surfin with the mighty 2x12" PRO REVERB

Discussion in 'Amp Owners Clubs' started by eddiewagner, Jun 16, 2009.

  1. 6BQ5

    6BQ5 Tele-Afflicted

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    Ok, now I'm looking at possible picking up one of two Pro Reverb amps, and but have some choices to make and wanted to get your input. Both of them are Mid to late 1970's Silverface.

    Amp #1

    1978 With Original Speakers, and has the original footswitch. Casters have been added, and three prong power cord added. Everything works "tip top" (i.e. no scratchy pots, no hums or hisses, etc.), it was mechanically and electronically well cared for. However, cosmetically, it is beat up. The previous owner was a smoker and there are some cigarette burns in the tolex, and it generally looks like he gigged with it a lot, and it has been dragged in and out of every bar from here to Des Moines.

    Amp #2

    Mid to late 70's (unsure of exact year, but silverface era). $100 less than amp # 1, but its been modified. The "normal" channel has been modified to be a more high gain channel (a la tweed bassman or a marshall kind of deal). Supposedly its a common mod on two channel amps and is easily reversible by an amp tech. Also, its missing the footswitch. . .

    My thoughts are this:

    -Regardless of cosmetic condition, amp #1 seems like a better buy, because
    A) it has the footswitch which is easily $30 to replace right there
    B) Theres potential for more money to be put into it reversing that normal channel mod (though to be fair, I'm likely to always use the vibrato channel, and I suppose theres a chance I could like the modified normal channel).
    C) If the cosmetics bothered me, replacing the tolex is kind of a normal thing, so if/when I go to resell it, a retolexing wouldn't kill the value the way a channel mod/de-mod would.

    What would you do? Would you walk away from both?
     
  2. viking

    viking Friend of Leo's

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    Only you know what to walk away from....If the mid seventies amp is a 45w verison , and the 78 is an ultralinear 70w amp , they are not that compareable
    The 70w model is not attractive to a lot of us , because its basically a clean machine. That may be just what you want , but be aware of the differences.
    It will also be a lot heavier than the 45w version
    I wouldnt care about changes to the normal channel , if the rest of the amp told me I could get a good deal. None of my vintage amps have a tube in v1
     
  3. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity

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    I would rather have an amp that had an internal modification removed than one that was recovered. This is a lot less invasive than you might think and the dry channel does not need that many components or changes to restore it to original. Recovering the amp will have a far greater affect on reducing the resale value.

    If only one of them is the 40 - 45 watt version, I would consider that one. I would have no interest in the 70 watt later version.
     
  4. ravindave_3600

    ravindave_3600 Friend of Leo's

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    This ^
     
  5. 6BQ5

    6BQ5 Tele-Afflicted

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    Thanks everybody! That was super helpful!
     
  6. jaytee32

    jaytee32 Tele-Meister

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    Who can clarify this :

    "The "ultra-linear" solid-state rectifier versions are perhaps the least desirable of the Pro Reverbs, along with the later 1980-era blackface versions, 1980s-era blackface versions were far superior designs to the previous and manage to retain the vintage sound with technologically superior reliability. They were discontinued in 1982."

    Copied from Wikipedia. It first seems to say that the later era Pros (1980s) are least desirable, then seems to go on to say that they are far superior in design and retain vintage sound. How can those both be true?

    Ps I have an 1980s Pro...
     
  7. ravindave_3600

    ravindave_3600 Friend of Leo's

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    First, the wikipedia article should be commended for speaking the truth: 60s Pro Reverbs are "the best all-around amp ever made- by anyone” .

    Second, that last paragraph has significant problems and needs to be re-edited. It doesn't make sense in English.

    Finally, do you like your 80s Pro? Enjoy the tone? Love playing it? If so, it's a great amp.
     
  8. Mexitele Blues

    Mexitele Blues Tele-Holic

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    Anyone still playing their Pro Reverb? Mine's been with me for almost 20 years now, through jam bands, bar rock, blues jams, and even one club band. Easily the most versatile amp I have owned.

    [​IMG]
     
    Mezzamort and pondcaster like this.
  9. ravindave_3600

    ravindave_3600 Friend of Leo's

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    Hey there Mexi-Tele! I don't often have an opportunity to turn up 35 watts but my blackface is still the amp I love. Versatile, warm, slightly hairy, it's the most "alive" amp I know. Thanks for waking up this thread.
     
  10. Mezzamort

    Mezzamort TDPRI Member

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    I have a 66 pro reverb and I will never let it go!
     
    ravindave_3600 likes this.
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