Supper Clubs

imwjl

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Tracy had married into the family, but who, I don't know. Mr Fix-it had done work for them for decades. I'd chat with him if he was over doing work at the place I lived, and of course, he was a Smoky's fan.


I'm interested in what your mom may have to say.

Cool to run into other Smoky's people here!
Pretty boring stuff. My grandmother had shop near campus and later on Monroe St. when Campus Drive was built (eminent domain move). My mother of that depression and WWII era went to West High, UW, and had part of her career in the capitol building. My 1960s style day care was riding around with grandparents and the tailor shop meant deliveries all over. It seemed like that meant just about everyone was familiar or not one of their acquaintances.
 

studio1087

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They’re just very old-fashioned restaurants where they serve a veggie tray and dip and put it in the middle of your table and they have great bakery and breads and it’s always kind of dimly lit and they have really old fashion food. it’s like a Wisconsin old fashion thing. And it always feels very Home like. They always have a bar and people drink lots of brandy and it’s a comfy place to to me.
 

Ronzo

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My Supper Club experience was a visit to the “San Su San” in Mineola, NY. It was an after-prom dinner/entertainment thing. My date (later my former wife) was of mixed Sicilian descent. She always wanted to go there. We saw Jerry Vale as the entertainment.

The scene in Goodfellas with their girlfriends was, basically, exactly what the place was like. We maintained a loooww profile. First real mob place I’d ever been in. Not the last one, though. 😏
 

CharlieO

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They’re just very old-fashioned restaurants where they serve a veggie tray and dip and put it in the middle of your table and they have great bakery and breads and it’s always kind of dimly lit and they have really old fashion food. it’s like a Wisconsin old fashion thing. And it always feels very Home like. They always have a bar and people drink lots of brandy and it’s a comfy place to to me.
That's it right there. That's all anyone needs to know.
 

howardlo

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During my school years I recall going to one in particular, Drury Lane in Chicago, a number of times. I remember one time Forestt Tucker performed in a play and then did a solo monologue/comedy thing. He was originally from Indiana and asked if there were any there from Indiana, we were from NW Indiana so got to raise our hands and asked exactly where we lived.

I know we went to another but can’t recall the name.

My wife went to one in Chicago more recently with her sisters and the play was interactive with the crowd (the play was Tony n’ Tina’s Wedding that was a really popular play).
 
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CharlieO

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During my school years I recall going to one in particular, Drury Lane in Chicago, a number of times. I remember one time Forestt Tucker performed in a play and then did a solo monologue/comedy thing. He was originally from Indiana and asked if there were any there from Indiana, we were from NW Indiana so got to raise our hands and asked exactly where we lived.

I know we went to another but can’t recall the name.

My wife went to one in Chicago more recently with her sisters and the play was interactive with the crowd (the play was Tony n’ Tina’s Wedding that was a really popular play).
Dinner theaters are not supper clubs.
 

hnryclay

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A very mid western tradition. In the south I have never seen a supper club. There are high dollar exclusive clubs, which serve dinner, usually have a small number of guest rooms, occasionally have live entertainment, and are networked throughout the east coast, and Britan. Memberships vary, the only one left near me is 3600 dollars a year, and invitation only. I am not a member, but have been with a friend who was through his work. Very upscale, and an elderly clientele. Mostly married bussines people who want to network. We have the opposite as well in the ever present and very supportive of local music Moose lodges, which for the most part have decent food, cheap beer, and will pretty much let anyone in who is not a known problem. I think I would like to visit a supper club sometime, but I doubt I will ever be in Wisconsin.
 

KyAnne

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This doesn't have anything to do with Supper Clubs per se but as far back as I can recall the "Diners Club" Card was the first card for "eating out" and one of the first "Credit Cards" I can remember. Before that it was the "Gas Cards".
 

brenn

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I live in Kentucky, so the last "supper club" I heard of was the Beverly Hills, before it burned down in 1977 (165 dead, 200+ injured). I think it's likely Kentucky businesses stopped using the term "supper club" after that. One of few cases I have studied in both the police academy and law school.

This gives an idea what they did there.

"On Saturday, May 28, 1977, the Beverly Hills Supper Club was operating beyond capacity, largely due to the popularity of that evening's Cabaret Room show, featuring popular Hollywood singer and actor John Davidson. Based on its number of exits, the Cabaret Room could safely accommodate about 600 people, according to the calculations of the Fire Marshal; on this night it exceeded capacity, with people seated on ramps and in aisles. According to later estimates based on seating charts and memories of those present, the number of people in the Cabaret Room at 9:00 p.m. on May 28 was between 900 and 1,300. Regardless of the exact number each gives, sources agree that the room was well beyond its safe holding limit.

Elsewhere in the club, patrons were eating gourmet meals. Later estimates place the total number of people in the Beverly Hills Supper Club on May 28, 1977, at approximately 3,000, substantially more than the 1,500 people fire code allowed at the time for a building with the number of exits the club had."
 

Junkyard Dog

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We had one in Alabama. I always thought they called it a "supper club" to circumvent the local laws prohibiting booze, pool tables, live music, strippers, etc. Like I never considered actually going there to eat supper.
 




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