down that day because all that was being discussed was the mop-tops and The Ed Sully Show. Even the final Taped thing where they did Hey Jude and Revolution was just as magical. You almost felt like family, or they were part of your family. I remember night skiing to Abbey Road for 5, 6th and even 7th grade. It was something to have lived through, that nobody today could relate to. It's like the blank stare when you talk about how as a kid you just roamed about freely, totally at will, disconnected in ever possible way from ma and Pa until you got home to feed rover. Who you'd just open the door for and say "See Ya" - Funny stuff.

    Same could be said of the Muhammad Ali v Frazier, Foreman, Norton, Spinx and whomever. It was all that mattered to the Nation that day. We still had heroes, watched Westerns more than anything else and a toy gun was in every kid's hand.

    The freedoms we had, the anonymity is just not part of life today, yet we believe, or tell ourselves we still are.........
     
  3. fuzzbender

    fuzzbender Former Member

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    perfectly said chabby

    the beatles did well and art should have progressed

    only it seems to have merely been the moment when marketing took over
     
  4. Drubbing

    Drubbing Friend of Leo's

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    Mostly nostalgia dude - remembering things as they really weren't. You might have been watching Ali, doesn't mean it consumed a nation. Westerns were the genre of the 50s and 60s, much like the big dumb action film or rom com is today. Looking at many of them now, some will make people cringe with their racism. The Searchers broke the mould by portraying the hero as a genocidal vigilante.
     
  5. fuzzbender

    fuzzbender Former Member

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    to paraphrase a wise man on advertizing, nostalgia is only half right, we just don't know which half, and getting things half right at least leaves us some room for manoeuvre
     
  6. Sbax

    Sbax TDPRI Member

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    What? You've lost your Beatle lps, CDs, or tapes? Did you expect the band to continue through out your lifetime for your benefit and enjoyment?

    Yes. The best time culturally in the history of the world was during your youth. Sure. Mr Lucky, i must read more of your posts because they are so stupid it's the best stupidity of all time...culturally speaking, of course.
     
  7. simonsp

    simonsp Friend of Leo's

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    In terms of social impact no-one has come close to the effect the Beatles had. Other bands and labels, most notably Motown, can lay claim to having a catalog of tunes to match the fab four, but none of them ever had the cathartic social slam that the Beatles delivered between 62 and 68.

    Britain in 1962 was still living in a post WW2 mentality of 'know your place'. John saying "those in the balcony, just rattle your jewels" was huge. How it all panned out in the long run is another matter and can't be laid at their door, but it was the Beatles that lit the blue touch paper. Not the Stones, certainly not Led Zep (who inspired a generation to sit slumped cross legged and drop another mandrax). Compare them to the Beatles singing "I'd love to turn you on" and introducing society at large to the suprising effects of lsd.

    I've loved the Beatles since I was five years old, laying in bed pretending to be playing in the band. It was the band, as a coherent unit I loved, the individuals who comprised it I can take or leave, they're only human after all.

    The OP seemed to be asking why have they not been usurped by 'the new Beatles'. One answer could be that no-one else has created a consistent body of work that has struck a chord with the wider public. But it's also simply that times have changed, methods of delivery of music have changed. Whereas in the 60's the family sat around the only TV in the house and received the message together with their mums and dads,who would inevitably be complaining about the length of their hair, their dress, sneering at the lyrics etc. and thus unwittingly turning the Beatles into heroes in the eyes of their kids.

    Can there ever be a band or musical movement to challenge the Beatles? Sure there can, but I don't go looking for it in groups of musicians based around guitar/bass and drums. And I'm pretty certain it won't come from out of the tv or radio. Mass acapella singing groups perhaps? Why not.
     
  8. Chooglin59

    Chooglin59 Tele-Meister

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    I never cared that much for them but I appreciate the talent
     
  9. EddieLocrian

    EddieLocrian Tele-Afflicted

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    I think its all time related.

    I think a lot of bands from yesteryear just wouldn't even get signed to a label these days --> if they presented their original songs now.
    I mean if you had never heard the Who for example and a young puppy who was listening to JZ or Bieber or whatever flicked radio stations for a second, theres no way they would even like the sound of it, let along the songs. I think they would pull their hoodies up over their ears, tuck into the KFC and drag their pants dangerously low to the ground in protest.

    I mean if we had never heard Mozart before I don't think any A&R chap would say:
    "hum that could storm the charts and make me some $."

    The great rock'n'roll swindle is as alive as it ever was.
     
  10. Drubbing

    Drubbing Friend of Leo's

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    I think too many attribute cause and effect to the Beatles. They probably benefitted more than most from the vibe of the 60s. Yes they nudged things along, but they followed what was happening and provided their own soundtrack. Doesn't mean they created all of it. The way the fanatics go on, it makes it sound like they did.

    Lots of bands followed or created a zeitgeist in music and every generation creates its own cultural story. But only the 60s benefitted form the largest cohort of teens the world has known, and that more than anything else, is what drives the nostalgia that the 60s was where everything was at. And for many, where it also stopped.

    Teen culture has still taken over, only it couldn't care less about politics and war, and doesn't get drafted anymore. Now it's just a market segment for music labels to flog things to.
     
  11. Spontaneous

    Spontaneous Tele-Meister

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    "We're just a band, that made it very very big, that's all." - John Lennon
     
  12. Drubbing

    Drubbing Friend of Leo's

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    Very much like Dylan; he has spent decades denying many things attributed to him by his own fanatics, said many times he was just a songwriter and poet, and people foisted stuff onto him he wasn't interested in, or recognised as him, or his. It was thrown baggage. This is long after he considered himself a 'protest' singer, which was a short-lived and early part of his career.

    Fanatics won't have a bar of it, and claim he's being evasive and disingenous. They want their nostalgia, dammit.
     
  13. rokdog49

    rokdog49 Friend of Leo's

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    You're wrong John, it's the music you made.
     
  14. src9000

    src9000 Poster Extraordinaire

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    What we lost was radio. And it wasn't video who killed it.

    That and the large communities of young folk who want to make music and express themselves.
     
  15. Telemarkman

    Telemarkman Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Yeah, in the end it's about the music. At the time it was also about the hairstyle, suits, looks, the whole package.
     
  16. SkinGraph

    SkinGraph TDPRI Member

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  17. prebend

    prebend Tele-Holic

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    It was the most successful case ever of creating an enormous mountain out of an ok mole hill. The time was right; global media was in it's infancy, rock and roll was already established in the mainstream and the powers that be, across the entire spectrum, decided they were going to create something bigger than anything before it.

    So along came these four guys with suits, skinny ties, mop top haircuts, cute accents, funny quips, a few good original songs and a truck load of covers of American rock and roll. And we took to it like ducks to water. Ate it up like cotton candy, which it was. It's still tried all the time, but it's been done so it's harder to create and maintain the frenzy. And there is much more competition today for exposure. It's always about money, and it was in the case of the Beatles. A lot of people got rich, a pyramid scheme of sorts.

    As to their staying power, I can't explain that. They have some good songs, but a lot are pure drivel. More suitable for a Broadway Musical; certainly not rock and roll. But they had talent, just not any more than a lot of other artists. And no, I can't imagine we'll ever see anything like it again in music, but who knows.

    Do I sound skeptical?
     
  18. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    It probably didn't hurt at all that their first appearance on Ed Sullivan came only a few months after the Kennedy assassination. The mood of the times was more likely than not part of the equation.
     
  19. raito

    raito Poster Extraordinaire

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    prebend,

    While what you say is true, you don't account for the forward motion in their music. Just look at the difference between say, Please Please Me and Revolver (I'm not going to go all the way to Sgt. Pepper). And that's in 3 years.

    Sure, there's a lot of clunkers in their catalogue. But once they were on top, the movement of their style is what propelled the music of the time along. And that's where the influence comes from. Nobody's gong to say their cover of Mr. Postman was all that influential, even though it's pretty good.
     
  20. oldgofaster

    oldgofaster Tele-Meister

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    'few good and some good songs'...lol..."drivel" still sounds good after 50 years...lol

    'Mood of the times'? Hype? Fanatics overblowing and overstating?

    Explain away dudes....

    No, it couldn't be talent or skill or ability or a gift or hard work....
     
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