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Tele335

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by telemcCaster, Jun 5, 2010.

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  1. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    I was reading through some of Preeb's documentations and was inspired. If you read this Preeb, you are an inspiration. There are very many other talented and inspirational members here in TDPRI also. What a great forum.

    I noticed though that Preeb showed some old photos of the Fulerton factory making necks for Strats. They used a big shaper cutter mounted so the neck is run through back side down. The only safety feature was a small jig that kept the neck from moving too far and running into the heel area.

    I would not recommend that method to anyone especially if you are not SKILLED at woodworking, cabinetmaking or patternmaking.

    Here is my set up that is much safer but still is potentially a projectile wannabee. I feel safe using it because I created a safe workholding jig with handles that keep my hands far from the spinning bit.

    First I bandsaw out the neck blank and use a flush trim bit to make the profile.

    You can see I measured the density of this board at 49lbs/cu ft.
     

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  2. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Here is the shaper cutter and jig. I start by raising the bit so it just chamfers the edge and move into the rotation of the spinning bit, removing a very controlled small but significant amount of timber. Then I turn the jig around and run the other side. Now I turn off the shaper, lower the bit a half a turn and repeat. I sneak up on the final profile by watching how profile approaches the center of the round at the nut end. I am done when the cutter lines touch at the very center or leave just a small flat. This will leave it 1 inch thick since that is the thickness I started with.
     

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  3. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Then I flip the neck and saw the fret slots like this.

    I personally like this shape as it is right off the shaper but will sand the contours and thin it a bit, not much though. So it will come out around .97 to 1.0 or so.

    I think I am going to plane the fret kerfs off, radius the neck and cap it with B-B-B-B-Brazilian rosewood. This one is slated for custom wound Hb size, single coil pickups and will be on the very bright side. So I think the Brazilian cap will tend to warm it a bit. But...We will see.
     

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  4. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    On another note

    I am milling a white pine log for my double bass top wood...but I have a little private stock of guitar wood just for fun. :D:D

    My friend Isaac is a master at the mill and he doesn't even know the extent of his skills. This is my white pine log, standing dead down the road and I had my eye on it because it was 36 inches round. We brought the rounds to Isaac's mill and it was too big for his saw. So he said "I guess I am going to have to chainsaw it in half", nonchalantly. It took him 20 minutes and when done it looked like he used a circular saw. It was sawn perfectly in half as if he was cutting a carrot or something...skills.
     

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    Last edited: Jul 22, 2010
  5. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    We spent the afternoon quartersawing a half of this log and I still have one more to mill after that. Isaac was nice enough to allow me to store the wood at his mill and I will get back to it in August.

    I took a load back to the shop and stored stickered and stacked with a fan blowing on it to help it dry.
     

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    Last edited: Jul 22, 2010
  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    That is just awesome.... I missed this thread until now..... I always wondered about the bracing on the top of the 335. Did you individually fit each brace by using carbon paper or some similar method where you try it, sand it and try it again until it is perfect?
     
  7. Controller

    Controller Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    You sir, have amazing skills. Thank you for giving us a look into your craft. I look forward to more pictures of the steps leading to a finished guitar.
     
  8. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    No, chalk fitting is not necessary because the whole thing is a kind of sandwich which distributes the tension. Unlike a violin or cello bass bar which can eventually cause sinking of the center if the ends are sprung, there is no chance of that happening because the plate is connected to the center block making everything stable.

    Sorry for the delay, but it is rental season rush in the violin business. the caption for this photo is

    "DON"T ASK!!!!!"
     

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  9. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Yes that is a cello gone bad.
     
  10. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Number one is still at the painter, can't wait to show it though.

    I am going to show another way to brace the top contour bracing. It is easy to do with a vacuum bag which distributes pressure very evenly but it can also be done with standard luthier clamps like this.

    These strips of spruce are premium grade. Not necessary but that is what I have here so I used them.

    I plane each one flat on the bottom.

    Put them in place precisely...er by eye. Put a strip of tap across them and flip over to apply glue.

    Clamp them like this.
     

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  11. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    And you can see the kerfing and a couple hard points on the ribs for strap buttons and plug. The center block is a laminate of light maple on top and spanish cedar on back. The kerfing is spanish cedar also.
     

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  12. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Hello. ;)
     

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  13. backsideslappy

    backsideslappy Tele-Afflicted

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    This thread has to be one of the most interesting in a long while. Great to have an insight into some very skilled craftsmanship dude, many thanks.
     
  14. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Thanks backsideslappy, love the name.
     
  15. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    The neck for this one is a no rod, 100 year old very hard maple with absolutely NO flex whatsoever. I mean an elephant could stand on it. It is capped with Brazilian Rosewood as described in another thread. ( link)

    I know it is blasphemy to paint this curly maple but I am thinking BLACK relic. with cream binding. Painted headstock and natural neck shaft. There will be plenty of time for foofy bursted plum pudding purple and all that for the others.
     

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  16. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Nothing fancy and pretty messy.
     

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  17. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    A router jig can make pretty quick work of making the contour braces flat and even with the bottom. I have done it that way. But in keeping with the simple hand tool theme here I will use a plane.

    Yep...lots of shaving and plenty of elbow grease, but hey, 30 minutes of arm exercise in the morning...
     

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  18. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Check the flatness with a straight stick.
     

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  19. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    A little more to go...
     

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  20. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    This tool is not really to sand it flat but to check that it is uniformly planed. Sanding scratches mark the spots to plane a little more.

    You could spend all flippin day sanding... Use a plane.
     

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