stupid questions about sanding... and deep gratitude.

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Newbcaster, Nov 28, 2018.

  1. Newbcaster

    Newbcaster Tele-Holic

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    First off the gratitude. I have to thank Chris "DrAsaTele" for sending me several guitar bodies. Sometime ago i asked for several to do up for a local dog charity at the behest of my wife.

    He's an absolute mensch in my book. And what he sent me was some great stuff. Either the glue join on this strat body was WELL DONE, or its nonexistent. Whoever made this made it as a one piece. In either case its nice. It came with this white paint that just had to be removed which I did with a heat gun.

    But what grit do I start with to sand it and what do I finish the bare wood at b4 primer?

    ive never done a rattle can color.

    After I get the body prepped for primer, how many coats of primer do i need and do i need to sand that? If so, what grit do i start with and what is the end goal?

    Lastly, I'm probably stuck with Rustoleum or Dupont colors from Walmart. no fancy HVLP in my garage Im afraid. How many coats and do I sand between coats or what?

    Would I want or need clear coat poly over the colored coats?


    I have half a mind to SRV it because I love the tobacco color of the wood. Im not even sure what wood it is. Just completely strip it, 20181126_214711.jpg 20181125_134428.jpg 20181126_211438.jpg 20181125_134428.jpg 20181126_214711.jpg
     
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  2. NICQ

    NICQ Tele-Meister

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    Sand the bare body with 120 - 180 - 240 and try to get it all even and flat before applying the primer.
    The primer coat should not show any irregularities - every visible spot or crack here will be visible later on.
    Normally one or two light coats suffice - the primer should cover the wood and form a smooth surface over the wood for the colour to stick to.
    Scuff the dried primer lightly with 320 or 400 before applying the colour - again: no uneven spots or irregularities should be visible on the surface-
    Normally you do not sand between the colour coats - how many coats depends on the brand and often is printed on the can.
    Yes you will need a clearcoat to protect the colour coat - best thing is to stay in one system: if you can get primer, colour and clear from the same brand.
    If that's not available try on a scrap piece to test compatibility.
     
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  3. Newbcaster

    Newbcaster Tele-Holic

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    so how does one build a makeshift paint booth in the garage so the dust doesnt ruin the paint?
     
  4. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    I used to get crazy cleaning everything and vacuuming which takes a few hours in my case. I do very little of that anymore. My uncle is a pro and he finishes fine furniture in his garage. I asked him the same question and he does none of that. The last few times I only swept the area I spray in and let the dust settle for an hour or so and had no issues whatsoever - except for the odd critter. I spray a little water in the air to knock down any dust then go for it. I have no dedicated spray booth. Sweep the area so you're not walking in it and use a spray bottle with water. YMMV.
     
  5. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    I made this out of a couple of guitar shipping boxes. Of course it doesn't have any air filtration nor does it get around the problem of explosion or breathing fumes. As much as anything I was trying to keep the overspray off the cars.

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    I'm subscribed to this channel and this came up this morning. Maybe a bit of overkill but...

     
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  7. NICQ

    NICQ Tele-Meister

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    I used to be overly concerned about that too and tried to build a booth, then settled for a cardbox style thing in a corner.. nowadays I spray my guitar in my garage - normally there is no dust flying around and I never had problems. I even sprayed a couple of guitar in a corner of the yard outside this year.. just be careful that it's not too windy, not directly in the sun in summer when it's too hot. Not much to it after you did a couple of guitars..

    Be sure to wear a mask though with A2P2 filters from 3M for example - that stuff is extremely toxic
     
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  8. NICQ

    NICQ Tele-Meister

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    by the way - here some examples :

    A cheap and beat up Epiphone Les Paul Junior that I bought for 20€

    I sanded it with a random orbital sander with 120 grit - then 180 and finally 240 :


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    did the sides and edges by hand

    Then wiped the dust off with lighter fluid and sprayed one coat of primer outside before the garage in the yard in a quiet corner:
    [​IMG]

    let that dry and carefully scuffed it up lightly with 600 grid - then applied 2 yellow color coats :
    [​IMG]


    then after that dried I applied one heavy coat of 2K clear - didn't need to polish because that clear is really glossy

    the guitar came out great:

    [​IMG]



    It's not exactly the same as your process because the guitar was already finished and I just scuffed the existing finish to apply the primer over it. If you have a bare wood body be sure sand it until the surface is really smooth and maybe fill any holes or cuts with porefiller/woodpaste so that everything is really flat before applying the primer.

    By the way I used DupliColor Primer and DupliColor Yellow - and as clear I used ColorMatic 2k which is used on cars, very fast drying and glossy hard clear.
     
  9. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Howdy my friend! Glad to see things coming along. I remember that one, a great Alder body. The eBay seller had a few that were well matched pieces, this one could have past for a single piece. I think I sent you one of the Tele bodies I got from them too but I think I modified it with tummy and forearm cuts? or that one could still be in the basement . . .anyway . . .
    I'll answer your sanding question. Find the deepest scratches, sand those with 220. If it takes a long time to get the scratches to disappear then you should probably try 180 or 150. Then work your way up to 220-320. That body was sanded to 320 before I painted it.

    I think the issue I had with that one was I did not wait long enough between coats. I think the re-coat time was like within 4 hours which didn't happen and then after 72 hours. I sprayed a day later and some of the paint lifted as it dried.

    What color are you going for?
     
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  10. Newbcaster

    Newbcaster Tele-Holic

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    I'm so torn. I dont love at all tobacco sun bursts

    But I do love the color of that wood as is. Like God used to chew tobacco and spat on an alder tree.

    It's got this bluesy kinda vibe to it.

    I might just finish the strip and build a Doug fir neck with flame maple fretboard and matching headstock. Gold evo fretwire.

    Just fill and clear matte the whole thing. Gloss on the fretboard.

    The other half of me wants to a deep, bright Red, similar to fiesta, but with more pink than Tomato. Its gotta be RED. MOTS pickguard, gold everything ala Hank Marvin. A kinda nod to him and Mark Knopfler.

    Instead of mots I may use flame maple, load it with blue dye and sand it back a bunch of times. Then coat it with white dye or a translucent milk paint?

    Lots of ways I can go here.

    I even thought about replicating Steve Vai's green meanie, a double entendre nod to Brainy.

    Newb

    .
     
  11. Newbcaster

    Newbcaster Tele-Holic

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    [QUOTE="NICQ, post: 8754902, member: 136221"

    [​IMG]



    It's not exactly the same as your process because the guitar was already finished and I just scuffed the existing finish to apply the primer over it. If you have a bare wood body be sure sand it until the surface is really smooth and maybe fill any holes or cuts with porefiller/woodpaste so that everything is really flat before applying the primer.

    By the way I used DupliColor Primer and DupliColor Yellow - and as clear I used ColorMatic 2k which is used on cars, very fast drying and glossy hard clear.[/QUOTE]

    Dude, I love this guitar. This guitar, well, an LP Jr. was what made the legendary sound for Money for Nothing, NOT a LP, or a Strat. A p 90 with 1 cab mic'd with 2 mics out of phase on accident.

    I can't even begin to tell you how much I love this thing.
     
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