Tele Neck - 2-way truss rod - Headstock Adjustable?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Engraver-60, May 12, 2020.

  1. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    Is this possible? Anyone already did it? Photos, tutorial?

    TIA -- getting ready to route the neck for the 2-way truss rod, and just would like convenience over aesthetics.
     
  2. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    Absolutely. Route your channel starting at the tail end and stopping just under the nut.

    IMG_4640.JPG

    Make a drilling jig for a long bit and clamp it on the head. Its a little tricky getting this started, the bit wants to move up the curve part of the head

    IMG_4648.JPG

    Install the truss rod in the usual fashion. Fill the last little bit of the slot at the heel with some scrap

    IMG_4654.JPG
     
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  3. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    Can you oversize drill it, plug with a contrasting wood (say ebony or walnut), then re-drill for the access? Want it to be purdy. Maybe a bushing in the drill jig to accomodate the smaller drill?
     
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  4. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    Certainly. You could easily drill the access hole oversize and put a contrasting bushing in the hole. It would be a whole lot easier to drill the hole before the curve was made, but that would make it harder to line up. I simply routed the channel, then measured from the top of the neck to the center of the adjuster. You know how much has been removed to make the face of the head, that gives you the distance that the hole in the guide block needs to be from the face. Drill that on a drill press, its pretty critical. As I said, the bit wants to walk up the angled face - I took little pecks at the angel to get it started. There might be a better way.

    I had considered putting a contrasting plug in the hole and then drilling that but decided it would be too hard to get everything center. If I was going to try that I would drill the larger hole and make the contrasting bushing to fit it. I knew I was going to put a veneer on the face so I figured that was enough contrast. Also I had to add the 20 thou thickness of the veneer to the calculations since I had not glued that on yet.

    The veneer added one more challenge - I had drilled the hole but the veneer covered it. I had to come back and find it, drill thru the veneer and then open up the hole with a rat tail rasp.

    You might want to take a look at the drilling jig that Hiscock shows in his book for making a one piece neck. It is the same problem - drilling thru the angled head into the cavity routed from the back - it has the additional problem of being angled.

    Last, but far from least, have you considered that very clever right angle adjuster that Gotoh makes? It comes out of the treble side of the heel and there is no hole at the head end. I have not installed one but I did use a Warmoth neck that had it installed - I was impressed and if I ever built a fender style neck again I would sure consider it.
     
  5. Steve Holt

    Steve Holt Tele-Afflicted

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    That's what Fender does on the American Strats and teles. One thing to consider there is if your plug expands it can crack the neck around where the hole is drilled. So if I was doing it I would make sure the piece I had was pretty stable.
     
  6. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    Freeman, you got me thinking about this - instead of cutting the thickness of the headstock all the way back to the tangent of the curve up, and creating the curve - just cut flat down to the thickness cut. At that step I can drill the oversized hole flat into the face, the install the stable piece of hard ebony or blackwood cylinder, glue it in place. When the glue has set, re-drill for clearance to the adjuster. Then curve the slope up to the nut. OK?

    Ebony or blackwood (kiln dried and stable - good contrast to the flame maple. OK?
     
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  7. Mr_Q

    Mr_Q Tele-Meister

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  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    If you use a bullnose/roundnose bit for the truss rod nut access cavity, you'll have to remove less wood than a straight bit. This will add strength.
    Rout the slot when the wood is a rectangle. Then before you move the fence, put in the roundnose bit and continue with the truss rod nut cavity.

    In a F style neck, the rod nut would have to be low or you might flip the rod so the nut is upwards. I'm not sure if the physics of doing that means extra strain on the rod though... I wouldn't do it...but that's me.


    This is Rex's neck.


    rex.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2020
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  9. eallen

    eallen Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I do all my necks two-way head stick adjust as the other guys are showing. My only variation is that rather than drilling an access hole after, I just extend a 5/16 bowl bit out into the headstock while doing by truss rod route. Then I use a round file after thicknessing the headstock to slope it from the top of the headstock to the truss rod adjuster for a hex key to fit nicely.

    Either way works and personal prefrence.[​IMG]

    Eric
     
  10. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    Marty: On a 2-way truss rod isn't there a flat bar that's captured? Does that go on the bottom or the top of the neck? If the flat bar goes on the bottom, then a regular flat router it would be the bit of choice; but it goes against the underside of the fretboard a bil nose router bit would be correct. Right? Never had a guitar with a 2-way truss rod, so it's all new to me. BUt thanks everyone for the helpful advise.. The best forum on the Interweb, by golly, by gosh.
     
  11. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Look at a Hot rod and look at the blue import rods. True hot rods have two round rods. Import rods have a flat bar and a round rod. The round rod is on the bottom with the nut, so technically it's on the bottom of the slot. The bitterroot rod at the bottom is welded at the end of it unlike the hot rod which is not, but has a block with reverse threads. Welded technically means it's a one way rod, like a Ric style rod. The dual action rods with left handed threads have a nut brazed on. The welded rods have a nut that may come off if you loosen it.


    https://www.stewmac.com/Materials_a...MI2_H0ttWv6QIVWNyGCh1HZgBEEAQYAiABEgKRyfD_BwE


    https://www.stewmac.com/Materials_a...MI2_H0ttWv6QIVWNyGCh1HZgBEEAQYASABEgJ6R_D_BwE


    http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...0001&campid=5338148343&icep_item=291403195034

    dual action

    http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...0001&campid=5338148343&icep_item=254589271608


    https://hazeguitars.com/blog/rickenbacker-truss-rod-adjustment
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2020
  12. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    Engraver, if you decide to use the LMII rod as I do, it has a flat bar and the threaded rod. The bar goes on top so it presses against the underside of the fretboard. You can sort of see the flat bar in the third picture posted above. The LMII rod also has a couple of little bumps on the sides of the two end blocks, those will make it a tight fit into the channel so it can rattle or move around.

    LMII will include very good instructions about routing the channel and setting the rod into it. It is educational to put the rod in a neutral state and then give the adjuster one turn clock wise and one turn anti clockwise to see what is happening inside that slot.
     
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