Tele's love the amp most sold throughout the world

Henry Mars

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Jan 17, 2014
Posts
1,468
Location
Bucks Co. PA
I agree. They probably would have sold a lot more of them if they shipped with a better speaker.
My chief gripe about the C30 is reliability. I had to go though 2 Chinese made C30's before I got one that held together. Sometimes though the BJ makes more sense for the venue etc.
 

Les H

Tele-Holic
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Posts
875
Location
Kansas
In 2002 I went to a music store specifically to buy a Blues Jr.... Instead, I left with a red stripe PV Transtube Envoy 110 because it sounded better. I have never once considered trying/buying a Blues Jr again since that day.
 

Mike Eskimo

Telefied
Ad Free Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2008
Posts
22,915
Location
Detroit
1.) Bill M/Bill M/Bill M (When someone brings up someone who’s passed , say their names three times in remembrance)

2.) Though it’s much more limited and often noisy, I would vastly prefer a Pro Junior ! 🤣

3.) As the owner of two clones, and a real 1957, 5E3’s are their own thing and what they have in common with a blues junior is that they are both guitar amplifiers.
 

Kevin Wolfe

Tele-Holic
Joined
Jun 13, 2017
Posts
993
Age
64
Location
Lakeland FL
1.) Bill M/Bill M/Bill M (When someone brings up someone who’s passed , say their names three times in remembrance)

2.) Though it’s much more limited and often noisy, I would vastly prefer a Pro Junior ! 🤣

3.) As the owner of two clones, and a real 1957, 5E3’s are their own thing and what they have in common with a blues junior is that they are both guitar amplifiers.
In my experience, the only thing a 5e3 and a Blues Jr. have in common is a tweed skin.
 

archetype

Fiend of Leo's
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2005
Posts
7,921
Location
Western NY
I've never played through a Blues Junior, but have heard plenty of them first hand. I've always regarded the BJ as an affordable, entry level amp that gets the job done. Some folks are satisfied with that and want nothing more. That's cool, but...

Since 1995, many players have gone to great lengths to force their BJs to sound better than average. So many BJ owners have noted so many deficiencies in its tone and response that an entire cottage industry evolved to sell parts and kits to mod the BJ and overcome it's basic sound.

There's no way to quantify it, but the BJ could be the most modified amp design among all amps. That doesn't happen with an amp of proper design.
 

Flaneur

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
May 24, 2010
Posts
6,268
Location
Scotland
I've worked with a lot of players, who used Blues Juniors. Harp players seem to like them, the best- with a tube swap. I can dial in a useable base tone but I've never found an example which I considered inspiring.
I always think Fender misses a trick, by refusing to sell an affordable Tweed Deluxe reissue. Hand wired examples never come up for sale here, in the used market- and originals? Forget it. I think they'd sell a ton of simple Deluxes, at around the price they charge for a Blues Junior- especially now, that small amps are The Thing and House PAs are so good.
 

Chiogtr4x

Doctor of Teleocity
Silver Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2007
Posts
14,335
Location
Manassas Park, VA
I played gigs ( in Classic R&R, Blues, and Country bands)
pretty regularly from 2000-2018 with my blonde Blues Jr. ( repairs and upgrades along the way, but well maintained by good techs)

I think 'entry-level' ( maybe it is accurate) doesn't do justice to how good this amp sounded all-along ( usually goosed with a Blues Driver) many years.
Plenty of good volume, and the ability ( or my ability.too) to produce great clean or overdriven sound.
It sounded as good as any other Fender amp ( my environment) I was around- for years.
Mine is now relegated to 'big gigs' only, as I just can't carry it ( bad back), don't need it for my small gigs.
But it's been a great amp for me!
 

Attachments

  • 20180822_120635.jpg
    20180822_120635.jpg
    104.3 KB · Views: 23
  • 20200623_163716.jpg
    20200623_163716.jpg
    10.3 KB · Views: 24

archetype

Fiend of Leo's
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2005
Posts
7,921
Location
Western NY
I've worked with a lot of players, who used Blues Juniors. Harp players seem to like them, the best- with a tube swap. I can dial in a useable base tone but I've never found an example which I considered inspiring.
I always think Fender misses a trick, by refusing to sell an affordable Tweed Deluxe reissue. Hand wired examples never come up for sale here, in the used market- and originals? Forget it. I think they'd sell a ton of simple Deluxes, at around the price they charge for a Blues Junior- especially now, that small amps are The Thing and House PAs are so good.

Fender could put the circuit on a high-quality PCB, just like Tube Depot does. IIRC, TD even includes traces and pads for some of the common 5E3 mods.
 

Southboundsuarez

TDPRI Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2018
Posts
71
Location
60 miles southeast of los angeles
It's just my opinion but, based on multiple comparisons of EL84 and 6V6 tubes in my little class A 6 watt Cornford Carrera I hear distinct differences between the two tube types in question. The Carrera works with all tube types and I've come to enjoy the chance for head to head trials. In this case I've found that when switching back and forth between the EL84 and 6V6 using the 8 pin / 9 pin selector switch on the amps face plate any EL84 tube is always louder than any 6V6. Also, in all cases, EL84s are more defined and crisp with 6V6s favoring a slight tweedy grit. EL84s favor the upper mids and have a super tight bottom end. 6V6s favor the lower mids and produce more bass but the bass is not as tight or defined. Also, in this comparison, by using multiple guitar models, I've found the type of guitar pickup make a huge difference to the 6V6. Where the EL84 sounds great right across the board using all pickup types the 6V6 loses clarity and sometimes becomes a bit muddy through standard type humbuckers. When using Fender type single coils through the 6V6 their tone at least equals and sometimes surpasses that of the EL84 depending on the brand and age of the 6V6. NOS 6V6s are drastically better than current production. While I prefer and use NOS Amperex Bugleboy EL84s from the early '60s in my Bruno amps I do use new production EL84s in both my Cornford Hellcat, (Sovtek), and Mesa Mark V:35, (Mesa). I've also found some good current production JJ EL84s. Sadly, I've yet to find any decent current production 6V6 tubes and that's a shame because, when it comes to the swampy, gritty tweed type blues guitar tones as heard on multiple recordings using Strats or Teles the NOS 6V6 tubes are the best of the best for this purpose. In all other cases I prefer EL84s over 6V6s. Note* I've stated many types on TDPRI that EL84s are may favorite type of output tube and that remains true. Hands down. But even I, when going for vintage blues through a Fender single coil guitar would choose an NOS 6V6. It's like they were made for this task.
Interesting and informative experiences. Thanks for sharing your very real world and true to life experiences and opinion.
I myself in most instances and styles will usually prefer a 6v6 output tube.
I like an EL 84 mostly for high gain over top heavy distortion rock music tones on a budget. (Compared to EL 34 which I still consider also a good value as compared to beam power tubes)
I find that it is somewhat of a waste to utilize expensive and increasingly rarer NOS varieties of EL 84 vs new production in most EL 84 cathode biased guitar amp applications.
As it is has been my opinion that most of the time and especially true of the Blues Junior or modern manufactered Vox amps, that the EL 84 tube is a sacrificial component for tonefulness and somewhat of a given consumable.
Your experience most likely has greater mileage than my own. Considering the variety of amp applications you have regularly used.
I value your input and will have to give it greater consideration, with a more open mind.
I really like NOS 6v6 tubes and I find that the new production Reissue Tung Sol to be an outstanding 6v6 for it's value.
The JJ 6v6 seem to be more sonically characteristic of a 6L6
All modern production EL 84 all seem fairly similar. The JJ seem to be very stout.
For high fidelity I would go with a Telefunken or Bugle Boy/Amperex
The EL 84 is still an affordable and amazing tube for what it does and it's size!
 

Southboundsuarez

TDPRI Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2018
Posts
71
Location
60 miles southeast of los angeles
I would very much assume and vote the 5E3 Tweed Deluxe style and circuit to be the most commonly matched up amp to the Telecaster guitar.
As for the Blues Jr? A very worthy entry and overall versatile first step into the tube amp world. I would recommend a Blues Jr to any real serious beginner that is making a serious investment into their equipment as well as a great value based intermediate level player that wants to gig on a budget.
It is no 5E3 ! But I would consider a 5E3 circuit much more less expensive as far as from a manufacturing standpoint. I have built a number of 5e3's. As it is the circuit almost all hobbyist and beginner amp builders cut their teeth upon.
The Blues Jr not so much! Definately a trickier build as I can attest. Such as the Hoffman based Blues Jr. board design build I did not too long ago....
00001IMG_00001_BURST1640876507540_COVER.jpg
 

RetiredUnit1

Tele-Meister
Joined
Jun 18, 2022
Posts
320
Age
66
Location
SoCal
I have quite a few amps I've built, the 5e3 and my tele are a marriage made in heaven. Funny, I met Leo when I was 15 and he said "maybe some day you'll build my clones"... He also said "clone builders actually use cloth wire to make clones of my tweeds, I only bought that crap because I got a zillion feet of it for practically nothing"
 

Southboundsuarez

TDPRI Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2018
Posts
71
Location
60 miles southeast of los angeles
Tele's love the amp most "loved" throughout the world.

View attachment 997567
Don't overlook or dispel the Blackface Deluxe Reverb either! It is hovering very closely to the Vibrolex Reverb!
Not the same but just different enough flavor to whet the appetite. I would say that both the Vibrolex and the Deluxe blackface era amps are perhaps the biggest sleepers. Probably used on more of the most prominent recordings than what anyone would ever know,,,
These amps epitomize much of the sound and tone recognized as classic historical album oriented rock music
 

Southboundsuarez

TDPRI Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2018
Posts
71
Location
60 miles southeast of los angeles
I've worked with a lot of players, who used Blues Juniors. Harp players seem to like them, the best- with a tube swap. I can dial in a useable base tone but I've never found an example which I considered inspiring.
I always think Fender misses a trick, by refusing to sell an affordable Tweed Deluxe reissue. Hand wired examples never come up for sale here, in the used market- and originals? Forget it. I think they'd sell a ton of simple Deluxes, at around the price they charge for a Blues Junior- especially now, that small amps are The Thing and House PAs are so good.
Very good point and maybe someone at Fender would get the idea, but then again have you seen the price that the big box music stores tag the Custom Handwired lowly Fender manufactured Tweed Champ Amp ?
All of those factory custom Handwired jobs are $$$$
Prohibitively costly for what it is,,,, and that's at the Big Box Store discount prices. I can't imagine what full factory retail price!?!
Boutique builders certainly more competitive, but hit and miss as far as amateur to professional build quality and you end up paying for a name more than the gear.
Likely, best bet is do it yourself. So many kits available and competitively priced that you can hardly source materials yourself at a better price.
However, you can source better materials yourself but you are getting back up there in justifying the cost!
You just have to shop the middle ground as best you can, generally you will find your balance of tone vs buck and hopefully end up with a much superior lifetime investment quality rig.
 




Top