The Album Is in Deep Trouble – and the Music Business Probably Can’t Save it

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by blowtorch, Nov 10, 2018.

  1. RetroTeleRod

    RetroTeleRod Poster Extraordinaire

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    The FM soundtrack was my very 1st.
    I'm glad I didn't miss out.
    Albums.jpg
     
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  2. teleman1

    teleman1 Tele-Afflicted

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    If you ever watched my posts at the TGP, I have been saying Rock is dead, for a long time. IT was like a Gold mine;eventually stripped. Then, they found even more ways to extract the Gold, till there was just flecks. What we have now are just the remaining flecks. I think being raised with the internet gives so many avenues of some type of entertainment, and with the exhaustion of rocknroll, music has taken a huge turn in value to the human being. Album concepts will continue to wane.
     
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  3. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Rock n' roll has been dead since around 1962. Rock music, on the other hand, since sometime around the early nineties
     
  4. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    More importantly, @blowtorch, how are you posting at 7am after rocking-out like this into the wee hours in another city. Rock and roll is not dead, it seems.

    C7A2F451-98A0-4E84-95B3-098F4D7CC3FC.jpeg

    Cool songs, btw.
     
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  5. cyclopean

    cyclopean Friend of Leo's

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    i don't see any evidence of rock dying.
     
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  6. memorex

    memorex Friend of Leo's

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    My opinion is that what killed the music industry was high speed internet and the ability to download anything, legal or otherwise. Because even considering legal downloads, the industry doesn't make as much per song as they did on the plastic discs.
     
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  7. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Landslide, rocks are falling,
    Falling down 'round our very heads,
    We tried but you were yawning,
    Look again, rock is dead, rock is dead, rock is dead.
     
  8. beyer160

    beyer160 Friend of Leo's

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    It depends on your perspective.

    I was talking about the perspective of large corporations who sell recorded music- for them, rock music has been a "legacy product" for over a decade- the profits are all in newer forms of music.

    From a listener/performer perspective, rock music is as alive as it's ever been- in fact, it's probably healthier now than it was a decade ago when the corporate greedheads were ****ing everything up in order to squeeze every last dime out of their artists. Now that the dimes are gone, the bands can do whatever they want.
     
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  9. bftfender

    bftfender Friend of Leo's

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    yup and that lack of investment in time and creating an on demand disposable world from products to relationships is making the mess we al now live in. So glad my dan and grandfathers taught me how to work and make things and app
    thanks for the album covers,going to pull the Aja shirt off the wall and wear it, feeling pretty retro and my age and i 98 lp.jpg like it !!
     
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  10. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Not really an opinion on this topic, but a sidenote I think is worth noting:

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but recording artists have never made as much on sales of their music (singles, LP's, Cd's, downloads, whatever) as they have on sales of tickets to shows, and other merchandise/licensing (of their music, image, name etc.). There are exceptions, but I think this is a general truth.

    That being said, it would seem the "death" of anything (the album, "rock and roll", etc.) is more industry-relevant than art-relevant. This is to say, major labels sell less albums and will probably put less albums out, but that doesn't mean there aren't a lot of artists making albums (regardless of where/how these are recorded/released). Likewise, there may be less rock and roll (or rock, or whatever says what you mean) on the radio, on TV, the zeitgeist, whatever, but there is still rock and roll "out there".

    All this is just to say that what's relevant to the industry (and what they produce, invest in, promote, etc.) has no necessary significant bearing on what's being created. The main effect on the everyday music fan may be that we're less likely to hear about some particular artist or type of music "by accident" (that is, we're less likely to randomly hear it on the radio one day and think "Oh man, what's that? I need to hear more of that!"); we'll have to search more in order to find, should we care to find. But aside from that, what makes an industry money and what we want to listen to/what's out there to find are not one and the same.
     
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  11. El Tele Lobo

    El Tele Lobo Friend of Leo's

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    It’s really too bad. There have always been one hit wonders whose albums were mostly filler. But for many better bands with a reputation they were building or trying to upload, doing albums forced them to up the quality of their overall output. Listening to albums was often an experience, taking you on a sonic journey through an artist’s vision for that album. Labels wanted to milk every album for as much as it was worth, so overall quality was important. Look how many singles Def Leppard had off of the Hysteria album alone or Guns and Roses with the Use Tour Illusion records. Plus, there was always the added bonus of hidden gems… tracks that were never released as singles by the label, but were amazing songs buried in an album. I miss that.
     
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  12. cyclopean

    cyclopean Friend of Leo's

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    i played a really cool show at a fest that stretched across at least four venues last night, and the week before halloween i was at three different punk shows. i'm going to be skipping around at three different shows today for the same fest. live music is very much a part of my life.
     
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  13. OldGuy6873

    OldGuy6873 Tele-Holic

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    Very interesting vid about the music industry. Rick Beato is an incredible resource in that regard and his YouTube channel is awesome.

     
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  14. cyclopean

    cyclopean Friend of Leo's

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    i think that's what made japanese punk finally blow up in america. because it wasn't $30 import lps anymore.
     
  15. JL_LI

    JL_LI Friend of Leo's

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    This is a case of a synergy between consumers and producers, the producers in this case being the record companies, not the artists. iTunes changed the way many people buy music, from albums, both vinyl and CD, to downloadable singles. When CD's were readily available, I bought them, new and old releases, popped them in the player and listened to them during drive time. There were too many commercials on FM and too much I just didn't like on satellite radio. I still buy CD's on occasion and now store them in my car audio memory. I get a lot of music that isn't available on disk from YouTube. I have folders of mixes and folders from single artists that I've organized into albums on my own. YouTube and USB memory have replaced radio for me. We have Sirius radio in both cars because my wife likes to listen to CNN as she drives. We only rarely use it for music. I used to turn on the CMT music video channel but there now too much I don't like there too. There truly is a synergy at work. The industry changes the the content it provides and the way it provides content and consumers still seek out what they like while changing the way they seek it out.
     
  16. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Doctor of Teleocity

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    Personally, I could care less about today’s pop music, including those Nashville, so-called Country charts...Generally speaking, most of the artists I prefer, will likely continue the album format
     
  17. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I don't live in a mess. Life, for me, has never been better. I live in a great country, within a great society.
     
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  18. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    Before recording existed musicians had to perform live to make a living. Now that recordings can be streamed virtually for free, paying the artist zero or maybe 0.001 cents per stream, the vast majority have to get their income from playing live again. The recordings are for marketing purposes. The good news is that I see more millennials interested in live music these days....especially at craft beer venues. Live music was dying in my area until a bunch of craft breweries opened and now there’s a whole new scene. People are realizing that living with earbuds and FB’ing virtual friends is less satisfying than being out with real people listening to live music. Only bummer especially after this week’s mass shooting down the road is everyone has at least a tiny knot of apprehension as to whether a psycho will decide to go crazy that night.
     
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  19. bottlenecker

    bottlenecker Friend of Leo's

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    I think that's true, but I don't think it's because they moved away from focusing on the single.
    I do think some artists need to make singles and some need to make albums.
    I think it was inevitable that commerce would corrupt culture, turn music into shallow entertainment, then drop it when technology allows for other, more attention grabbing shallow entertainment.
    Whatever saves music, won't be the music business.
     
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  20. bftfender

    bftfender Friend of Leo's

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    me too,hard work def has made the American dream come true but there are many perspectives..come with me on my job for a year..and on some of the non profit things we participate in...there are days i smile and days i dodge bullets in this great country and great society
     
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