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Testing tru-oil and dye.

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Berniefist, Jan 15, 2021.

  1. Berniefist

    Berniefist TDPRI Member

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  2. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    You're going about it the right way by testing on scrap. Have you read compatibility guidelines on Homestead's site for Transtint? Been awhile since I looked at that. I know that Truoil is a linseed oil based varnish. Sometimes compatibility problems take a long time to show up with linseed oil. Anyway, I've had good luck with transtint in all the ways I've used it. I'll be interested to see your results.

    Best of luck!
     
  3. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    I've never had any luck trying to mix TransTint into TruOil.

    TransTint will disperse and mix into water, alcohol, lacquer thinner, lacquer, or shellac but not into oil-based mixtures like TruOil.

    It may seem to mix into oil-based products if you stir it vigorously, but it will quickly separate back out of the solution.

    But, TruOil applied over dried TransTint works great.



    It looks like you are off to a good start with your testing to find the best way to hit your target :).




    TransTintTDS-7-2013.pdf (homesteadfinishingproducts.com)

    .
     
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  4. dogmeat

    dogmeat Friend of Leo's

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    I agree with Mr Wrench. they don't mix with automotive clear systems either, but I have shot various clear materials over dried tint with good success
     
  5. Berniefist

    Berniefist TDPRI Member

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    It’s funny, because mixol is supposed to mix with tru-oil and it acts the same way. I can suspend it long enough to apply, but I think I’m abandoning it. It’s very hard to get a saturated color, and it’s hard to lay on thin enough to avoid blotches
     
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  6. Boreas

    Boreas Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Good luck, but I doubt you will be able to mix it directly into the TruOil. Any consideration of just mixing it 50/50 with alcohol and staining the wood first? Are you wanting the orange to be opaque, or do you want to see the grain through the finish?
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2021
  7. Boreas

    Boreas Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I couldn't get Mixol to mix with Minwax Poly either. I was able to mix it somewhat by mixing it in alcohol 1st. Allotta effort for the chips I was trying to repair on a maple fingerboard.
     
  8. Sconnie

    Sconnie Tele-Afflicted

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    I've had a lot of success using transtint mixed into denatured alcohol to lay down the color, then applying tru-oil over that. Mixing always seemed hard to do, but I never tried it so I'm curious what you find! Post lots of pictures of the whole process if you can, close-ups and all.

    Welcome to the forum!
     
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  9. mefgames

    mefgames Friend of Leo's Double Platinum Supporter

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    I agree completely. The denatured alcohol dries super fast, so the dye is absorbed very quickly so you can see the depth of color. It does darken as it dries, so make sure you give it a few minutes before you apply more to deepen your tint. Personally, I've never been able to Tru-oil a body to my satisfaction, only necks. I apply Nitro over the color.


    If you really want the grain to pop, try using a dark grain filler, I use Timbermate, then apply whatever clear you want.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2021
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  10. Sconnie

    Sconnie Tele-Afflicted

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    Yeah bodies are tougher, there's so much surface area. It doesn't dry/cure as hard as other finishes, that combined with a thin finish is just where one's expectations need to be. My results looked really good though, somewhere between satin and high-gloss, and easy to do without a workshop.

    The nice thing about using alcohol with the dye is how quickly one can get through grain raising, it takes no time at all! By the time I'm halfway to the color I want, all the little fibers are sanded away.

    When I had the zeal for it on my first neck project, I did enough coats of TO to build a film that I could polish. One, maybe two coats a day for a month and a half... but wow the results are really nice after polishing with old denim and a tiny drop of auto polish. It felt the similar to my 10+ year old Gibson neck, just a nice warn-in silky smooth gloss finish. Nitro might be possible for me someday, but not anytime soon, other than reranch aerosol type products.
     
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  11. Zepfan

    Zepfan Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    I applied Tru-oil over acrylic paint once. Have to wait awhile for the acrylic to fully dry first and as always, the Tru-oil goes on in multiple thin coats.
     
  12. Berniefist

    Berniefist TDPRI Member

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    So, on that dowel, the end is the part that is transtint in tru-oil. It kinda worked, but instead of orange, it’s a terracotta or saddle leather color. I suspect that whatever metals are used as pigment are trapped in suspension and not scattering light the same way. It’s a little blotchy as well, which is the same problem I had with the bass I did with tru and mixol.

    the other orange part was denatured alcohol and transtint after knocking down to 400 and a sealer coat of tru over that. The literature I read (from their site) said that some finishes may drag the pigment but I haven’t seen that with the first coat, so that’s probably where I’m headed.

    the next section has just tru, and I’m going to sand that back to 400 and try staining it. My goal is a gretsch style orange, and the top I have isn’t nearly as figured as the dowel, so I’ll see how it looks in the grain lines.

    I know lacquer is a harder finish, but the cure time is longer, I see this being a month long process with the tru oil on my schedule. I’m having to slow my roll and be patient as it is!
     
  13. bender66

    bender66 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Count me in the "wont mix" camp as well. I just tried it in a small bottle after others said that they had success. I didnt like the mixing result even before putting it on scraps.

    I tinted the neck first before applying TO, as others mentioned. It came out great.
     
  14. Berniefist

    Berniefist TDPRI Member

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    Ok, second coat is on.
    Alcohol and dye directly on wood is the likely winner. No sealer required for maple. The color stays true.

    the second coat of tinted tru looks.... better, but not anything I’d want on my instrument. Still more brownish orange. I can’t recommend this to anyone.

    Untinted tru as sealer- as per the label, this is useless. First coat seals so tight that almost nothing takes.

    tinted tru as sealer- also dubious. It collects in low spots and keeps that brown color.

    hopefully this will help someone.
     
  15. fraser

    fraser Tele-Afflicted

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    Weird...
    I know for sure the colourtone liquid stain from stewmac is water based- but ive had no problems mixing it with tru- oil.
    I have a bottle here i mixed up about 8 years ago,
    And its still good.
     
  16. RLee77

    RLee77 Friend of Leo's

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    Not sure why you want to mix the dye with truOil... I stained my tele neck with the stewmac dye, diluted with water, until I hit the desired tint, then used truOil. Mixing first seems like an added complication that is unnecessary.
     
  17. hamerfan

    hamerfan Tele-Meister

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    i used one layer of shellac as sealer, then tinted shellac, then several tru layers as finish.
     
  18. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    This. Compatibility with the base is important to not only get the desired effect but also to insure that the finish cures properly.
     
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  19. Berniefist

    Berniefist TDPRI Member

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    Funny thing, I had planned to use zinsser sealcote as a sealer. Looks like they made a bad batch. Nobody had it. Not Amazon, not HD, no Lowe’s. Woodcraft claimed to have one, but they said it was recalled. Woodcraft sold me bullseye shellac instead, which they said would be ok. Turns out the manufacturer and all the forums say that’s a bad idea. The wax in regular shellac sometimes causes adhesion issues with tru-oil. Ymmv, but I didn’t want to risk it.
     
  20. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Some oil based finishes will "stick" to waxy-shellac but many will have issues. Waterbornes don't like it either. While Sealcoat is my go-to for sealing and barrier coats, I've also mixed wax-free shellac from flakes over the years, particularly when there was a "color" desire for the shellac. Sealcoat is pretty much toward the blond side for shellac.
     
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