Tele made in Indonesia Worthless?

northernguitar

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I have two Yamaha Revstar guitars that were both made in Indonesia.

They have far better fit and finish than anything I've ever seen from Gibson and seem to be equal to any Fender I've owned.
I have a Revstar and at one time owned an entry-level one. I agree that they are exceptional guitars. But then, just about everything Yamaha cranks out is fantastic. I disagree that they have a better fit and finish than my Gibson, or the many others I’ve had the opportunity to play.
 

G.Rotten

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Thats what i was just told,tele squier thinline made in Indonesia are worthless,is this true? i was trying to sell it,,,brand new,,,took $150.00 off what i paid,had 3 people tell me their no good.TRUE?
Well..... It's worth less than a MIM Fender but worth whatever price is the difference between you selling it or keeping it.

There are a lot of bullies and a lot of sob stories. In the end you're likely wanting to sell to use that money for something else. If you don't get enough there's no point to selling.

On the other hand if you're selling because you hate it, then that's something to consider too.
 

rsclosson

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I sold my Indonesian made Epiphone Masterbilt archtop, not because I disliked it, but to finance another purchase. It was a fantastic guitar and I still miss it. Build quality, sound and feel was pure paradise!
 

Asmith

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Just to pile on MII guitars are fine. I’ve played more than a few guitars and my squire VM telecaster special has always been number 1 or 2 on my list of favourites.

Regarding splitting humbuckers, mange you’re expectations for the split tone. If a fender single coil tone is the primary tone you’re after then I think you’re always going to be disappointed. I regard coil splitting as good enough in a pinch but they generally sound weak unless they are specially designed for multi purpose, like Seymour Duncan p-rails. There may be exceptions
 

jvin248

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.

The problem is you are selling a Vintage Modified Squier and buyers 'know' Bullet and Affinity Squiers. The models are different, but they all say Squier so you have a challenge to sell.
I usually recommend that either you buy a Bullet/Affinity Squier or buy a MIM Fender if you are intent on spending more, due to this particular resale problem.

Generally the used market, even if you only 'drove it off the lot' and just tuned it up once, sell for 60% of the new version price. Sometimes you can get more when there is a shortage of gear out there like now.

Indonesian-made Squiers are quite well made, all of them. The only down side is Fender has the factory carve skinny necks on them (meanwhile all of Squier competitor brands carve necks like MIM/MIA), and the pots/switch/jack are all the typical import types that have poor durability but that only takes $20 to upgrade. The fretwork on the Indonesian Squiers has been quite good for a long time -- Fender or the Squier factory finally learned that to keep beginning players playing they better have good frets otherwise players go back to video games rather staying in a hobby where they end up with a fleet of much more expensive guitars, most often of the core brand they learned on.

.
 

northernguitar

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Years ago, I picked up a very beat-up Yamaha Pacifica. I wanted to experiment with a rebuild, thinking it could be a stepping stone to working on a more valuable guitar.

I stripped the paint off of it, refinished, added a full block bridge, TexMex pickups, new electronics, a bone nut and fretwork (professionally done). I was now into it for about $300. Over time, I realized the frets were filed down to a very low level, so I found a replacement neck for $100. The neck needed fretwork and a new nut, so back to the tech it went, with additional time spent on setting it up to a tee. Add $200.

I now have a $600 Pacifica, and I’m actually pretty happy with it. After his work, the tech remarked that it had something that made it sound great.

I’d be lucky to get $150 for it.

Point is, it’s a Pacifica and there’s a plethora of other choices available. The market rules. This guitar is worth whatever I could get for it, but it’s a keeper now.
 
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bgmacaw

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A dishonest buyer will try to get a discount by using country of origin or manufacturing year. A ill-informed buyer will often do the same based on something they read on the internets (especially if they read forums full of corksniffers).

Indonesian guitars factories are quite good, usually better than those made in China, especially on the lower end (less than $500 or so). Part of this is because Cort and others transferred the knowledge that was obtained in Korea and continued to improve on it. From watching videos, I also get the impression that Indonesian workers are more motivated to produce a good product, generally speaking.
 

Fiesta Red

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I’ll go out on a limb and say that there are very few Fender or Squiers made in the last decade to decade and a half are even bad, much less worthless.

I’ve played Fenders and Squiers of all price points from beginner import models up to Custom Shop, and I would say the great majority of them were gig-worthy, right off the rack…they might need a set up to fit my preferences, they might not have the features I prefer, I might like a different “feel”, but none of them have been truly worthless.
 

Squiretele777

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I dont have that model of squier but I will tell you that mine is the first fender guitar american made or other , that I have not wanted to gut entirely , I did replace the switch to a fender 3 way and the pots to CTS and an orange drop for the green chicklet but none of that affected the tone of the guitar , the pickups , the set up, intonation action were perfect for me , so this BS about where it is made has no bearing on any thing , if its a player then its golden , I have had more issues with american made fenders and gibsons than I have had with my asian ones.

if you dont like your pickups get a set you like and try them it cant hurt , if you sell it keep it stock , no sence in sinking money into it for your tone , you will not get that back on the resale , if you decide to sell it
Yup,i,ve decided to keep it,and change pickups,,i already have the coil split pots installed,so,,,easy fix.
 

Squiretele777

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So people just give away used Squiers?

What a crock.

You came to the right place, OP, and I hope you're reassured. Second-hand pricing rules are the same for Indonesian guitars as for any others. A good guitar is a good guitar.
I did come to the right place,,and thanks to everyone here,,,you,ve opened my eyes,,,THANK YOU ALL
 

kafka

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Keep it. Play it. It's a good guitar with no economic value. It's not like it's possible to have too many guitars. If someone shows up who appreciates it, then you can sell it to them. Or hold on to it until you meet someone who needs a good guitar, and give it to them.
 

Asmith

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Just speculation of course.

I reckon the op is being lowballed because a barely used guitar has a small market. People buying used guitars are looking for deals, 40% off new prices and people who want to buy new guitars buy new guitars.

So the OP probably does have it listed much higher than the average used price for this model hence the low ballers but at the same time the guitar is as new as possible and should be priced higher than the other used guitars.
 

G.Rotten

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Just speculation of course.

I reckon the op is being lowballed because a barely used guitar has a small market. People buying used guitars are looking for deals, 40% off new prices and people who want to buy new guitars buy new guitars.

So the OP probably does have it listed much higher than the average used price for this model hence the low ballers but at the same time the guitar is as new as possible and should be priced higher than the other used guitars.

If you're talking about a 4k Custom Shop model then a 25% drop from new might be enough.

But when talking about a $400 guitar then most people would just add the extra $100 for a new one.

My favorite is "Save the Tax" for this almost new thing.

Save the tax but hey no warranty, good deal! ;)
 

Matthias

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Re; overseas guitar factories.

Vietnam is the new Indonesia.

Indonesia is the new South Korea.

South Korea and Mexico are on par.

Japan = US build quality.

Okay, I'm gonna shut up now.
:(

Mainly agree there. Japan is a real mix so ‘made in Japan’ doesn’t automatically mean it’s amazing, especially when buying used. Fender’s Japanese guitars have been a real mix of models at different price-points and specs. A lot of their stuff was aimed at mid-range and, by today’s standards, nothing too special. My 90s Tele was pretty much a rebadged Squier. Super cheap parts but it plays great. My 90s Thinline reissue is good but a little behind the modern MiM specs-wise. My MIJs have all had flaws, more so than my MiMs, but other buyers have different luck. These were all GREAT options at the time… Quality and expectations have risen though and I’m presuming this is showing in the newer MIJ Fenders too.

Yet, I’m not forgetting the Japanese factories do turn out some world-class work. I periodically GAS far a high-end Yamaha. And I know there are some really stunning Japanese Fenders too.
 

Beakybird

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Did you go with the SD P Rails? To get all three sounds, wouldn't you need a 5 way switch And a coil split? I'd be curious to know about the noise level on these.
Good luck with your beautiful guitar!
 

Willie Johnson

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I payed $575.00 plus i payed $130.00 to have 2 coil splits installed
So, $450 USD. I don't think you should expect to recoup the $130 on the mods--buyers tend to pay more for original condition. I have an early 90's American Strat with Fender Custom Shop pickups and a neck-on push-pull, but I'd get more in resale if it was exactly as it left the factory, even if my changes make it more useful as an instrument--just the nature of consumer preference/demand.
 




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