Strange really that when talking about Rock N Roll legends nobody mentions Bill Haley.

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by Blazer, Sep 6, 2019.

  1. beagle

    beagle Friend of Leo's

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    Yeah, the Fiesta club, there are rumours that we stole the huge (about 40 feet long, bright orange) vinyl advertising banner from outside. I couldn't possibly comment of course. :)
     
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  2. PeterUK

    PeterUK Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    That’s the one! I had tickets!

    Is the Fiesta Club still there? I doubt it as it was a place from a time long gone!

    :) Peter
     
  3. beagle

    beagle Friend of Leo's

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    The building is still there, it's now the Odeon cinema, the Fiesta nightclub closed down about 1980.
     
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  4. stanger

    stanger Tele-Meister

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    Bill's age probably had to do with a lot of his fadeaway. He had been a road dog, playing honkey-tonks for 20 years before he had his first hit record. He was in his mid-40s when the hits began, and he died at age 55.

    Back in the early 50s, rock and roll was viewed more as a novelty, a new twist on jitterbug, than a musical genre of its own, and the music industry wasn't sure just where rock fit in. Was it pop music, or hillbilly, or rhythm and blues? Hayley and the Comets dropped into any or all of those slots, but wasn't an exact fit for any of them.

    And he was a little old when the hits began coming for him. It wasn't very long before he began looking a little old-fashioned when young guys began making hits playing rock.

    I think that was a part of his fade. The younger guys who followed him- Johnny Cash, Elvis, Little Richard, and the big-city do-wop groups, etc. all had time on their side.

    As youngsters, they gave rock the definition of the genre, and rock and roll was a bigger and more inclusive genre than all the others had been before.

    Rock was the first pop music form that was solidly it's own thing in a whole bunch of different ways. As long as the beat and the basic elements of the sound were there, it was rock. And if it was rock, it could be uptown rock, hillbilly rock, or rhythm 'n blues rock. The kids all knew what it was and they were the ones who bought the music.

    It took some time for that to happen. I remember the 50s well, and back then, radio was the big deal. Listening to the Top 40 especially, and in those days, a kid was just as likely to hear a hit by Lawrence Welk followed by Fabian, followed by Bill Hayley, followed by Mitch Miller and his Sing-Along Gang as to hear a full day of nothing but rock and roll.

    By the time rock was firmly set in its own territory, Bill was just too old to keep up with the kids. And rock was always young people's music first and foremost. Kids always want something new.

    Given all the one-hit wonders that came and went in a flash, I think Bill's fame is greater and a lot longer lasting than most early rockers.
    His influence was sure large on the younger artists, and especially large on the guitar. Hayley wasn't the fist bandleader to play the guitar, but he sold the most records and was in the most movies with his guitar front and center, at a time when a bandleader was still a guy with a baton in his hand. not a guitar.

    And back then, the sax or piano were the hot instruments for solos.
    Hayley's guitar solos made the guitar a lead instrument on a vocal record. The solos weren't fancy, but they were solid rock and roll that made kid's feet move to the melody. That too was a real novelty for the time, when people would still gather around a piano to sing songs, not a guitar

    Of course Les Paul was dazzling, and showed the world the powers of the electric guitar, but Les never rocked. The rhythm and blues guys could rock hard, but they were all black folks, and back then, very few of them got any airtime on white radio stations.

    Sam Phillips always said he wanted to find a white guy who sounded like a black guy. He found Elvis Presley, but Bill Hayley was already there first. He sounded like a white guy in a black band, or a black guy in a white band.

    He bridged both and was really good at it.
    regards,
    stanger
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019
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  5. PeterUK

    PeterUK Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    To be fair it should have been closed down in 1880!

    :lol: Peter
     
  6. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Doctor of Teleocity

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    Not necessarily, judging by the few songs of their’s that I know, but I agree with others, when saying they come off as being somewhat square, when compared to much of the genres, prototypical, rebel image. Not really Pat Boone, (white shoes-like), but hardly an older, badass, like Chuck Berry...just sayin. Conversely, Fats Domino’s non-threatening, musical genius, was part of his universal charm. Perhaps it’s that Richie Cunningham thing, regardless, they do swing & then there’s that guitar solo!
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019
  7. beagle

    beagle Friend of Leo's

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    It was a 70s thing. Very, very 70s. It had to stay there. :D
     
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  8. wyclif

    wyclif Tele-Afflicted

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    My first guitar teacher was John Kay (the guy with the eye patch playing lead guitar for the Comets in the London Rock and Roll Show clip at the top of this thread, back in 1972)—then known as Johnny Kay, who played guitar for Bill Haley from 1960-1968 and on and off in the '70s before retiring.

    He was living in the town I grew up in and taking students. When I was 16 I got a pawn shop acoustic guitar and started going to him for lessons, paying with my paper route money. He was one of the early rockabilly guys and I was into The Clash. He was the first person who ever showed me a Gibson guitar up close, nobody else in my town had a Gibson electric, he had a cherry red ES-335 and knew all the Chuck Berry licks and a lot of early rock and roll. The Gibson thing never rubbed off on me—I was a Fender kid and still am, but the rockabilly did influence me a lot and really inspire me. He's still around and he still plays out occasionally!

    Here's John Kay on the significance of Bill Haley:

    Bill was the guy who made rock ‘n’ roll famous with ‘Rock Around the Clock.’ He is acknowledged more in Europe than here as being the creator. I was watching a series on MTV about rock and they left Bill out. I got kind of p.o.’d. They started with Elvis Presley. So Elvis created rock? Bill was playing rock three years before Elvis. Then I heard another person say The Beatles started rock ‘n’ roll. There is some revision of history going on.

    Bill didn’t have the sex appeal. It was more the music. People came for the music. There were very little drugs in those days and no one in the band really drank. We were kind of the oddballs.

    When I would go to his home studio for my lesson, he had an old poster that was a foldout from one of the original UK records of The Beatles, signed by each Beatle, framed on the wall directly across from the student's chair. Talk about inspiration! He knew all of The Beatles and had played with them in Hamburg. I was blown away when he told me, "oh, yeah, The Beatles opened for us (Bill Haley and the Comets) in Hamburg."

    Occasionally he'd tell me first-person stories about The Beatles hijinks in Hamburg, but since I was a minor he was pretty careful to keep the stories R-rated. Still, I could read between the lines. After my lesson I'd go home, take my guitar out of the trunk of the car, go into my room, put Revolver on my stereo and put the headphones on, and I'd be tripping while listening to the music—no drugs involved!—in total awe, thinking, "whoa, I'm just one degree of separation from them!"
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019
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  9. PeterUK

    PeterUK Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Words of a very wise man!

    :) Peter
     
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  10. claes

    claes Tele-Holic

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    Bill Haley is definitely the pioneer for rockn roll in Europe. His films was the first contact Europe hade with rockn roll. So it isn't strange it is a dutchman that posted this.

    That green rocket 88 seems to have swedish plates.
     
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  11. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    rock around the clock is one of the all time great songs...he has other cool songs too
     
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