Suitable Tools For Guitar Necks, and Cheap Wood for practice

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by Wind Gatherer, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. Wind Gatherer

    Wind Gatherer TDPRI Member

    Age:
    22
    Posts:
    59
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2018
    Location:
    UK
    OK thanks am about to search the forum on shaping necks and this, facets method.
     
  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    20,444
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    I have a thin rectangle and the curvy one. The curvy one doesn't see a whole lot of action, mostly scraping glue joints.
     
    Nickfl likes this.
  3. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    1,682
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Location:
    London, UK
    Poplar (Tulipwood in UK) is pretty cheap...
     
  4. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    42
    Posts:
    3,181
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2018
    Location:
    Pittsburgh
    If you want to be able to use them if the turn out well, they need to be one hundred percent knot free and perfectly straight sawn regardless of whether or not they're quartersawn or rift sawn.

    If you're just practicing shaping, is try to find some wood that is similar to what you'll use. Eg, sycamore if you intend to use maple later, or khaya or sipo if you think you might want to use some kind of mahogany.
     
  5. Wind Gatherer

    Wind Gatherer TDPRI Member

    Age:
    22
    Posts:
    59
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2018
    Location:
    UK
    Just reading your thread from March 2012, neck carving by drawing and creating facets on the wood.
     
    guitarbuilder likes this.
  6. Wind Gatherer

    Wind Gatherer TDPRI Member

    Age:
    22
    Posts:
    59
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2018
    Location:
    UK
    Um, been reading guitarbuilders thread from March 2012, neck carving by drawing and creating facets on the wood. Though it might be quicker than using rasps, as in the Fletcher Guitars YouTube.
     
  7. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    1,682
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Location:
    London, UK
    You might be best served combing all these questions and threads into one. it will be easier for all to follow. Try starting a build thread in the Tele Home Depot documenting your journey

    :)
     
    guitarbuilder likes this.
  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    20,444
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County

    Well if you don't fall asleep, there is probably enough info in there to make a neck....:).
     
    Treadplatedual likes this.
  9. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    20,444
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County

    I can't say many use a spokeshave and none that I recall over the years have used a drawknife. Popular tools are rasp and files, Surform type tools, razor files, and abrasives of one form or another. There are a couple grinder and belt sander folks.
    https://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Types_of_Tools/Files/Razor_Files.html

    I even bought a humongous router/shaper bit for a hand rail to do it. That was scary.

    https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gr...MIrbym36OA4QIVDp7ACh3zTQkREAQYAiABEgIYMfD_BwE

    Only used it once.


    The problem that I experienced with a spokeshave ( guitar number 1-6) was how my poor technique caused dips that were really hard to sand out. That's when I bought my Ferrier Rasp. The wider cross section helps keep things flatter, at least that was/is my experience.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2019
  10. Count

    Count Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,771
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2009
    Location:
    Tenterfield, Australia
    I was taught to use a Drawknife by my Grandfather back in the early 60s, he was a Wheelwright and Coach Builder. I inherited and still use his main drawknife which was originally his father's, it has passed down through Gt Grandad, Grandad, Father to me. A drawknife takes a lot of practice to use properly and the ability to "read" timber is essential. That is, the grain pattern of the timber and the nature of the timber itself dictates how you use the knife. The size of the knife is largely irrelevant for a guitar neck but a smaller one, as shown, would be easier to control. However, once you can use a Drawknife properly and know how to sharpen it rasps, files, spokeshaves etc will take a back seat.
     
  11. Wind Gatherer

    Wind Gatherer TDPRI Member

    Age:
    22
    Posts:
    59
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2018
    Location:
    UK
    :)
     
  12. Wind Gatherer

    Wind Gatherer TDPRI Member

    Age:
    22
    Posts:
    59
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2018
    Location:
    UK
    OK thanks.
     
  13. Wind Gatherer

    Wind Gatherer TDPRI Member

    Age:
    22
    Posts:
    59
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2018
    Location:
    UK
    Thanks for that.
     
  14. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    67
    Posts:
    6,905
    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2009
    Location:
    Rocklin Ca.
    I bought one of these years ago, I know I paid nowhere near this price. I use it for final shaping heads on neck. It's also incredible tool for final shaping of guitar bodies most my guitars are one of a kind so making a template really not necessary, Plus not a big fan of those giant pattern bits. The spindle sander has turned out to on of those sleeper tools they just have so many uses great shop tool.
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00006JZZW/?tag=tdpri-20
     
  15. Wind Gatherer

    Wind Gatherer TDPRI Member

    Age:
    22
    Posts:
    59
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2018
    Location:
    UK
    OK thanks.
     
  16. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,142
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2012
    Location:
    North of Boston
    Doug Fir can be a good wood for practicing necks on. I like quartered Doug Fir for actual necks if I'm doing a barncaster or Pine style build. It makes a good test subject because the soft and hard grain/rings takes some patience to level and make smooth. You really need to pay attention when building a neck out of Fir, Spruce, Pine or the like because of the big difference between the hard and soft grains.
     
  17. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,142
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2012
    Location:
    North of Boston
    That is a great thread.

    I had thought about building a gig for the ROSS to make the facets the issue I came across is heat. The oscillating belt sander part made the blanks to warm
    and they would slowly bow or warp as they cooled. It could have been that I tried to take too much off but I think it might have been the opposite in a way. I was taking longer trying to sand less material off but that cause the belt and the wood to warm up as I continued to shape the neck. I had the same issue with the router bits I bought. They heat up the wood so much that you run the risk on movement as it cools. However a good rasp, a few new scrapers and some sand paper and you can make a pretty stable, nicely shaped neck, it just take a bit of time. I do the facets with a farriers rasp and scrapers now. I get a nice stable, good feeling neck everytime.
    I agree I use the flat one and the weird curve one (goose neck I guess it's called). I also bought a set of scrapers at woodcraft with a slightly smaller goose neck, a convex/concave and a flat scraper. I paid the same for those 3 as I did the Stew Mac goose neck. I use the convex/concave one towards the end of the shaping.
     
  18. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,142
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2012
    Location:
    North of Boston
    Although they are beautiful craftsman style tools, like said above, they require a wealth of knowledge and practice to achieve acceptable results. I have a spoke shave I got from my Uncle, it's a 40+ year old tool that I'm still working on my technique for. It will be awesome to use when I have the skill but for times sake anything that needs to be built in a timely manner gets the rasp and scraper treatment.
     
  19. Wind Gatherer

    Wind Gatherer TDPRI Member

    Age:
    22
    Posts:
    59
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2018
    Location:
    UK
    Would this cabinet scraper set on Ebay UK be good to get? Item number 311833887900
     
  20. Wind Gatherer

    Wind Gatherer TDPRI Member

    Age:
    22
    Posts:
    59
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2018
    Location:
    UK
    OK point noted.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.