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Testing wiring harness

Discussion in 'Just Pickups' started by jayroc1, Apr 19, 2021.

  1. jayroc1

    jayroc1 Tele-Meister

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    Is it possible to test that my tele harness is wired up correctly before installing pickups? They're in the mail and wanted to check while I'm waiting
     
  2. kbold

    kbold Friend of Leo's

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    Tack a 10K resistor where the bridge pickup will be. Tack a 4K7 for the neck pickup. (These resistors are simulating the pickup resistance).
    (Different values, so you can check selector switch wiring.)
    Set volume to maximum and check with an ohmmeter at the jack output.
    Bridge pickup selected: o/p = 10K
    Neck pickup selected: o/p = 4K7
    Both selected: o/p = 3K2 (if the pickups are wired in parallel)

    This will check wiring is correct. Not a complete check: does not check tone wiring.
     
    Ron C likes this.
  3. Ron C

    Ron C Tele-Holic

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    Cool method, I hadn't thought of that!

    My initial thoughts were just focused on continuity testing. So the only thing I'd add is to confirm that hot and ground aren't switched at the jack.

    • Grab a multi meter that has an audible beep for continuity testing.
    • Put a regular instrument cable in the output jack.
    • Test that there's continuity for all the grounds to the sleeve of the cable's plug. (e.g. there should be continuity from the back of each pot to the sleeve).
    No need to continuity test the hot side if you've already done the test that @kbold laid out.
     
  4. dogmeat

    dogmeat Friend of Leo's

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    prolly too high of ohm values for a continuity test. check the specs for your meter but I doubt it. it would be better for spotting bad solder & such if you used low ohm values anyway
     
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