Talking to People with a Slang Fetish?

Skydog1010

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I watch a lot of British crime fictional series, about the only thing worth watching on the tube these days - anywho the folks all over the UK seem to have approximately 50 words for the same thing, watching helps keeping me sharper than I might be otherwise. I love the omission of the word "the", just fancy it very much. "M" was taken to hospital, because lift fell while going to loo. Just love it, you lil buggers.
 

Skydog1010

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I say , hold on to that True Texas accent, please, that stuff I believe ads to our depth and character.

Your old enough to remember Y2K the internet was going to die and everything was supposed to end , yeah?? Molly Ivins a great Texas Wit, wipe smart and that wrote well enough for the nnnew York times and several other publication that still appreciated intelligence and integrity in the quality of the thing printed in there News Papers and Magazines , any way Molly Ivins once wrote that if Y2K happened people in west Texas , wouldn't know that it happened or be affected by the communications disaster.
I must ask do you think that's true or a regional dig from someone living mostly in Austin?
You know a sly sort of humor that she was famous for.😉
If you get a chance try her books .
World's flat ya know.
 

Skydog1010

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In my part of Texas, I also deal with a lot of different dialects that can be grouped under
the category of Tex-Mex or Spanglish. It takes the ear a little time to adjust. A co-worker
used it often, then would criticize me by claiming that I didn't speak Spanish. Well,
strictly speaking, he didn't, either, but there was no use making a big deal out of it.
I love listening to East Texas "Tyler"drawl.
All 3 minutes of it.
 

cyclopean

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Oftentimes, it's an affectation that's exclusionary.....like people who talk jargon around other folks not "in-the-know". It's a form of passive-aggression to belittle other people.
I try to turn it around when someone insists on doing it.....keep repeating "WHAT?" every time they won't talk in "common" language. Either they get the message or not, but if they're not serious about communicating, it's THEIR fault. ;)
Or yours, for not getting with the program.
 

ping-ping-clicka

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Or yours, for not getting with the program.
Gentlemen , gentlemen , please, what's wrong with a little friendly passive-aggression to the belittlement of other people. We are all friends of the same species and fruit from the same tree. Beside what's the harm in roughing up a stranger as long as there nothing more to it than a shiner some sore ribs and minor head ache. Isn't that a way of saying welcome to the family.
Or yours, for not getting with the program.
oh really?
 

Fiesta Red

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I say , hold on to that True Texas accent, please, that stuff I believe ads to our depth and character.

Your old enough to remember Y2K the internet was going to die and everything was supposed to end , yeah?? Molly Ivins a great Texas Wit, wipe smart and that wrote well enough for the nnnew York times and several other publication that still appreciated intelligence and integrity in the quality of the thing printed in there News Papers and Magazines , any way Molly Ivins once wrote that if Y2K happened people in west Texas , wouldn't know that it happened or be affected by the communications disaster.
I must ask do you think that's true or a regional dig from someone living mostly in Austin?
You know a sly sort of humor that she was famous for.😉
If you get a chance try her books .
Oh, I don’t plan on massaging my accent out of my life…in fact, I revel in it and use it to my advantage; people automatically deduct 10-15 IQ points when they hear my accent. Go ahead…underestimate me…that’ll be fun!

My daughter has developed the knack to use her normal accent, her Professional Voice and her second tongue (Spanish) to her advantage…after all, there’s no way a girl that pretty with that accent can be very smart, right?
Again…underestimate her…that’ll be fun!

However, I’m acutely aware that some people from areas far-flung (both within the US and otherwise) have a hard time with my occasional odd pronunciation and colloquialisms, so I know when to “adjust the contrast,” so to speak. When I worked for a Japanese company in the early 90’s, that was my first exposure to very much Asian culture—and not just Japanese (the work force was VERY varied). I learned a lot about that part of the world, and they learned to respect my culture as well. I’d never been so proud to be called “Cowboy”…but that’s also where I learned to speak with proper diction in order to communicate.

Re: Molly Ivins
I’ve read a lot of Miss Molly’s writing, both books and articles; she was definitely a stylist and her tongue was sharp enough to separate skin and sinew. She could be very funny. I think her little Y2K dig was probably regional with a dash of truth; we forget how far-out some areas of west Texas are, to this day—some of them didn’t have ANY internet service well into the early 00’s, much less a useful connection in 1999.

The only thing I didn’t gel with Molly is sometimes talked down to/about people who she didn’t agree with. She sometimes forgot (when aiming her wit) that lacking a formal education or a quick repartee did not constitute lack of intelligence.

One of the most brilliant men I’ve ever known quit school in the 3rd grade and was functionally illiterate most of his life; but he was a survivor and he was whip-smart on how to make things work, mechanically and situationally. He sounded kinda funny when he talked and he usually got “old sayings” wrong, but he spoke two-and-a-half languages (Spanish, English, and a half-German dialect common to central Texas).

He fought racism (both in an interpersonal way and officially) throughout his life and became one of the first successful minority business owners in the tiny enclave of River Oaks (the city inside Fort Worth, not the neighborhood in Houston)…but he didn’t rail about the injustice, he just sidestepped it and said, “That won’t work…let’s try again” until the unjust person was so tied up in knots (personally and legally) that they either had to change or go out of business. Some of the sons of those old crusty folks came to his funeral and told me that Fred was the reason they started respecting “Messicans”.

He finally learned how to read (English and Spanish) in his 50’s and then he did so voraciously on all matters technical, business and Biblical, until his eyes betrayed him with macular degeneration (in his late 70’s)…but well into his 90’s, he could quote, chapter and verse, most of the stuff he read—and then apply it fairly accurately to whatever situation he was facing (sometimes with his own humorous flair of malapropisms, both accidental and intentional).

Wisdom isn’t inferred with a PhD.

He raised two daughters and a son, lost one of the daughters in childbirth and then raised that little girl, too. I’m sure glad he gave his blessing to me marrying that last one (even if I was a white boy)…and I sure miss him every day, too.
 
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nojazzhere

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Oh, I don’t plan on massaging my accent out of my life…in fact, I revel in it and use it to my advantage; people automatically deduct 10-15 IQ points when they hear my accent. Go ahead…underestimate me…that’ll be fun!

My daughter has developed the knack to use her normal accent, her Professional Voice and her second tongue (Spanish) to her advantage…after all, there’s no way a girl that pretty with that accent can be very smart, right?
Again…underestimate her…that’ll be fun!

However, I’m acutely aware that some people from areas far-flung (both within the US and otherwise) have a hard time with my occasional odd pronunciation and colloquialisms, so I know when to “adjust the contrast,” so to speak. When I worked for a Japanese company in the early 90’s, that was my first exposure to very much Asian culture—and not just Japanese (the work force was VERY varied). I learned a lot about that part of the world, and they learned to respect my culture as well. I’d never been so proud to be called “Cowboy”…but that’s also where I learned to speak with proper diction in order to communicate.

Re: Molly Ivins
I’ve read a lot of Miss Molly’s writing, both books and articles; she definitely was a stylist and her tongue was sharp enough to separate skin and sinew. She could be very funny. I think her little Y2K dig was probably regional with a dash of truth; we forget how far-out some areas of west Texas are, to this day—some of them didn’t have ANY internet service well into the early 00’s, much less a useful connection in 1999. The only thing I didn’t gel with Molly is sometimes talked down to people who she didn’t agree with. She sometimes forgot (when aiming her wit) that lacking a formal education did not constitute lack of intelligence.

One of the most brilliant men I’ve ever known quit school in the 3rd grade and was functionally illiterate most of his life; but he was a survivor and he was whip-smart on how to make things work, mechanically and situationally. He sounded kinda funny when he talked and he usually got “old sayings” wrong, but he spoke two-and-a-half languages (Spanish, English, and a half-German dialect common to central Texas).

He fought racism (both in an interpersonal way and officially) throughout his life and became one of the first successful minority business owners in the tiny enclave of River Oaks (the city inside Fort Worth, not the neighborhood in Houston)…but he didn’t rail about the injustice, he just sidestepped it and said, “That won’t work…let’s try again” until the unjust person was so tied up in knots (personally and legally) that they either had to change or go out of business. Some of the sons of those old crusty folks came to his funeral and told me that Fred was the reason they started respecting “Messicans”.

He finally learned how to read (English and Spanish) in his 50’s and then he did so voraciously on all matters technical, business and Biblical, until his eyes betrayed him with macular degeneration (in his late 70’s)…but well into his 90’s, he could quote, chapter and verse, most of the stuff he read—and then apply it fairly accurately to whatever situation he was facing (sometimes with his own humorous flair of malapropisms, both accidental and intentional).

Wisdom isn’t inferred with a PhD.

He raised two daughters and a son, lost one of the daughters in childbirth and then raised that little girl, too. I’m sure glad he gave his blessing to me marrying that last one (even if I was a white boy)…and I sure miss him every day, too.
Your story of your Father-In-Law was interesting, partially because I had a VERY similar experience. In college (early 1970's) I had a job for two summers with Ridgmar Development Co. We maintained vacant lots in Ridgmar, as well as the grass "islands" around the apartment complexes as you enter Ridgmar from the freeway. I worked with their one full-time maintenance employee whose name was Jack. He had been a poor West Texas dirt farmer before he "came to town". He only passed the third grade (on the second try) if his father promised he WOULDN'T send him back the next year for the fourth grade. That was fine with his father.....he wanted Jack home to help work the farm. He had funny ideas about college.....for example, he couldn't believe I hadn't learned about exotic hand tools or how much roof a square of shingles covered at university. He was functionally illiterate....his wife had to fill in his time sheet every week. His real name was George, but he was called Jack because when young, he'd ride a donkey to town on Saturdays, and because the DONKEY'S name was Jack, people would say (as he rode in) "Here comes JACK"......and the name stuck. Jack was a whiz at repairing mechanical things. He could fix ANYTHING on the Ford tractor we used, or the commercial mower I was assigned to. Jack "looked" Hispanic, from working all his life in the sun, but got very indignant if anyone said he was Hispanic. (although back then, the term used was "Mexican") Jack was the first real inkling (to this somewhat snotty kid) that formal education was not the "end-all-be-all" of intelligence......something it took me years to fully understand. ;)
 

ping-ping-clicka

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I speak English with little slang. I expect that same courtesy in return.
What I expect and what I get are two different things, 25% of the time is to teach me to curb my expectations of others, 35% of the time I forget the context of the lack of civility of those I am attempting to communicate with and I have to take responsibility for, as so much of the time others don't extend the favor of considering my expectations simply because of my imperious nature as has been pointed out to me on multiple occasions.
cc6ad9f5eeb9ead9ca7cba40a80bec0b.jpg
 

cyclopean

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You are clearly the one being difficult. That is on you.


Gentlemen , gentlemen , please, what's wrong with a little friendly passive-aggression to the belittlement of other people. We are all friends of the same species and fruit from the same tree. Beside what's the harm in roughing up a stranger as long as there nothing more to it than a shiner some sore ribs and minor head ache. Isn't that a way of saying welcome to the family.

oh really?
 

fasteddie455

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I have a buddy of mine who makes up words. He gets upset with you when you don't understand him. I always have to tell him that, if he wants me to understand him, then he has to use words that more people than just himself would understand! It is ok that he does this but then don't get angry with me for not knowing what a word you made up means!!!!
Kinda sounds like that Stanley fella in the post above this one!!! Sigh…

Communication breaks down if the other party don't understand you.
 
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Wound_Up

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I love listening to East Texas "Tyler"drawl.
All 3 minutes of it.

Hmmm. Not sure I know that one. I'm just east of there, across the border in Louisiana. We probably have our own over here lol

My best friends wife is from Longview, though, and she's always had a pretty severe drawl lol.
 

tvvoodoo

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Anyone here know what the speech affectation is called when (typically younger ladies) add that extra annoyed sounding "wah" syllable at the end of a statement?
"C'mon let's gooo-wah!"
 

Wound_Up

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Oh, I don’t plan on massaging my accent out of my life…in fact, I revel in it and use it to my advantage; people automatically deduct 10-15 IQ points when they hear my accent. Go ahead…underestimate me…that’ll be fun!

My daughter has developed the knack to use her normal accent, her Professional Voice and her second tongue (Spanish) to her advantage…after all, there’s no way a girl that pretty with that accent can be very smart, right?
Again…underestimate her…that’ll be fun!

However, I’m acutely aware that some people from areas far-flung (both within the US and otherwise) have a hard time with my occasional odd pronunciation and colloquialisms, so I know when to “adjust the contrast,” so to speak. When I worked for a Japanese company in the early 90’s, that was my first exposure to very much Asian culture—and not just Japanese (the work force was VERY varied). I learned a lot about that part of the world, and they learned to respect my culture as well. I’d never been so proud to be called “Cowboy”…but that’s also where I learned to speak with proper diction in order to communicate.

Re: Molly Ivins
I’ve read a lot of Miss Molly’s writing, both books and articles; she was definitely a stylist and her tongue was sharp enough to separate skin and sinew. She could be very funny. I think her little Y2K dig was probably regional with a dash of truth; we forget how far-out some areas of west Texas are, to this day—some of them didn’t have ANY internet service well into the early 00’s, much less a useful connection in 1999.

The only thing I didn’t gel with Molly is sometimes talked down to/about people who she didn’t agree with. She sometimes forgot (when aiming her wit) that lacking a formal education or a quick repartee did not constitute lack of intelligence.

One of the most brilliant men I’ve ever known quit school in the 3rd grade and was functionally illiterate most of his life; but he was a survivor and he was whip-smart on how to make things work, mechanically and situationally. He sounded kinda funny when he talked and he usually got “old sayings” wrong, but he spoke two-and-a-half languages (Spanish, English, and a half-German dialect common to central Texas).

He fought racism (both in an interpersonal way and officially) throughout his life and became one of the first successful minority business owners in the tiny enclave of River Oaks (the city inside Fort Worth, not the neighborhood in Houston)…but he didn’t rail about the injustice, he just sidestepped it and said, “That won’t work…let’s try again” until the unjust person was so tied up in knots (personally and legally) that they either had to change or go out of business. Some of the sons of those old crusty folks came to his funeral and told me that Fred was the reason they started respecting “Messicans”.

He finally learned how to read (English and Spanish) in his 50’s and then he did so voraciously on all matters technical, business and Biblical, until his eyes betrayed him with macular degeneration (in his late 70’s)…but well into his 90’s, he could quote, chapter and verse, most of the stuff he read—and then apply it fairly accurately to whatever situation he was facing (sometimes with his own humorous flair of malapropisms, both accidental and intentional).

Wisdom isn’t inferred with a PhD.

He raised two daughters and a son, lost one of the daughters in childbirth and then raised that little girl, too. I’m sure glad he gave his blessing to me marrying that last one (even if I was a white boy)…and I sure miss him every day, too.

Lol whoops.

"Professional voice" somehow turned to "businesswoman" lol.

Guess I should pay better attention.
 

pixeljammer

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Anyone here know what the speech affectation is called when (typically younger ladies) add that extra annoyed sounding "wah" syllable at the end of a statement?
"C'mon let's gooo-wah!"
I think that's called whining.
 




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