Struggling with Tele's neck ( Fender AV58 )

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by Danz, Aug 8, 2019.

  1. Danz

    Danz TDPRI Member

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    Hi guys,


    I'm starting this topic because I want to share my struggles with the neck of my Telecaster and to hear what you suggest me to solve my problems.


    I have a Fender AV58 that I bought on discount right before the American Vintage was discontinued. I love this guitar so much and yet I don't feel "home" when I play it despite owning and playing for 2 years. This is coming from the neck itself that I don't seem to bond with.


    It could be the neck profile ( I have small hands with short fingers ) because my other guitar is a Gibson LP with a 50's neck. I could also be because of the very short frets even though I don't like big and large frets. Mostly, I believe is the stickyness of the Nitro finish on the back and on the fretboard that I really hate.


    I am considering building a neck from Warmoth with different specs but I want to hear from you if you have tips to share to sort of "fix" the stock neck before investing. Not to mention the stock neck has a gorgeous plain top figuring that I have not seen oftenly on a maple neck.
     
  2. Nick Fanis

    Nick Fanis Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Scotch brite.
    The green one.
    That's your solution if stickiness is actually your issue.
     
  3. EsquireBoy

    EsquireBoy Tele-Holic

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    I am not sure to follow you, since the Gibson 50’s profile should be pretty big.

    For that, a simple fix can be to « scotch brit » lightly the back of the neck. It is IMO a less invasive method than steel wool, and without the hassle of having to protect the pickups. In a word: a few minutes business that should cure your problem.

    It will cost you some cash, and in the end you cannot be sure you will bond with it either. A neck profile is a personal thing, so buying without trying is always a gamble.

    IME, electronics and bridge design apart, the neck is the big factor of the sound of a solid body guitar. By changing the neck you would basically be changing your instrument, for better or worse.

    In the end here is my opinion:
    - scotch brit on the neck and, eventually, a refret with 6105 = around 300-400 usd.
    - trade the guitar for another one which you love the sound as much but that would have a neck you can bond with from the beginning.
     
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  4. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    I've never experienced the "sticky" nitro issue, myself, outside of personal projects done with Deft brand nitro lacquer. And even then, it's more "soft" than "sticky." Not sure why it seems to be such a commonly described problem on the Internet. It's weird to me, as I find that gloss urethanes tend to have a weird feel to my hands moreso than gloss lacquers.

    AVs are at least two years old now. The finishes should be fully dry by now. Try leaving the thing out of the case in a warm room for a year.

    Have you tried not cleaning the neck? Your dead skin should build up on it, kind of merge with the upper layer of lacquer, and make it matte in all the right places before too long.
     
    DanDII likes this.
  5. hemingway

    hemingway Poster Extraordinaire

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    Yep, as others have said, sand that mother.

    I go for the unsubtle method: 240 grit sandpaper. Just take the top off the finish, no need to go all the way to the wood. Stickiness gone forever.
     
    jvin248 likes this.
  6. JIMMY JAZZMAN

    JIMMY JAZZMAN Tele-Meister

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    Had the same problem, on a Tele with a 7.25 board. Just couldn't "glide", if you dig. Got a players series,
    nice neck, great pickups, modded it with locking tuners and I can "glide" once again. Sometimes you
    have to figure who you are on the fretboard.
     
  7. scelestus

    scelestus Tele-Meister

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    I'd use Scotch Brite as mentioned but I would just do the back of the neck. If you're playing lightly enough the fretboard shouldn't be a problem by itself and doing that to the board could affect resale in a way just doing the back wouldn't.
     
    nojazzhere likes this.
  8. OzShadow

    OzShadow Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    Buy a MIM neck for $150 and swap it and/or tinker with. If you ever sell it, swap back.
     
    aerhed, DanDII, jvin248 and 1 other person like this.
  9. Piggy Stu

    Piggy Stu Friend of Leo's

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    If you don't love it let it go. You will probably make a profit as the 58 is very rare. I don't think Scotch Brite is your solution

    I was after a 58 to try just before they cancelled. I was told Fender held a single one in warehousing in Holland that my guitar shop owning buddy would have to buy for me to try, so I did not go ahead

    Probably your guitar, if it was about 2 years ago
     
    El Tele Lobo likes this.
  10. burntfrijoles

    burntfrijoles Poster Extraordinaire

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    Ah, the neck. The mot crucial component of the guitar in terms of physically "bonding" with the instrument.
    I had a beautiful Les Paul that I felt the same way about. The neck was just too big and round. It's gone now but I miss its tone and its beauty.
    Some like 'em big and round. Some like 'em with big shoulders. Some like 'em thin and contoured.
    I searched in vain for Gibson SG with a neck that I would like to no avail and finally gave up. I tried a PRS but same thing.
    I feel your pain.
     
  11. ricardo1912

    ricardo1912 Tele-Afflicted

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    I think the scotchbrite idea is good. I've taken the gloss off the back of most of my guitar necks. Only costs pence to do, takes about half an hour.

    If you still don't bond with the guitar just polish the neck back to shiny and sell it. I've bought guitars that I really wanted to like but, for whatever reason, never did and let them go. It's a very personal thing and not always logical. Good luck.
     
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  12. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    Other than the stickiness, I can't identify what your issue is without assuming one thing or another.

    When you play, what do you wish was different about the profile? What frets would feel right?
     
  13. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    First try some talc powder on your hand to see if getting the stickiness is the fix for the guitar. Then get the green scotchbrite, but mask off the ends of the headstock and heel in a way that it looks like a professional line. Otherwise people run it out and it looks amateurish. Don't go down to the wood. Just lightly on top. If you use 800+ grit sandpaper you can polish it back to a shine later when you decide to sell the guitar.

    .
     
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  14. Danz

    Danz TDPRI Member

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    I feel like the stickiness is the biggest issue right now. So I will follow everyone's advice and gently sand the gloss. If after this if I still don't bond with the neck I'll get a replacement. Maybe I wasn't clear enough but having a replica of a Fender Whiteguard has always been a dream so selling the guitar is out of question.
     
  15. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    I'd use a Scotchbrite pad first, instead of sanding first. Scotchbrite will knock down the gloss without removing finish.
     
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  16. CJM3309

    CJM3309 Tele-Meister

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    I have a 2013 AV64 and love the guitar, but had the same finish issue on the neck when I first got it. I knew I wasn't getting rid of it so I hit the neck lightly with some 000 steel wool. Took down the stickiness and after playing a while its nice and worn in now. Still has that gloss look, but not sticky, just feels like home.
     
  17. Blues63

    Blues63 TDPRI Member

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    I have an AVRI '58 and it has a sticky neck as well (well, only on hot days and in Australia that means very hot). I'm thinking about the Scotch-Brite remedy myself (see above), but I will try the talcum powder suggestion first.

    I quite like the neck profile and the fret height, so they don't bother me, however, the flash coat is very fragile and is damaged rather easily. Having said that, it is my favourite guitar and it's a 'cold dead hands' keeper.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2019
  18. DrPepper

    DrPepper Tele-Afflicted

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    What he said, or, some 400 grit sandpaper. You don't need to take it down to the wood. just matte the surface. By the way, if you just keep playing it, it will improve on it's own...
     
  19. E5RSY

    E5RSY Doctor of Teleocity

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    Keep playing it and adapt.
     
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  20. dannyh

    dannyh Tele-Afflicted

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    I’ve experienced the sticky nitro thing with several guitars including an AV64. Rather than go at the finish with an abrasive, I keep a soft t-shirt nearby, and really rub down the back of the neck anytime I feel it start to “gum up”. After a couple weeks the problem usually goes away. YMMV depending on how much you play the guitar, but it’s a lot easier than sanding and won’t really alter the finish. Might give it a try.
     
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