Testing neck pickup on 4 way

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by gobi_grey, Jan 23, 2020.

  1. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Is this wire connected? Can't see it in the photo...

    And sorry, what's the symptom again? No sound in any position?

    Also, perhaps most critical, I see the white/hot output jack wire, but not the common. How does the right vol lug get to the output jack?


    20200124_154600.jpg
     
  2. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Nevermind about the last point I raised. I see what you did. And do you have continuity from right vol lug to output jack, for sure? While we're at it, continuity from middle vol lug to output?
     
  3. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    What setting do I use to check continuity?
     
  4. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Most meters have a continuity or 'beep' setting. It beeps when there's near-zero resistance between the two probes. Quick test is to touch the probes together.

    If you don't have that, and if I recall you don't have an auto-ranging meter, so set resistance to the lowest range, and look for near-zero ohms.
     
  5. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    All three volume lugs give me zeros when the other probe is on the jack tip.

    Question:
    When I put one probe on the neck pickup lead and the other probe to ground, should I get the pickup reading? I get zeros. I do get a reading with a probe on both leads as long as that pickup is not selected.
     
  6. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Ah, I wasn't clear. I'm looking at the ground path. The output jack tip is the hot, and the sleeve or collar, and all the metal hardware around the jack, is the common / ground.

    1. Let's go one step at a time. Set meter to the lowest ohms range, and make sure you're in resistance mode (setting one may set the other, depending on your meter). With the probes touching nothing, you should see 0.L (open circuit). Touch the probes together, and you should read 0.0. Good so far?
    2. Now touch one probe (let's use the black) to the collar of the output jack. The metal bushing the jack sits in is good, too. Leave that probe there for the next few measurements.
    3. Touch other probe (red) to the back of the tone pot, on an area with no solder. You should see 0.0. If there's crap on the shell, scratch the probe around a bit. Good?
    4. Next, touch the red probe to the volume pot shell, again, in a solder-free area. Still 0.0? Good.
    5. Now, touch the red probe to the vol pot lug on the right, where the tone cap terminates. Still 0.0, I hope.
    6. Now we know for sure that the ground path from there to the jack is good.
    7. Do the same with the jack tip. Black probe on jack tip, red probe on middle vol pot lug. Still 0.0?
    8. Black probe on vol pot shell, red probe on the switch lug I highlighted with the arrow in my post #21. Again, stay off the solder areas when measuring the shell. For two reasons: first, you may not get a good connection touching a flake or blob of solder, and get a false reading. Two, we want to prove that the whole path is good, including that connection on the shell itself.

    Keep doing this, proving that every connection in that diagram is working. When possible, trace a larger segment that you think should be connected, and measure the whole thing (after you've checked each smaller segment first). Like we did with the ground path from jack to vol lug.

    Before we go further, though, I need to be reminded of what the actual problem is. You haven't said in this thread, I don't think. No sound in any switch position, with volume and tone dimed? Or something more specific?
     
  7. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm getting no sound at all in any switch position but when I wired the neck pickup backwards I got sound but it wasn't the right order. It was two bridge and two necks I believe. I found that strange and leads me to believe the issue is somewhere in the switch.

    I will test everything tomorrow. Thank you so much for your help so far.
    With probes apart, open circuit reads 1, touching reads 0.00. I'm assuming that is just a difference in meters.
    I've already tested about everything in there and there were only very few spots where I didn't get a connection including the open lugs on the switch. I will test everything tomorrow and highlight the spots where I didn't get a connection. Again, thank you.
     
  8. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Yeah, 1 vs 0.L is just a difference in meters. Open circuit.

    Because of your primary symptom, my steps direct you to check from output jack, backwards. Be sure each bit works before moving closer to the pickups.
     
  9. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    The reversed neck pickup thing makes no sense. I can't see how a bad switch would be the cause, either. Reversing the pickup should be OOP in combo positions, and same as usual in neck only position. Or in your case, you should still have no sound in any position.

    So, isolate. Test. One thing at a time.
     
  10. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    Everything I've checked has continuity.
    Strange... I removed the hot leads on both pickups. Now there is sound from the neck pickup when the switch is in the bridge position. Nothing about any of this makes any sense to me and frankly, I don't even want to make sense of it because I don't care. I just wanna play my god damn guitar. I'm a guitar player, not an electrician. I'll just buy another harness and try again or have a tech install it. No big deal.
    Not worth the time I've already spent on it and the headache. Gonna call it a day!
     
  11. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    I found the problem!!!
    It was a bad pickup wire. The neck pickup was shorted out when I screwed it onto the body.
    I think the pressure from smashing the wire between the bottom of pickup and the body caused a wire to break.
    Now for a solution... what to do...
    The pickup will touch the strings if I don't lower it. If I lower it, the pickup will smash the wires. Hmmm
     
  12. teleplayr

    teleplayr Tele-Afflicted

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    Take it to a luthier and have him route the pick-up slot deeper.
     
  13. bender66

    bender66 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Do you have to stuff the wire under the pickup?
     
  14. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    The wires come out the bottom of the pickup and bend outward. His pickups are taller than standard neck pickups so you gotta tighten the heck out of them to get them low enough to clear the strings.
     
  15. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    That would work. I ended up using the original pickup which fits just fine and soldered a cover ground on it. Should have done that to begin with. Would have saved a lot of headache.
     
  16. teleplayr

    teleplayr Tele-Afflicted

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    A luthier will have all the proper tools and it's a really simple job that shouldn't cost you that much.
     
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