Tell me about a Pro Reverb (and how it compared to a 65 DRRI)...

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by Bowpickins, Aug 13, 2019.

  1. Bowpickins

    Bowpickins Tele-Meister

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    Hi everyone!

    Title says it all. I have a 65 DRRI, and have had it on gigs while playing with a house in a country dance hall last year after a management change. I started with a new band this year, and we have gotten some pretty good gigs, have since acquired a Twin Reverb as we are playing bigger outdoor venues at louder volumes, etc. I play fiddle mainly with this band, but switch to lead guitar for a few tunes.

    I play fiddle and I need a clean tone. I run the fiddle into the 2nd input of the normal channel. I plug my guitar into the vibrato channel, input 1. My other problem is: since starting to use overdrive pedals, they sound harsh with the DRRI , which is why I am looking for the bright switch.

    Bottom line: I need clean, but not blaring loud. I have a twin reverb to cover that, and my Mustang III V2 and Music Man to cover small gigs.
    I like the 2x12 configuration of the twin for fiddle, and the optional bright switch on the vibrato side of the larger fender amps for guitar.

    So, based on this: what can you tell me about the Pro Reverb? Is 40 watts good headroom for medium-sized clubs, dance halls, with or without a microphone, theatres, etc.

    Just to restate: I am mainly a fiddle player, and some lead guitar. Play classic country ( Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings, Wynn Stewart, George Jones). :cool:
    Also play some blues and rock. I like a warmer, punchy, clean Fender tone. I don't mind not having a mids control.


    Sorry for the long post, but I know you all can help me! :D

    Thank you,
    Joseph. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2019
  2. Chiogtr4x

    Chiogtr4x Poster Extraordinaire

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    I can only speak of my own experience
    My first Fender amp was a '67 Pro Reverb, in 1990 and despite good tech maintenance and speaker swaps for the 10 years or so I owned it, it seemed kind of ' flat' one-dimensional, underpowered...
    I got a '68 Deluxe Reverb in 1997 or so in need of repair ( only $400!) , had it tech repaired and it absolutely blew my Pro out of the water! Amazing, portable, powerful
    I sold the Pro Reverb, bought a BJ as a backup...
    Sadly, needed $$ in 2016 ( hardships) sold the DR ( hell of an amp, miss it)
    Now happy with my BJ! ( it rocks too!).
    * Life gets in the way....
     
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  3. Bowpickins

    Bowpickins Tele-Meister

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    Thank you for the info. Wow! $400 for a '68 Deluxe is incredible! :D
     
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  4. Ricky D.

    Ricky D. Doctor of Teleocity

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    If it was my problem, I wouldn't buy a Pro if I had a Twin Reverb. I don't even understand why you would want one. The TR should sound great turned down.
     
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  5. 1300 E Valencia

    1300 E Valencia Friend of Leo's

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    The Mustang III V2 is 100 watts. It has great sounding Deluxe and Twin Reverb options / capabilities. All at any loudness you require, up to 100 watts. What else do you need?
     
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  6. Chiogtr4x

    Chiogtr4x Poster Extraordinaire

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    Well it did need service ( and $$) from time to time but with an Eminence Red, White, and Blues speaker ( high rated power) plus a good OD pedal, it was a
    ' giant killer' for Blues/R&R/ Country stuff I play
    Perfect amp...
     
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  7. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    A Pro Reverb is a slightly smaller, slightly lighter, less loud Twin Reverb. But... you already have a Twin Reverb.

    Unless "I do not need all that power" really means 'I do not need all that weight,' you've already got the TR that you need. If it's healthy, and has good speakers, it sounds fine at anything from low volume to blasting loud. Otherwise, the MIII with a broken-in speaker and set to the 65 TR voice will do the job at any volume and be lighter weight.

    Either amp should do well for you. I'd pick the TR because it has two channels you can dial in for fiddle and guitar.
     
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  8. bftfender

    bftfender Friend of Leo's

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    What i love about my Pro is it set up perfect for live use. did put weber f150 speakers in & tweak the normal to be pretty aggressive early. On Trem side have classic fender, i like it a lot.
     
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  9. Bowpickins

    Bowpickins Tele-Meister

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    I don't mind the weight of my twin. By "I do not need all that power", I simply mean the twin is still a bit loud for the dance halls I play at, which make up a good portion of my dates. :)
    I am just wondering about the 40-watt Pro and it's headroom vs a Deluxe Reverb Reissue. The way you described it: "Slightly smaller, slightly lighter, less loud twin", happens to be what I was hoping for.
     
  10. aerhed

    aerhed Friend of Leo's

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    How bout yanking two tubes out of the twin?
     
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  11. Teleguy61

    Teleguy61 Friend of Leo's

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    Pros are the same cabinet size as a Twin, and only marginally lighter.
    If you want less power from your Twin, pull a pair of the 6L6s. Either the inside two or the outside two.
    It messes with the impedance match, but not a deal breaker.
    Otherwise, open the Twin and put a switch in that will lift the cathodes of two tubes, again the inner pair or outer pair.
    That will make it a 40 watt amp, and maintain impedence match.
     
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  12. Bowpickins

    Bowpickins Tele-Meister

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    I edited the top post to try and clarify what I am after. I think it became fuzzy amongst my rambling. :D

    I am just curious about the headroom difference between my DRRI and a Pro Reverb.
     
  13. Ringo

    Ringo Poster Extraordinaire

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    I had an early 70s Pro Reverb, it was one of the best sounding older Fender amps I ever owned, and I've had Twins, Supers, Vibrosonic, Deluxe Reverbs etc...
    It's not much lighter than a Twin but it has a tube rectifier , to me a bigger fatter Vibrolux Reverb tone with 12s. Definitely more clean headroom than a Deluxe Reverb. And different than a Twin.
     
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  14. Obelisk

    Obelisk Tele-Afflicted

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    A Pro Reverb is essentially a Vibrolux Reverb with a more robust power supply, larger power transformer and 12 inch speakers. The Pro Reverb doesn't really compare to a DRRI beyond having a similar preamp. The 6V6 just sounds different than a 6L6. The Pro and Vibrolux are virtually the same amp. I think a Twin Reverb would be preferable for amplified fiddle, but I love my 68 Pro Reverb for guitar.
     
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  15. cyclopean

    cyclopean Friend of Leo's

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    wouldn't a fiddle sound better going into a bass or keyboard amp with a flat response or going into a di box into the house?
     
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  16. dannyh

    dannyh Tele-Afflicted

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    A Pro Reverb should give you more headroom than a Deluxe, but bear in mind Pros were generally thought of as under-powered back in the day, and a lot of guys replaced the output tranny with a bigger one, usually from a Bassman. I’d check that on any Pro I was looking at.

    The old joke about Pro Reverbs use to be that they were half the power but all of the weight of a Twin. Not totally accurate but they can be pretty heavy. That said, I like ‘em. The smaller OT adds a sweetness I don’t think you get with a Twin, but YMMV. And I’ve never heard a fiddle through one. Good luck!
     
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  17. 39martind18

    39martind18 Tele-Meister

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    Currently, I own and use a 1968 TR, and a 71 DR that is modified by the addition of a solid state rectifier and 6L6s for power tubes, resulting in a power output of around 30 watts. This gives me considerably more clean headroom, since the trannies in the DR cannot push the 6L6s to their full power or overdrive. I also added a 2x10 baffle loaded with 2 JBL D110Fs. The result is an amp that is more sonically akin to the TR than the DR, which was what I was after. My collection also includes a 1975 Pro Reverb, which is a sweet sounding amp, but is a bit redundant with my modded DR. _526.JPG _527.JPG
     
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  18. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Tele-Afflicted

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    You'd think that, but its not a sure thing in actual practice at gig volumes. Its counter intuitive, and counter to the marketing, but when you line up a bunch of amps with an acoustic instrument test, you may find the most flattering, and best gain before distortion is not with the solid state FRFR amps, but with tube amps like a Twin or Deville. If you are talking coffeehouse volumes, or at home, you may well never push acoustic amps hard enough to clip.

    Similarly, a Pro Reverb is half the power of a Twin, at 80% of the weight. So you may hit the hard clipping a lot sooner, defeating the point of a small savings in weight.
     
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  19. Alter

    Alter Tele-Meister

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    I would characterized the pro reverb as a smaller twin. Definitely more headroom than the deluxe reverb. I think it's a great solution if you want to downsize from the twin, but only for the smaller weight, otherwise the twin does everything better.. :)
     
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  20. Bowpickins

    Bowpickins Tele-Meister

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    I have run it through my bass amp, and while it does sound clear and clean on it's own: it still lacks punch or the cut in a band setting that the larger amps I've played through provide (at least in my experience). As for the DI, I have been run out of it once on a gig. I just couldn't hear it out of the floor wedge enough as with a combo. Not very ideal when you don't have frets. :lol:
    I also switch to guitar, too, so I would prefer an amp with the same set up as the DR or TR, with the normal channel set for fiddle and vibrato side set for guitar.

    Thank you for the advice, though! :)
     
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