Stupid Trio Plus Tricks

Discussion in 'The Stomp Box' started by Toast, Jul 24, 2019.

  1. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    I’m slowly learning how to use my Trio Plus and to organize song parts. Here’s a little Getting Started procedure I wrote for familiarizing yourself with the pedal. Feel free to correct any mistakes

    The Duffer’s Guide to Getting Started with the Trio Plus

    The Trio Plus kind of assumes that you’re going to bring a fully formed song part to it. If you’ve worked out a song part, say, a 12 bar blues part, Key Of A, chord progression I (A) – vi (F# min) - IV (D) - V (E) or whatever, then you’re good to go. However, if you’re looking for ideas to create a song part, then I find it’s better to just start jamming with the T+ backing band. Simply stated, sometimes I just want to spin the Genre and Style dials on my T+ and find something to jam to in a specific key. Easy Enough.

    Procedure (Examples are in key of A Major):

    1. Pick a key you want to play in. -->A

    2. Plan a chord progression for your backing band. -->I-IV-V

    3. Decide on a chunk of time you want your backing band to play over. -->Six bars, 4/4 time, allegro tempo

    4. Arm your Band trainer so its LED is blinking red. Press the Band switch. Plink out the single root notes of your chord progression on your guitar at the tempo you desire your backing band to play at. Press the Band switch again to complete your backing band loop. (Note: I just play the single notes because it helps me get the timing right, but you can play full chords obviously.) --> |A A A A| |A A A A| |D D D D| |D D D D| |E E E E| |E E E E| (Use a metronome to ensure you get the timing of your single notes right.)

    5. You have now created a generic backing band playing in the key of A Major in 4/4 time that will loop every 6 bars. Go spin the Genre and Style dials to give the generic backing band some characteristics to make them interesting.

    6. Important: If you spin the Genre and Style dials and find a backing band groove you like, but want to slow the tempo down on, you can do that. HOWEVER! You can’t record a loop of that backing band at the slower tempo because you always have to return the Tempo button to the middle position in order to turn off the Audiolastic feature. So here is your first thing to commit to memory about the Trio Plus (p.27 from the manual):

    NOTE: The AUDIOLASTIC LED must be off to record into the looper and the LED will briefly flash to indicate this if you attempt to record a loop when the tempo has been altered from the original learned tempo (1X). To resolve this, adjust the TEMPO knob to the 12 o'clock position to set the tempo back to the original learned tempo and disable AUDIOLASTIC time stretching. Once all your loops and overdubs are recorded for the song, you can then adjust the tempo of the song if required.

    So remember that when your Audiolastic is off, your backing band is playing at the “original learned tempo” you trained them to play in. It also means that you can’t record a loop with the backing band if you change the backing band’s tempo from its "original learned tempo". Good luck. Have fun.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2019
  2. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    I found this info helpful (p.28 manual).

    Starting A Song With A Count-In

    To enable a 1-bar count-in before playing a song:
    1. With band playback stopped, press the PART button to select the first part that will be played for the song.
    If you have programmed a song sequence, this will already be selected. Either way, the button for the
    currently selected song part will now be brighter than all the others.
    2. Press and hold the currently selected PART button for 2 seconds (the PART button will begin flashing at
    the rate of the selected part's tempo and enable the count-in feature). Note that pressing and holding the
    PART button again for 2 seconds will disable the count-in.
    3. Press the BAND footswitch when you're ready to start the count-in.
    4. After the 1-bar count-in, the band will start playing and you can play along with it.

    Recording A Loop With The Band Using A Count-In

    It can be very helpful to hear a count-in before you start recording a loop with the band — for example, when
    recording a solo that starts on the first downbeat of the part.

    To enable a 1-bar count-in and record a loop with the band:
    1. Press the BAND footswitch to stop band playback.
    2. Set the LOOP level knob to 12 o'clock.
    3. Ensure the AUDIOLASTIC™ LED is off. If it isn’t, adjust the TEMPO control and set it to the 12 o'clock
    position — the AUDIOLASTIC LED should now turn off.
    4. Select the part you wish to record the loop on.
    5. Press and hold the currently selected PART button for 2 seconds (the PART button will begin flashing at
    the rate of the part's tempo and enable the count-in feature). Note that pressing and holding the PART
    button again for 2 seconds will disable the count-in.
    6. Press the LOOPER footswitch to arm the looper.
    7. Press the BAND footswitch when you're ready to start the count-in.
    8. After the 1-bar count-in, loop recording will begin and you can start playing on the downbeat.
    9. Loop recording will automatically stop and playback will begin when the end of the part is reached. If your guitar part ends before the song part, press the LOOPER footswitch to stop loop recording or keep your guitar silent until the part ends. When the part ends, the LOOPER LED will light solid green and the loop you just recorded will begin playing along with the band.
     
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  3. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    If you're open to a little music theory, this video is helpful for coming up with chord progressions. By the way, getting a Chord Wheel makes coming up with chord progressions a lot easier.

    Diatonic Chord Progression Rules
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2019
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  4. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    This is a timely post as i'm waiting on delivery of a used trio plus.
     
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  5. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    Cool. I'm just throwing up things in this thread that I find useful. I'm slow poking my way along with the T+ because I'm spending most of my time learning to play my guitar rather than learning the pedal. I'm pretty happy with just making basic backing band loops to practice my scales over. Anyway, I hope it helps get you started.
     
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  6. rangercaster

    rangercaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    By the time I would have completed all those steps, I would have lost my inspiration, or forgot what I was trying to achieve in the first place ... Not a fault of the pedal, just the fact I need an engineer so I can concentrate on the music, not the tech side ...
     
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  7. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    I hear you. It's tedious to keep all the particulars straight, but I figure it's good for my intellect to solve these puzzles and the payoff is musical bliss. So far the tedium hasn't outweighed my enjoyment. To be honest though, it's not that difficult to get the pedal working for you if you already have a smidgeon of musical skill/knowledge.
     
  8. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've been watching a few demos and think I know how to get started, combined with your info above I hope to get comfortable using it pretty quickly. Cheers for the tips.
     
  9. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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  10. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    Yeah, it's not that hard to get started, especially if you're a good musician already. Have fun.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2019
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  11. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I usually struggle maintaining interest in pedals with more than a few knobs. The trio plus looks like it's worth taking the time to get the most out of it but does seem pretty straight forward for the basics. I was just in need of something to keep things interesting and think the trio looks like a lot of fun and more likely to motivate and inspire than just buying another piece of gear that's similar to stuff i've already got or had in the past. In the long run it seems like it will be a lot easier to use than having to find and play backing tracks when practicing etc.
     
  12. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    As a backing track creator, it's incredibly convenient. So far I'm loving the backing band grooves, but I'm easy to please at this point. I do feel sometimes that I might have the Trio Plus Syd Vicious Signature Pedal because my backing band's bassist can go off the rails in ugly ways. Anyway, a seasoned musician might find the backing band lacking. The nice thing about the band creator is that you have some control over the grooves of the backing band through the way you train it. I'm not sure how much influence a user has though, but I'm going to find out. Anyway, I played on it for hours yesterday. I'm learning my minor pentatonic scale patterns with pleasure. I'm also enjoying listening to my own loops. I think you'll enjoy it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2019
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  13. GuitLoop

    GuitLoop Tele-Meister

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    Since you are a backing track creator...If you ever find that you want more control over the sound/groove/etc that the Trio creates, Band In A Box (the software that powers the trio) can give you that. I use both the Trio pedal and the BIAB software to create backing sound. Generally I go to BIAB when I'm creating a backing track for a specific song, and I go to the Trio when I want to jam over a groove or work on ideas for an original tune.
     
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  14. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    Yeah, I think the Trio will be the perfect stepping stone to recording software and apps like BIAB. I don't have a DAW right now, but that's the direction I'm going in. I've got a long term perspective though. I'm going to accumulate stuff over time so I hope the T+ will fill in the gaps as I gain more competence on my guitar. Edit: You got a great Youtube channel. I'm going to check it out more and get some ideas.
     
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  15. archtop_fjk

    archtop_fjk Tele-Holic

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    For generating quick backing tracks for practice or song creation, the Trio is great! Just a few presses with the switch and you’re off and running. However, for original songs I plan to record, I always create individual tracks on my DAW playing each instrument live, then vocals and mix. But for working out song ideas, the Trio is very valuable to me - much better than using my guitar alone. And you can record the raw Trio + live guitar song ideas then come back to them later. I’ve got many “demo” songs on my computer - mostly riffs and interesting chord sequences and rhythms. Some of those will make the grade and eventually become songs. :)
     
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  16. GuitLoop

    GuitLoop Tele-Meister

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    Exactly what i did...I started with the trio then added biab to the mix. Btw...Audacity is a nice free DAW...Worth checking it out and you can't beat the price!

    Thanks for the comment on my youtube channel!
     
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  17. archtop_fjk

    archtop_fjk Tele-Holic

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    I actually use Audacity for creating multitrack songs on my Windows PC. Yes - it's not the most full-featured DAW out there, but to be honest that's part of its charm. It's easy to set up and use, and you can employ a huge range of VST plugins to add additional functionality. It has most everything I need to record and edit my tracks, and let's face it I'm not trying to be Abby Road or anything! :D

    I eventually want to try Reaper and have used Mixcraft in the past. They're great too, but Mixcraft in particular was relatively complicated to use versus Audacity (though quite powerful). But for creating song ideas, the Trio pedal is a wonderful tool.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2019
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  18. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    I used Audacity in the past and it was nice because it doesn't overwhelm you with too many options. I've really put off messing with Audacity, Reaper, and others mainly because I'm focused on my guitar playing and working with the Trio Plus. I'm also working through figuring out how to set up my guitars myself (watching lots of Dave's guitar repair videos https://www.youtube.com/user/davey4557). So, I'm trying to manage my thinking space a little and going through a DAW manual can wait till I'm producing music worth recording. Once I've mastered the T+, I'll get my DAW up and running. That's the plan anyway :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2019
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  19. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    When I start working more with recording software, I'll probably start with Audacity, gain some competence, then move onto one of the bigger applications. I like Audacity because it's a less painful learning curve that kind of prepares a user to get into a recording mind-set. I have to get my mind oriented to what I'm doing, then (only if I have to :)) I crack open the manual. Reaper looks promising because it has a huge community of people to get help from. When I'm trying to learn something, I like having lots of varying explanations available. I usually find one explanation that gets me over the hump while others can leave me scratching my head, but they all tend to add up to understanding.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2019
  20. archtop_fjk

    archtop_fjk Tele-Holic

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    To me, the specific features of a DAW are not as important as the options (and hardware) used for recording the tracks to your computer in the first place. After all, once you have the tracks, you can export them to any DAW for further processing and mastering if you want. The main thing is to get the tracks onto your computer with the optimal resolution (e.g. 32-bit float and 44100 Hz), no signal clipping, and as little noise as possible. Noise is a BIG issue (for me). It can be ambient noise (from the computers fan!), electrical interference, and buzzing from poor connections. I try my best to reduce noise to a minimum as most post-recording noise reduction tools really mess up the original sound too much.

    Oh, I almost forgot - you need to address latency issues if you plan to overdub. There nothing like recording your drum track perfectly just to find it's 100 ms out of sync with your original track! :confused::mad:
     
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