Subistitution

P Thought

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I was browsing around through my "old threads" page--what a fun feature--and found one I'd started about "Teacher Burnout". I was blown away then and I'm blown away now by the wisdom and comfort I received from my fellow TDPRIers, quite a few of whom are teachers too. I'd like to file an update report.

That was 2014. I got myself back pretty well rightside up and taught four more years, then retired at age 65. The last two years at graduation I was the faculty speaker, selected by the graduating class, and on the last of those speeches, the whole gymful of people rose and gave me a standing ovulation. That to me was the love I'd put in to my job, come back to me. Made me cry.

That was 2018. I stayed home a full year, then part of the next year, and finally I did a few stints subbing for English teachers, fun and easy because I knew many of the kids. Then the pandemic, the school shut down, and I went back home and stayed there.

This year, just to keep my options open, I renewed my teaching license, filled out some paperwork, and took the "trainings" required so I can substitute for teachers in our district. I don't plan to do it much--don't have to do it at all--but it's good to be able to pick up a few quick bucks when you need. . .you know.

There's a K-8 "charter school" operating in one of the buildings formerly closed by our local district. Longboring story, more than I know anyway, but it's a cool school, set up to be unique the way I guess charter schools are, and they seemed glad to have me. I did three days there last month, grades 6, 8, and 4 respectively, and yesterday put 528 bucks in the bank. After taxes. Yo.

I took another day there Monday this week, with a very zippy bunch of 5th graders. Wore me out. Walked out to the beach yesterday with Mrs. Thought, to the mouth of the mighty Sixes. On my way to bed last night I checked the board, and the same zippy class was posted for tomorrow (well, today now) and I signed up. I think (teachers' comments clue me) this is the zippiest group in the school, and we'd might as well get used to each other. They're very noisy, but not in any way vicious. We'll get along.

I think, I hope, this school will have enough sub opportunities to keep me happy--I'm thinking three or four days a month, no more than ten--without my having to establish myself at the high school again. It's a special place. The younger kids are fun for me. I've met several staff members, a couple of whom were former students of mine, one whose kids were in my classes before, and one (so far) a former colleague. I've likewise found several students whose parents did time in my classes.

I think I'm going to very much enjoy working when I want to, and not working when I don't. Thanks for reading.
 

P Thought

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Here's a couple pictures from the walk I mentioned:
IMG_20221115_161037571.jpg
IMG_20221115_153430719.jpg
IMG_20221115_153320548.jpg
 

Fiesta Red

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Even with the frustration and burnout towards the end of Phase 1 of your career, you obviously had passion and dedication towards the kids.

I’m sure you’ll bring those (positive) things to your substitute sessions—and the kids will be the ultimate winners. Congrats
 

nojazzhere

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I was browsing around through my "old threads" page--what a fun feature--and found one I'd started about "Teacher Burnout". I was blown away then and I'm blown away now by the wisdom and comfort I received from my fellow TDPRIers, quite a few of whom are teachers too. I'd like to file an update report.

That was 2014. I got myself back pretty well rightside up and taught four more years, then retired at age 65. The last two years at graduation I was the faculty speaker, selected by the graduating class, and on the last of those speeches, the whole gymful of people rose and gave me a standing ovulation. That to me was the love I'd put in to my job, come back to me. Made me cry.

That was 2018. I stayed home a full year, then part of the next year, and finally I did a few stints subbing for English teachers, fun and easy because I knew many of the kids. Then the pandemic, the school shut down, and I went back home and stayed there.

This year, just to keep my options open, I renewed my teaching license, filled out some paperwork, and took the "trainings" required so I can substitute for teachers in our district. I don't plan to do it much--don't have to do it at all--but it's good to be able to pick up a few quick bucks when you need. . .you know.

There's a K-8 "charter school" operating in one of the buildings formerly closed by our local district. Longboring story, more than I know anyway, but it's a cool school, set up to be unique the way I guess charter schools are, and they seemed glad to have me. I did three days there last month, grades 6, 8, and 4 respectively, and yesterday put 528 bucks in the bank. After taxes. Yo.

I took another day there Monday this week, with a very zippy bunch of 5th graders. Wore me out. Walked out to the beach yesterday with Mrs. Thought, to the mouth of the mighty Sixes. On my way to bed last night I checked the board, and the same zippy class was posted for tomorrow (well, today now) and I signed up. I think (teachers' comments clue me) this is the zippiest group in the school, and we'd might as well get used to each other. They're very noisy, but not in any way vicious. We'll get along.

I think, I hope, this school will have enough sub opportunities to keep me happy--I'm thinking three or four days a month, no more than ten--without my having to establish myself at the high school again. It's a special place. The younger kids are fun for me. I've met several staff members, a couple of whom were former students of mine, one whose kids were in my classes before, and one (so far) a former colleague. I've likewise found several students whose parents did time in my classes.

I think I'm going to very much enjoy working when I want to, and not working when I don't. Thanks for reading.
I was "kinda" forced to retire from teaching in 2017. My elderly mother (now deceased) was needing a lot of care, and I was the only one of my three other brothers able and willing to take that on. In addition, I was injured by a 350 lb. SPED student, and while I COULD have continued teaching, it was difficult.....so I retired at 65 years-old, about two years ahead of plans. It was the best thing that ever happened to me. While I miss the students (and their energy and enthusiasm) I DON'T miss dealing with admin and a surprising number of narcissistic and passive/aggressive teachers. I find I'm too busy to consider even substituting a few days a month. Enjoy your efforts.....I have no doubt your students are benefitting from you being there. ;)
 

Bourbon Burst

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After college while looking for a career in my field, I was a substitute teacher. I thought I could impart some knowledge to the students. After my first class I realized that it wasn't going to happen as I was to be more of a babysitter. I substituted at my old high school and went up to my old teachers and apologized for everything I did. I wasn't bad, just a clown.
 

drewg

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West of the mountains...
I’m a teacher, too, and gotta say I have been slowing down a bit at 53, in spirit and now in body. (It doesn’t help that I’m still recovering from a bicycle accident and am on medical leave the rest of the term.)

About 15 years ago I was getting discouraged by the direction of administration and the type of students populating the classes (I’m at a state university), but that’s really been changing the last 8 years or so. I’m really impressed now by the energy, eagerness to learn and real belief in positive change by students, despite all we’ve been going through as a country and in the world. It’s inspiring to teach in an atmosphere with students like that.

I recognize those rock formations in the Pacific, P Thought. Sounds like you’re in a good place.
 

Mike Eskimo

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My wife is wrapping up year 32 in her teaching/admin career and eyeing retirement - and then they changed a couple important laws - in her favor.

Now, a garden variety teacher in Michigan can retire after X amount of years, sit out 9 mos , and then rehire with any school district that will hire them (meaning : all, because of teacher shortage) and still get their full pension and benefits plus their new yearly salary.*


She knows a couple teachers who went back this year or are going back next for specific things - down payment on a lake house, brand new dualie to pull their travel trailer , etc.

It’s the “remember being sh** on for the last 20 years in the press and by a certain party ? Well this is the payback !” law.

* and if they are in a high demand field like special Ed or physics , etc they don’t even have to sit out for the 9 mos.

Good luck all you retired educators - it’s time to get YOURS !
 

nojazzhere

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Curious: can you turn down some "subistitution" shifts without being swapped to the bottom of the rota?

I've only ever taught adults and uni students. Kids scare me!
I can only speak for Fort Worth District, but when I first started as a substitute, they were so desperate for subs that even "bottom of the rota" (rotation?) had offers anytime they wanted to work. Also, you could go online and see scheduled vacancies, (teachers scheduled to be out for personal days, meetings, etc) and that way you could "pick and choose" assignments. It was especially easy if you accepted Special Ed assignments. Many subs would NOT do those.....I loved doing them, and when I went full time, it was in SPED.
 




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