Sweet Little Angel

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by BluesBlooded, Mar 30, 2016.

  1. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    I resized the fretboard to fit with the new dimensions.

    I added an arc at the bottom of the neck joint and pulled two lines at the first and twelveth fret. The line at the 1st is set 0.820in long and .940 at the 12th fret as per Gibson's website

    [​IMG]

    Joined these reference line with a line that will be the bottom of the neck

    [​IMG]

    Extended the line at both ends

    [​IMG]

    Made a circle with a radisu of 1.25 inch and made sure it intersected with both my btoom arc at the center and the bottom neck line

    [​IMG]

    Trimmed the unwanted curves

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    I don't know why exactly but I decided to work on the end for a while. Started to make the nut by making a rectangle

    [​IMG]

    Extruded a solid out of that rectangle

    [​IMG]

    I rarely delete curves I use to build surfaces. I usely move them into layers that I hide from view. So when I want to reuse a curve, I make it visible and use it. Like in this situation. I used the 12 in radius circle that serverd to cut the fretboard.

    [​IMG]

    Aligned properply and extruded the solid required to cut the radisu in the top of the nut.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Recreated the surface with the loft command

    [​IMG]

    Created a filet of 2mm on the surface of the back of the nut

    [​IMG]

    and a 1mm filet around the side edges

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    That is enough nutty stuff! Let's move back to the neck curves
     
    Blue Bill and guitarbuilder like this.
  2. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    Somehow my sub conscience knew I had to stop working the neck and move onto the nut.

    I was making an error.

    The curve that joins the neck joint arc and the bottom of the neck was not ok because my neck was at 0 degree and not at the 4 degree angle it was supposed to be. No big deal, delete the curve, rotate the neck 4 degree and redo the circle

    [​IMG]

    Voilà

    [​IMG]

    Notice that kink where the circle joins the line. I cut the offending part and used the blend curve command to join both lines

    [​IMG]

    That is much better

    [​IMG]

    I start to add arcs at different places to shape the bottom neck. I may not use all of them to make the surfaces, but I have options to work with.

    [​IMG]

    I start by making a surface with the Sweep 2 rail commands between the two arcs

    [​IMG]

    I then use the Curve Network command to make the triangle surface. Did the same on the other side.

    [​IMG]

    Create the surface of the neck with the Sweep 2 rail commands

    [​IMG]

    You may be wondering why I left a space int between the neck heel curve and the neck shape. The reason is that two surfaces in different direction will create a kink when joined together like this

    [​IMG]

    To prevent this, it is better to leave some space between the two different direction surfaces and use the Blend surface command to create a surface in between.

    [​IMG]

    I select G4 curvature continuity and play with the slider with the Preview box checked. I can see the best result and click OK when happy.

    [​IMG]

    You can see the results is far better

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Here is the neck with the body

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Next up will be the tenon and headstock.
     
    guitarbuilder likes this.
  3. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Here is a hint for making topographical lines that result in sweet arching. Your lowest line, in other words the line just inside the perimeter should be rendered so that it is sections of circles. To achieve this in rhino you can take the existing line and analyze it in different areas where there looks like there might be an obvious radius. Then replace that line with the actual radius. Move to a different spot analyze that radius and replace it. You will be left with a series of circles. Then connect the circles with smooth lines. Trim it all and you have one line of your topographical map. Now move on to the next elevation and do the same.

    The arches in the horns is bizarre. I'm not really sure how to go about getting this correct. All I can say about it is it looks like a blanket is covering 2 sausages. Lol
     
  4. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Jeez, you're almost done! ;)
     
  5. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Here is a good photo. [​IMG]
    See the line where it goes from arching to flat. That line is pretty sweet. Another words there are no bumps.
     
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  6. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Poster Extraordinaire

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    Wow, that looks great. Andre, here's what I imagine your rig looks like:

    dnews-files-2014-04-lhc-restart-670x440-140407-jpg.jpg
     
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  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I like that use of blend in a space between the surfaces, I'll have to try it that way. Normally I just try blending two adjacent surfaces, usually to no major improvement.
     
  8. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    Yep almost

    Yep almost

    Yes it's quite useful, I too was unable to get satisfactory results from adjacent surfaces.
     
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  9. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    Ken, that picture is awesome. The light shows the details well. I'm sure my horns curve are too flat compared to yours. I will use this picture as a reference.

    I'm not sure I get what you are saying. Is this something along these lines

    I could not find the radius of the curve of the guitar when I used the what command.

    I created circle around what should be the far most curve.

    [​IMG]

    Made some cutting line

    [​IMG]

    and split the circles

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    Blended some curves

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    The result is sub par.

    [​IMG]

    I will carve the top I have and compare with your picture and see if I can adjust the curves from there.

    Thanks for the help.
     
  10. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

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    couple of good ones there! the blend surfaces and triangle thing. will stow those away!

    great progress!
     
  11. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Yes that is the idea I had.
    Cad is a whole world in itself. Once you know the commands you can sweeten the curves. There are other ways to achieve good arching also.
     
  12. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks Ken, I'll keep it in mind and practice that technique to see where it gets me. CAD is an all new thing to me. I'm learning a lot but still have a lot to learn and practice.

    Back to the neck, made a rectangle for the tenon

    [​IMG]

    Made a curve to where I want the tenon to extend

    [​IMG]

    Extruded a solid along the curve. The fun thing about it is that going along the curve transposed the angle of the fretboard to the tenon itself without any effort.

    [​IMG]

    Added the lower part of the tenon and created a curve to extrude along

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    [​IMG]

    Trimming the second part of the tenon to give that small angle on top of it. Made a single line I extruded and then used the trim command to remove the upper part.

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    Switched view to the top, made my image visible and drew a line for the round end of the tenon. Again, I extrude that curve to cut the end of the tenon.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And here we have a tenon.

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    It's now time to make the neck mortise.

    Hid the neck except for the tenon. and duplicated the bottom edge of the surface, which I then extended outside the body and joined with a line. The reason being that a boolean difference or trim does not always work on surfaces that are contiguous. The best approach is to have the cutter bigger and extend outside the surface to cut.

    [​IMG]

    I extrude that curve and made a surface with the bottom as well.

    [​IMG]

    trimmed the inside portion of the body and top plate to create a perfect mortise the exact size of the tenon.

    [​IMG]

    Deleted the extrusion used to cut the mortise. I had to recreate the surface inside the mortise with loft commands

    [​IMG]
     
  14. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    As you probably figured out by now, I had a slow day at work!

    Attacked the harder portion of the neck, the headstock and transition.

    Made a reference line at 17 degree

    [​IMG]

    Displayed the image and made two arcs to create the side of the head

    [​IMG]

    With a simple mirror copy the other side is duplicated, perfectly identical. I now make another arc to shape the end of the headstock. I do not want to use Gibson's. I will try to make an S end so it goes with my logo made of my last name which has two S in it.

    [​IMG]

    Mirrored the other side

    [​IMG]

    And flipped the other way.

    [​IMG]

    Kind of weird, but I'll push forward and make up my mind once I have tuners, the logo and so on.

    Fixed the kink in the middle by cutting the middle portion and blending the curve. Now a lot smoother

    [​IMG]

    Copied the curves 5/8 in lower

    [​IMG]

    Created some surfaces to have an idea where this is going

    [​IMG]

    Now for the fun part, the neck headstock transition. I created the first curve that I adjusted using the control points

    [​IMG]

    Added some more arcs to refine the process

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    Made some surfaces

    [​IMG]

    This is where I started to run into troubles, so I will play with this transition a bit more and show the results when I find a satisfactory way to build them.
     
  15. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    There must be a special class in Rhino school for Boolean....:) It hardly works for me. I think you need to get rid of extra curves and surfaces that are in the area of the Boolean though.
     
  16. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    Have you read this?

    http://wiki.mcneel.com/rhino/booleanfaq

    Worked the headstock shape a little. I thought that the right side was to high compared to the left side

    This is my first version

    [​IMG]

    Here's the refined version

    [​IMG]

    I think it flows better and is more symmetrical, but that is not a dramatic change from one version to the other.
     
  17. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

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    Wow, Andre! You must be some sort of Rhino savant. You seem to have caught onto this really quickly. That's some great work you've done there. And i like your headstock shape. I did something similar on my TelePaul guitar I've been working on for about 4 years now :D

    [​IMG]
     
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  18. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

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    andre,

    that is just how i did my neck transition. i imagine there are other approaches but it worked out fine. i do have a couple of fine "seams" that arise but they are easy to sand smooth after production. your blend surfaces treatment might help there.

    i see you angled the entire neck to allow a vertical extrusion of the headstock. this is where the whole C plane business might come in but my experience with C planes has been a bit confusing.

    love the headstock curve

    steve
     
  19. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks Roger, Great headstock design;). I really dig your logo, I think it is well thought and it looks really good. Must be a pain to cut and fit without a CNC. Regarding Rhino, I'm no savant, but there was a huge improvement in the last two months.

    Thanks Steve, I will use this approach again, it's just that some of the curves were not properly positioned and gave bad results when I created the surfaces. One error I made was to make that nut filet too quick. I needed the sharp corners to snap the headstock curves on. I also have some difficulties to create the arcs in the transition. It's hard to see in 3D view where they should be until I add the surfaces onto them.
     
  20. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

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    yep, that IS the tricky part of doing the transition that way. really have to work to see how the curves need to be to give the correct surfaces. it does seem like theres possibly an easier way but maybe not.

    hey, andre, a thought on the mortise:
    thats how i do my cut as well. however i have found that it is a little sloppy if i cut the mortise to the exact dimension of the tenon. what i have done is to manually scale the tenon down in x,y,z so that it is 0.3mm smaller on all sides and use that to boolean. i get a nice snug fit that way. i think its better to maybe have a little sanding to do than to end up loose.

    steve
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2016
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