Synth Pedals, Anyone?

Discussion in 'The Stomp Box' started by ShortintheSleeve, Dec 5, 2019.

  1. bondoman

    bondoman Tele-Meister

    Age:
    29
    Posts:
    379
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2018
    Location:
    vallejo ca
    I started on the old Roland GR-1. Now days use either the GR-55 or Fishman Triple Play. Different for sure as you need to adjust your playing technique for certain applications. Tracking has become far better over the years but off or mis-tracked notes due to player error are still the same. Dead on and precise are key here. Slow down to go faster is my advice.
     
  2. teleman1

    teleman1 Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,192
    Joined:
    May 16, 2003
    Location:
    Arizona
    Synth 9 EHX. A pleasure after my Roland synth guitar and the Roland synth and the cable all farted at the same time. It just all sits in a box.
     
  3. MuddyWolf

    MuddyWolf Tele-Meister

    Age:
    57
    Posts:
    292
    Joined:
    May 11, 2017
    Location:
    Paradise, Ca
    What I find good about the synth 9 is that it can sound like a synth player just joined your band if you add some in the mix with the synth level knob. It kind of sounds like another person is playing with you . If you are trying to play a guitar synth and sound like a dx7 or Juno but played with a guitar then I say learn keys. Which I did. But I might still get an sy1 or SY300 just for fun.
     
  4. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,103
    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2003
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, California
    One thing for people to understand is that with synth pedals your guitar is just acting as a controller. The sounds being generated have nothing to do with your guitar-- the sounds are 100% synthesized. Substractive synthesis takes
    oscillators (digitally generated nowadays) to create sound waves such as sine or saw waves, and then morphs them through filters, other oscillators (such as LFO- low frequency oscillator),
    an ADSR amplitude envelope (attack-decay-sustain-release), and other effects to create the sound you hear.

    The guitar is just used as a controller
    to pick up the frequency of the note you want to play and sometimes its loudness if the synth engine has the ability to pick up on the amplitude of your attack. So if it feels a bit artificial, it is, by design. This is completely
    different from an effect like a wah-wah where you are just coloring your sound. In this case the synth engine is creating sounds that have nothing whatsoever to do with your guitar's tone since they are being created by
    separate oscillators-- digital oscillators rather than the actual oscillation of your physical strings.

    Now it is true that sometimes you can blend in your actual guitar signal, too. As MuddyWolf said-- this will sound like someone is "doubling" your playing because indeed the synth engine is generating a totally independent sound
    that happens to be tracking what you're playing very closely. But its decay could be quite different from the decay of the notes you are playing, for example.
     
  5. memorex

    memorex Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    3,631
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2015
    Location:
    Chicago
    With the assortment of pedal wah, touch wah, triggered filter, pitch shifter, and harmonizer effects in my GT-100, I can more synth-like tones than I can think of songs to use them on. I definitely don't need an external pedal to get synthy effects. But sometimes it's just cool to sit there and make those sounds because you can.
     
  6. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,103
    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2003
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, California
    I think that another excellent application would be convincing horn tones. I play in a funk band and we have a sax player, but no trumpet or trombone.
    If one of us two guitar players were able to play trumpet parts that sounded very trumpet-like for the horn hooks, that would be cool. To my knowledge
    none of the synth pedals are really focused on that aspect. The more programmable ones in theory could be used to get pretty close. But when
    you hear how convincing some of the sampled sounds can be on modern keyboard workstations, it's totally do-able. I think a good horn emulator
    could be more useful to a lot of guitar players than the organ/kb emulators.

    On the other hand, I just play the hook on guitar and having it be guitar+sax instead of trumpet+sax is okay.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.